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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #617

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Pamela W. Lackey (pwl_smsd.pa.us)
Fri, 27 Feb 1998 15:42:16 -0500


artsednet-digest wrote:
>
> artsednet-digest Friday, February 27 1998 Volume 02 : Number 617
>
> This edition includes :
> That strange packing material
> Re: bio-degradable space peanuts
> Re: one point perspective&pos./neg. space
> Texas art teacher -- yells HELP
> Society of Childlike Adults
> MFA Abroad
> Weekly Websites: The Arts On-line!
> Questions
> withheld
> Re: Questions
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 00:02:03 EST
> From: Stubby4B <Stubby4B>
> Subject: That strange packing material
>
> In a message dated 98-02-26 23:12:50 EST, Diane L writes:
>
> > Dear Ellyn,
> > sounds interesting, but could you be more specific on the type of packing
> > pieces you're talking about? I only know of styrofoam peanuts and shredded
> > paper. Thanks, Diane L.
>
> The packing material she is referring to is way cool. It's an environmentally
> acceptable alternative to the CFC-blown styrofoam peanuts. These things (they
> kinda resemble white cheese doodles, at least the ones I've seen) are
> actually made out of cornstarch. They can easily be identified by putting one
> under running water and seeing what happens to it - if it dissolves, it's
> cornstarch. It's neat stuff.
>
> Duffy Franco
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 07:36:39 -0500
> From: (Mark Alexander) mamjam
> Subject: Re: bio-degradable space peanuts
>
> To all interested in alternative uses of those bio-degradable corn starch
> based space peanuts that are used as a packing material:
>
> The miniature sculptures put together by moistening the ends are lots of
> fun. Last year my fifth grade made individual sculptures, then one at a
> time they attached their individual sculptures into a larger group one.
> This year I'll offer tooth picks, too, and see what happens.
>
> As many of you know, I'm the art cart man. One drawback about these
> bio-degradable space peanut sculptures is that they aren't strong nor
> durable, so I didn't want to move the sculpture after it was completed.
> The fifth grade classroom teacher, while usually quite forgiving, really
> thought I was nuts! All she saw the pile of space peanuts on her file
> cabinet! She tackfully asked that I get that mess out of her room! The
> roomfull of clamoring fifth grade sculptors helped her see the difference
> between art and trash!
>
> I have also been told that soaking them in a little water makes them
> disolve into a paste that can be used like a light weight paper mache type
> material. Another idea I've been thinking about is to cast the paste in
> modeling clay relief molds. These are ideas I haven't tried, but I have a
> box of bio-degradable space peanuts just waiting for a playful free moment.
>
> Mark
>
> Mark Alexander, 1-8 Art
> Lee H. Kellogg School
> 47 Main Street
> Falls Village, Connecticut 06031
> U.S.A.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 07:42:51 -0500
> From: Joseph Augusta <jaugusta>
> Subject: Re: one point perspective&pos./neg. space
>
> Carrie McCard wrote:
> >
> > My inquiry is about any ideas on one point perspective incorporated with
> > positive and negative space.
>
> Go here for some great perspective illusions to keep the kids
> interested:
>
> illusihttp://www.illusionworks.com/html/hall_of_illusions.html
>
> Best wishes,
> Joseph
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 04:41:13 -0700
> From: "brenda neel" <cypressnews>
> Subject: Texas art teacher -- yells HELP
>
> Hi,
> I am a Texas art teacher and we are just getting the internet set up at our school...
> Last year someone told of all the neat places to take students to on the web like
> museums. I teach grades 7-12 and would like to let the students have an opportunity
> to use the internet. If someone has time I would like to know some URL addresses
> so I can take my students places.. I am interested in museums... (and what to do
> and how
> to use it when I get there). I am also interested in art games... if there are some
> over the internet.. and last but not least my students are most interested in chat
> or e-mail... however since this is new at the school -- I am shy about letting kids
> get on chat or send e-mail to people i don't know... Last year I heard some schools
> that wanted to have e-mail pen pals and also send drawings back and forth to each
> other through regular mail?? (did anyone do this -- does it work??) Is there a
> safe place where students can chat and I don't have to fear losing my job? or should
> chat and e-mail just not be an option for the kids at this time...
>
> I need your help... If you have time please write back. If you want to write to
> me personally -- my at home e-mail address is brenda0 (the 0 is a zero)
>
>
> thanks for your time,
> brenda
> The Texas art teacher that needs HELP to learn how to use the internet with her art
> students.
>
> Free web-based email, Forever, From anywhere!
