Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1251

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Mark A. Campbell (campbell)
Thu, 25 Feb 1999 08:44:58 -0500


Please remove campbell from your list
thank you Mark Campbell

----------
> From: artsednet-digest <owner-artsednet-digest>
> To: artsednet-digest.edu
> Subject: artsednet-digest V2 #1251
> Date: Thursday, February 18, 1999 3:41 PM
>
>
> artsednet-digest Thursday, February 18 1999 Volume 02 : Number
1251
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> Can I ever catch up???
> Re: Faith and Meaning in Art
> Re: portfolios/storage
> MEANING and the artist
> Re: hand wipes
> Re: Faith and Meaning in Art
> Re: Can I ever catch up???
> RE; classroom discipline
> Re: African American Artists
> Question yourself as an educator
> Shel Silverstein
> RE: classroom discipline
> [none]
> Re: African American Artists
> Re: Can I ever catch up???
> Re: re; cleaning paintbrushes
> Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1243
> RE: African American Artists
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 09:16:35 EST
> From: MarshArt
> Subject: Can I ever catch up???
>
> It seems AOL was not transmitting to Florida for a day. I really missed
Y'all.
>
> My husband woke me up this morning is hysterical laughter. It logged on
for me
> and told me I had 149 email messages in my box. Well I AM working down
the
> list but will I ever get to the bottom??????
>
> Marsha in beautiful So. Florida who can't enjoy it because I have to get
> through this mail!!!!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 06:47:14 -0800 (PST)
> From: Ayesha Jones <ayeshajones>
> Subject: Re: Faith and Meaning in Art
>
> How soon we forget! The artist was Andres Serrano
>
>
>
> - ---carla schiller <charwitt.us> wrote:
> >
> > The post reprinted below, which I completely disagree with, reminds me
> > that I have a question I hope someone on the list can answer. I had
> > thought that the artist Mapplethorpe was the one who created the
> > controversial beaker of urine with a cross in it, but one of my
> students
> > told me I am mistaken. Can anyone tell me who the actual artist
> is/was?
> > Thanks.
> > --Carla
> >
> >
> _________________________________________________________
> DO YOU YAHOO!?
> Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 09:44:40 -0500
> From: "Donna Janeczko" <redhen>
> Subject: Re: portfolios/storage
>
> Teri wrote:
> " I teach K-12 and I keep all their work in portfolios until
> May. We made large portfolios (11x17") out of rolls of heavy
> paper that was donated from some company..."
>
> This is a great idea, especially since it was turned into a project for
the
> students -- HOWEVER, if anyone's looking for pre-manufactured art
> assessment portfolios, there are 56 left in my inventory which I'm
selling
> for $1.00 each (less than 50% of the retail price.) They are 12 1/2" X
18
> 1/4".
>
> I've also put up a page of used art education books, which is linked at
the
> bottom of the new materials inventory.
>
> Art Ed. Materials Garage Sale at:
> http://members.tripod.com/~LittleRed_2/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: 18 Feb 1999 09:45:39 U
> From: "Cindy Cronn" <cindy_cronn.ne.us>
> Subject: MEANING and the artist
>
> I think we all have had experiences with artists who say that it is not
important that they have any reason for their work, that it is just a
personal expression and too bad if you don't get it. I am referring to
Ayesha's comments about an artist/friend who was operating this way. As
teachers, we also are confronted by the skepticism of our students for whom
the above attitude just verifies what they believe about art forms that are
difficult to deal with. I like the approach of asking students to suspend
judgment as we work together to find ways of considering challenging art.
I don't want to be the expert who tells kids what to believe. Helping
students find their own language about art and what it means is a safe
approach, but it is also likely to be more successful. I think sometimes a
danger with students is that they may "overinterpret" what they see.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 09:51:06 -0600
> From: "Betty Bowen" <bbowen.ok.us>
> Subject: Re: hand wipes
>
> I don't remember the recipe ratios exactly - it involved gentle
dishwashing
> soap, so the new antibacterial soaps would be even better - but this is
what
> my mother used to do (80 year old retired 3rd grade teacher)
>
> One tupperware or rubbermaid -type bowl with TIGHT lid. Cut an X in the
> center of the lid with a sharp knife.
>
> One roll Bounty or other heavy-duty paper towel. Saw or cut in half
> cross-wise and remove cardboard roll. "Start" the end of the towel and
pull
> through the bottom of the lid. The bowl needs to be large & deep enough
for
> the half-roll to fit easily and expand when saturated.
>
> Mix your water/ antibacterial soap mixture in another container. The mix
> should mostly be water, you don't want your hands actually soapy. Pour
mix
> into the bowl (which already contains the half-roll) and close lid
tightly.
> The towels will soak up the mixture, and you can pull off individual
towels
> as needed without removing the lid.
>
> If I can get my mom to dig out the actual recipe, I'll post it.
>
> Betty
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 11:57:50 -0500
> From: buerklej.fl.us (Buerkle, Jennifer)
> Subject: Re: Faith and Meaning in Art
>
> I had thought it was Maplethorpe, as well...wonder how his name became
> associated with it...same exhibit as the infamous RM one, maybe?
>
> J
>
> Maggie White wrote:
>
> > carla schiller wrote:
> > >
> > > I had
> > > thought that the artist Mapplethorpe was the one who created the
> > > controversial beaker of urine with a cross in it, but one of my
students
> > > told me I am mistaken. Can anyone tell me who the actual artist
is/was?
> >
> > The artist was Andres Serrano.
> >
> > Maggie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 11:56:43 +0000
> From: Ann Carolan <acarolan.us>
> Subject: Re: Can I ever catch up???
>
> Dear Marsha,
> It was snowing all night and in the teens, so enjoy the sunshine. One
> tip for answering letters I have is to go to Eudora Light and set up a
> site to transfer mail to your computer at home. Instead of watching all
> that boring TV, I write letters on email and read my mail at home quite
> often. It's more fun because there's no pressures from work.
>
> ann c
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 12:31:03 -0500
> From: "Stephanie Ignazio" <smi>
> Subject: RE; classroom discipline
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_002D_01BE5B3A.8C7D3840
> Content-Type: text/plain;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> My suggestion was that the teacher having the problem limit the =
> materials they can use for a few lessons and let them earn the right to =
> experiment with different media as their behavior improves. In my =
> situation the classroom teacher wanted to cancel art indefinately until =
> their behavior improved..I didn't think that was a solution at all. Some
=
> classroom teachers have a attitude "all or nothing". This seemed to work
=
> with the class that I had. It was only a suggestion.
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_002D_01BE5B3A.8C7D3840
> Content-Type: text/html;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN">
> <HTML>
> <HEAD>
>
> <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 =
> http-equiv=3DContent-Type>
> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR>
> </HEAD>
> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
> <DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>My suggestion was that the teacher =
> having the=20
> problem limit the materials they can use for a few lessons and let them =
> earn the=20
> right to experiment with different media as their behavior improves. In =
> my=20
> situation the classroom teacher wanted to cancel art indefinately until =
> their=20
> behavior improved..I didn't think that was a solution at all. Some =
> classroom=20
> teachers have a attitude &quot;all or nothing&quot;. This seemed to work
=
> with=20
> the class that I had. It was only a =
> suggestion.</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_002D_01BE5B3A.8C7D3840--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 12:44:21 -0500
> From: "Stephanie Ignazio" <smi>
> Subject: Re: African American Artists
>
> I am interested if anybody out there has done a lesson on William Johnson
or
> John Biggers? I am developing a unit on African American Artists and
would
> like your imput. I have already developed a lesson for Faith
Ringgold..but
> want to continue this thread with my third graders. Any ideas of other
> artists or general help would be appreciated. Thanks Stephanie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 13:20:12 EST
> From: Elizreese
> Subject: Question yourself as an educator
>
> Hello friends-
>
> I imagine that we've all had days when things just seem to be "off"--and
Jill,
> I commend you on being so honest about the tough times that you face and
that
> some days situations are handled not exactly how you wish. I also
appreciate
> your honesty to openly question what it is that you're doing, and to
invite us
> to engage in dialogues about your challenges.