> http://www.mailexcite.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 08:23:51 +0100
> From: t35627.us (Ann Weaver)
> Subject: Society of Childlike Adults
>
> I sent a copy of the "childlike grownups society" to my principal and he
> replied with the comments in parenthesis. Made me laugh. Hope it will at
> least make you smile. He is a former music and band instructor. Ann
>
> YOU NOW BELONG TO
> > THE SOCIETY OF CHILDLIKE GROWNUPS
> >
> > AND ARE HEREBY ENTITLED TO:
> >
> > Walk in the rain, (No umbrella)
> > JUMP in mud puddles, (have you seen my yard)
> > collect rainbows, (I'll work on that one)
> > smell flowers, (I love my roses)
> > Blow bubbles, ooOoO (usually in the bathtub)
> > stop along the way, (mostly because I'm lost)
> > build sandcastles, (or mermaids)
> > watch the moon and stars come out, (I work late)
> >
> > Say HELLO to everyone, (just friendly, I guess)
> > go barefoot, (no shoes)
> > go on adventures, (does choir practice count)
> > Sing in the shower, (it's pretty bad)
> >
> > Have a Merry heart , (isn't she on Entertainment Tonight)
> > read children's books, (I do have a 3-yr-old, you know)
> > Act silly, (I get it from my mother)
> > take bubble baths, (nope, clogs the whirlpool)
> > get new sneakers, (so I can sneak up on teachers)
> > hold hands & hug & kiss, (depends on the company I'm with)
> > dance, (NOPE-Baptist!)
> >
> > Fly Kites, (only in March)
> > laugh out loud and cry out loud, (every day)
> > wander around, (I get lost alot)
> > wonder (???) about stuff, (here, that happens often)
> > Feel SCARED & sad ;-( & MAD & Happy, (pretty much covers it)
> >
> > Give up worry & guilt & shame, (what are those?)
> > stay innocent, (too late)
> > say yes and no and the magic words, (magic words?)
> > ask lots of questions, (absolutely)
> >
> > Ride bicycles, (as long as there are training wheels)
> > draw and paint and color, (I'm pretty good with a Crayloa 8-pack)
> > see things differently, (I really do need my glasses)
> > fall down and get up again, (See "ride bicycles")
> >
> > Talk with animals, (You've met some of our parents)
> > look at the sky, (not too often-it's carolina blue)
> > trust the universe, (who else can you trust)
> > STAY UP LATE, (Nope-I need my rest)
> >
> > Climb trees, (only when chasing the cat)
> > take naps, (my FAVORITE)
> > do nothing, (my second favorite)
> > daydream, (see "do nothing")
> >
> > Play with toys, (mostly Barbee)
> > play under the covers, (Nope-Ef won't let me)
> > have pillow fights, (see above)
> > learn new stuff, (I gots da Flame for Learning)
> >
> > get excited about EVERYTHING, (it's my middle name)
> > be a clown, (no comment)
> > listen to music, (you know where I stand)
> > find out how things work, (I'm still working on thermos bottles-hot,
> >cold, how does it know)
> >
> > Make up new rules, (principals LOVE rules)
> > tell stories, (there was a salesman and this farmer's daughter...)
> > save the world, (sounds like a t-shirt)
> > make friends, (you can't have too many)
> >
> > and do anything that brings more:
> >
> > happiness, celebration, relaxation,
> > communication, health, love, joy,
> > creativity, pleasure, abundance,
> > grace, self-esteem, courage,
> > balance, spontaneity, passion, peace,
> > beauty, and
> > life energy to all humans and beings of this planet.
> >
> > FURTHERMORE, the above named member is officially authorized to
> >frequent amusement parks, beaches, meadows, mountaintops, swimming pools,
> >forests, playgrounds, picnic areas, summer areas, summer camps, birthday
> >parties, circuses, bakeries, ice cream parlors, theaters, aquariums, zoos,
> >museums, planetariums, toy stores, festivals and other places where
> children
> >of all ages gather to play AND
> > is encouraged to always remember
> >
> > the motto of
> > THE SOCIETY OF CHILDLIKE GROWNUPS:
> >
> > IT'S NEVER TOO LATE
> > TO HAVE A HAPPY CHILDHOOD,
> > AND TO MAKE SURE THAT OTHERS DO
> > TOO
> >
> >To receive Joke of the Day, please email BaddTeddy
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 10:01:26 EST
> From: Stubby4B <Stubby4B>
> Subject: MFA Abroad
>
> I'm interested in getting my MFA. Does anyone know of a program abroad where
> I could do so? Summers? I'd love to be able to do it in a new environment.
> I'm more of a 3-D person, so a program in that direction would be what I'm
> after - sculpture, clay, metals, etc. I'm not quite sure where to begin my
> search, so any tips would be appreciated.
>
> Thanks so much,
>
> Duffy Franco
> Norwalk, CT
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 11:04:08 +0100
> From: t35627.us (Ann Weaver)
> Subject: Weekly Websites: The Arts On-line!