>
> In my opinion, it seems important to question ourselves as educators
every
> day, not only on the days that seem to go sour. Because even on days
when we
> say "yeah! THAT was a great day!" it can be crucial to examine exactly
what
> made it great... and then perhaps to consider how to make tomorrow even
> better. We all want (and need!) to be able to pat ourselves on the back,
and
> even to have others give us positive acknowledgement. What appears to be
a
> success to the teacher, however, may be seen or experienced quite
differently
> by the student.
>
> As Bill Readings said, "...teaching is always a practice...: we must seek
to
> do justice to teaching rather than to know what it is (and, in fact, a
belief
> that we know what teaching is or should be is a major impediment to just
> teaching)."
>
> So perhaps we can remember that as "practicing educators" we can--and
indeed
> should--consider new theories, experiment with new methods, learn from
our
> experiences today, and apply our evolving knowledge tomorrow.
>
>
> Elizabeth B. Reese
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 12:23:39 -0600
> From: Nora Redfern <nredfern>
> Subject: Shel Silverstein
>
> Possible dumb question alert!***** Is Shel Silverstein a black man?
> Thanks, Nora
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 12:43:32 -0600
> From: marianna delafield <mdelafield>
> Subject: RE: classroom discipline
>
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: MCCon513 [SMTP:MCCon513]
> Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 1999 8:27 PM
> To:
> Subject: classroom discipline
>
> In regards to the "4th grade from space"-do you really think that it's a
good
> idea to use drawing as a punishment? It seems to me that there has got
to be
> a better way. If things are really bad, does the classroom teacher have
any
> suggestions? Have you tried talking to the parents of the ones that act
out.
> It's hard enough to teach drawing skills and art history as it is...
Susan
> I also don't like to use good lessons as punishment. I have sometimes
used the strategy of giving directions from a circle to introduce a lesson
to a class. In a circle you can make eye contact with each student and
actually see what they are doing. Also, its possible to move around behind
them and zero in on people who are not listening. Often in this case just
a look or a hand on the shoulder, can make a difference. I have also had
the children work in this way, on the floor. This way I can get to each
child to give assistance, when necessary. Its a helpful thing for the
children to see what is going on and know that you can also see them, and
anticipate when they need help. Often if you can motivate the students
with your directions, and with the anticipated production. The discipline
problems may be helped. This is one of those holdovers from "magic circle"
days, (that us dinasours still have not thrown out with the bathwater).
What ever goes around does come aro!
> und....... sometimes.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 13:58:20 -0500 (EST)
> From: Julie Trzybinski <jtrzybinski>
> Subject: [none]
>
> mural idea:
> This works well with young kids. Have them stand in front of the wall in
a
> pose, possibly using props (shooting a basket with a ball, painting with
a
> paintbrush, etc.). Cast their shadow on the wall using a bright light.
> Have one or two other students use a pencil to trace the sillohuette.
Have
> students paint the drawings (solid primary colors work well for younger
> students) and add background if you wish. You can create a whole scene
> using any theme (playing sports works well). I had a student stand on a
> box and we traced his sillohuette, leaving the box out. We then added a
> jump rope in his hands as if he were in mid-jump. This can be a great
> lead-in to simple figure drawing.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 13:57:25 -0500
> From: "Stephanie Ignazio" <smi>
> Subject: Re: African American Artists
>
> Nora, You may want to tak e alook at the www.artincontext.org website
that
> has artist Faith Ringgold listed..I believe its called "any1canfly". It
> gives alot of helpful info about the artist and her work. I did my lesson
on
> Faith with my third graders. We read the story "Tar Beach" discussed the
> artists life and her chosen media of fabric (how different) etc. Then
each
> one of my third grade classes did a different take on the project. One
class
> did individual "I can Fly" quilts. We discussed what building they would
> want to own if they could fly over it..their answers ranged from zoos, to
> banks (!) to museums to the white house! One class did two large class
> murals: We had two volunteers from each group paint the bridge...then
> everyone else was designing their building from cut paper, then each
student
> designed a square resembling a quilt square to complete the edging of the
> "quilt". It was enormous but extremely effective and many diiferent
skills
> were involved so it was well worth it. Then everyone drew themselves
> flying..and we glued it all together. great results! Other classes did
> individual quilts of their own..same pricipals but designed a quilt-like
> border of 3 by 3 squares on a 18 by 24 around the 12 by 18 collage with
> markers (overwriters are great for this) in individual squares. Collage
was
> inside for building and themselves..add glitter for magical flight..very
> cute! Other classes did a larger 24 by 36 of the individual project just
> bigger and group harmonized..this works for the classrooms that need to
work
> on community harmony. All in all, the projects were fabulous and make for
a
> wonderful display. The kids really responded to the artist and her
concept
> of telling stories through her artwork about her life. I may take it one
> step further and have them design their building using the subtractive
> method of clay. Then have them draw themselves on paper and connect to
> building with a pipe cleaner. I did this at a workshop and it was very
> cute!!! The unit I am developing would incorporate storytelling, music,
> poetry and maybe drama as well as the visual arts..so if you have any
> ideas..let me know. Hope this all made sense!!
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Nora Redfern <nredfern>
> To: Stephanie Ignazio <smi>
> Date: Thursday, February 18, 1999 1:27 PM
> Subject: Re: African American Artists
>
>
> >Stephanie - That's also what I'm currently working on. I'd like to know
> >what've you've put together on Faith Ringold.
> >I made a copy of John Biggers' The Cradle and then used white-out to
> >block out much of the crosshatching. I had planned to display the large
> >print of The Cradle, then let students try their hand at crosshatching
> >on their own individual copies using charcoal or.....
> >Since I'm a first year teaching everything feels like such a gamble and
> >some ideas work and others have failed miserably. I'm working with
> >middle school students. Have you checked out The Web of Life: The ARt of
> >John Biggers website?
> >www.artsednet.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/resources/Biggers/index.html
> >I'd like to continue collaborating with you on this. Nora
> >
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 19:05:13 -0500
> From: rojul (Rosa Juliusdottir)
> Subject: Re: Can I ever catch up???
>
> By any chance is anyone else getting double and triple messages? As much
> as I like this group I really donīt like getting every message three
times!
> Best regards, Rosa
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 20:55:24 +0200
> From: The Colliers <atla>
> Subject: Re: re; cleaning paintbrushes
>
> Larry Cox wrote:
> >
> > to clean paintbrushes, no matter how grody, simply soak them in a
solution
> > of 1/2 Zout and 1/2 acetone = acrylic paint. 1/2 Zout and 1/2 paint
thinner
> > for oil. Leave them in a week, if necessary. Linda in NM
>
> I hope I don't get sued by someone for this, but soak them in Coca Cola,
> You will be amazed!!!
>
> Tracey in South Africa
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 99 16:49:45 -0500
> From: Art <t35839.us>
> Subject: Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1243
>
> >L_J_Cox
> What age are you doing scratch art with? Do you want to make your own
> scratch paper? You can do controlled or uncontrolled. Uncontrolled is
> where the students arbitrarily color areas and cover them with black
> tempera and then draw (scratch) their illustration. Controlled is where
> they sketch, make a copy, color original, paint, then transfer original
> (possibly with the straight pin poked thru onto the scratch board and
> they control what color their illustration is. An alternative is the
> thin the tempera so much that you can see thru slightly to the crayon
> drawing. Neon crayons works great, especially using the bright colorful
> photographs that you can find in Nat'l Geo as reference for the
> illustrations. Bamboo skewers from the grocery make great scratch tools.
>
> Alice Zincone
> Johnston Co. NC
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 18 Feb 1999 12:45:29 -0800
> From: Katherine Randolph <krand>
> Subject: RE: African American Artists
>
> You may also want to go to Encarta's Black History Month feature. It's
> devoted to African American achievers, and there's a section
> especially about the arts. There you'll be able to link to features from
> both Encarta encyclopedia and Encarta Africana.
> http://encarta.msn.com/events/black_history_month/arts.shtm
> there are also some special lessons in the Encarta Schoolhouse lesson
> collection. http://encarta.msn.com/schoolhouse/lessons/special.asp
> good luck
>
> Kat
>
>
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Stephanie Ignazio [smi]
> Sent: Thursday, February 18, 1999 10:57 AM
> To: Nora Redfern
> Cc: artsed
> Subject: Re: African American Artists
>
>
> Nora, You may want to tak e alook at the www.artincontext.org website
that
> has artist Faith Ringgold listed..I believe its called "any1canfly". It
> gives alot of helpful info about the artist and her work. I did my lesson
on
> Faith with my third graders. We read the story "Tar Beach" discussed the
> artists life and her chosen media of fabric (how different) etc. Then
each
> one of my third grade classes did a different take on the project. One
class
> did individual "I can Fly" quilts. We discussed what building they would
> want to own if they could fly over it..their answers ranged from zoos, to
> banks (!) to museums to the white house! One class did two large class
> murals: We had two volunteers from each group paint the bridge...then
> everyone else was designing their building from cut paper, then each
student
> designed a square resembling a quilt square to complete the edging of the
> "quilt". It was enormous but extremely effective and many diiferent
skills
> were involved so it was well worth it. Then everyone drew themselves
> flying..and we glued it all together. great results! Other classes did
> individual quilts of their own..same pricipals but designed a quilt-like
> border of 3 by 3 squares on a 18 by 24 around the 12 by 18 collage with
> markers (overwriters are great for this) in individual squares. Collage
was
> inside for building and themselves..add glitter for magical flight..very
> cute! Other classes did a larger 24 by 36 of the individual project just
> bigger and group harmonized..this works for the classrooms that need to
work
> on community harmony. All in all, the projects were fabulous and make for
a
> wonderful display. The kids really responded to the artist and her
concept
> of telling stories through her artwork about her life. I may take it one
> step further and have them design their building using the subtractive
> method of clay. Then have them draw themselves on paper and connect to
> building with a pipe cleaner. I did this at a workshop and it was very
> cute!!! The unit I am developing would incorporate storytelling, music,
> poetry and maybe drama as well as the visual arts..so if you have any
> ideas..let me know. Hope this all made sense!!
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Nora Redfern <nredfern>
> To: Stephanie Ignazio <smi>
> Date: Thursday, February 18, 1999 1:27 PM
> Subject: Re: African American Artists
>
>
> >Stephanie - That's also what I'm currently working on. I'd like to know
> >what've you've put together on Faith Ringold.
> >I made a copy of John Biggers' The Cradle and then used white-out to
> >block out much of the crosshatching. I had planned to display the large
> >print of The Cradle, then let students try their hand at crosshatching
> >on their own individual copies using charcoal or.....
> >Since I'm a first year teaching everything feels like such a gamble and
> >some ideas work and others have failed miserably. I'm working with
> >middle school students. Have you checked out The Web of Life: The ARt of
> >John Biggers website?
> >www.artsednet.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/resources/Biggers/index.html
> >I'd like to continue collaborating with you on this. Nora
> >
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #1251
> ********************************
>
> To post to the ArtsEdNet Talk Listserve, send e-mail to:
> artsednet
> *To unsubscribe from the listserv, send e-mail to:
> artsednet-request
> and type in the message area only: UNSUBSCRIBE
> *To send a message to the List-Owner, send e-mail to:
> artsednet
> *ArtsEdNet web site: http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/