>
> I received the following information through the the PON listserve and
> thought some of you might want the information. Ann
>
> >X-Sender: ccantrill.k12.pa.us (Unverified)
> >Mime-Version: 1.0
> >X-Priority: 2 (High)
> >Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 10:47:35 -0400
> >Reply-To: Project Outreach Network Local Leadership Team <PONLLT>
> >Sender: Project Outreach Network Local Leadership Team <PONLLT>
> >From: Christina Cantrill <ccantrill.PA.US>
> >Subject: Weekly Websites: The Arts On-line!
> >To: Multiple recipients of list PONLLT <PONLLT>
> >
> >Notice the change in title from *Wednesday* to *Weekly* Websites. I hope
> >you all will allow me this flexibility (turns out that Wednesday's are not
> >always the best days for putting this work together.) So, onward and
> >upward....this week's website focus around interesting on-line projects
> >that integrate the arts in learning. This is both because education
> >through the arts is close to my heart, but more specifically to highlight
> >this great sounding project that came across my screen from the On-Line
> >Classroom (http://www.onlineclass.com/) -- DoodleOpolis:
> >
> >"On March 2, a 9-week curriculum on architecture for kids begins on the
> >Internet. Participating schools will receive by e-mail activities that get
> >kids out into the spring air to "doodle" their school, their homes and
> >their neighborhoods. Their drawings will be posted on the DoodleOpolis Web
> >site <http://www.onlineclass.com/doodle/doodle.html>.
> >
> >Architects and planners will be our on-line coaches to help the students
> >draw and understand the basics of how our towns and cities are built.
> >Classrooms will be coached through the process of building a model village
> >in their school.
> >
> >Basic concepts covered include spatial relationships, measuring, drawing,
> >perspectives, symmetry/asymmetry, decoration, focal points, etc.
> >
> >It's going to be a fun, interactive learning experience. Please do drop by
> >the Web site often to see what's going on. And if you want to join us,
> >DoodleOpolis is open to any school, grades 3 - 8, anywhere in the world!
> >(there is a basic registration fee to cover the costs).
> >
> >For a weekly schedule or for information on how to register, send an
> >e-mail to <tbt>."
> >
> >Here in Philadelphia we have also have a program called Architecture in
> >Education from the Foundation for Architecture. They have a terrific
> >website -- An Interactive Learning Center for using Architecture in the
> >Classroom (http://www.whyy.org/aie/). You can find resources of interest
> >including documentation from past projects, a gallery with student work,
> >and a list of related projects in other parts of the world.
> >
> >ArtsEdge from the Kennedy Center is a national site
> >(http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/) that brings together educators and
> >artists. They have lots of great stuff here....but I was particularily
> >interested in the link under their Webspotlight to resources created
> >on-line by students (http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/ir/kids.html).
> >
> >>From these student-made sites I found this great link to "Ready to Live:
> >>Art and Life Beyond Street Violence" via the Public Broadcasting's POV
> >>series (http://www.pbs.org/pov/jesse/). They invite all to contribute via
> >>the 'Open Mic': "How has street violence affected your life? Tell us your
> >>story in prose, poetry, music or images. Submissions may be: reflections
> >>on personal experiences responses to the threat of violence in your
> >>community tributes to people who have died."
> >
> >Another project that encourages collaboration is the World Community of
> >Old Trees -- an An Eco-Art Project in Progress by June Julian
> >(http://www.nyu.edu/projects/julian/toc.html) . Visit the Tree Gallery
> >where she includes her own work and interests and then encourages others
> >to contribute theirs. Scroll drown for Eco-Art projects done by students
> >all over the world. I found this via the Progressive Arts Links
> >(http://www.europa.com/~stream/arts.html) which has a ton of interesting
> >resources.
> >
> >Blue Web'n (http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/bluewebn/index.html) promotes
> >Internet projects and is a terrific general resource that is sorted by
> >content area. Take a look at the Art section
> >(http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/bluewebn/fr_Arts.html) for some really
> >interesting projects, including:
> >
> >Eyes on Arts promote many on and off-line projects around the arts. One,
> >called Eyes of the Beholder promotes "a collaborative activity to promote
> >a community of seers" (http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/art/beholder.html)
> >
> >Another is called Windmills to Whirligigs
> >(http://www.sci.mus.mn.us/sln/vollis/) which explores the connections
> >between science, art and knowledge created by the Science Museum of
> >Minnesota.
> >
> >The World of Puppets (K-2 curriculum) can be found at
> >http://www.itdc.sbcss.k12.ca.us/curriculum/puppetry.html and take students
> >around the world to look at puppetry, then reflect on what they've found,
> >write their own stories and create their own puppets and then perform
> >their own show. They also have links where you can share your puppets and
> >stories on-line.
> >
> >Some other general art-oriented sites include:
> >
> >Art in the Public Interest
> >(http://www.artswire.org/highperf/api/APIothersites.html)
> >
> >ArtsEdNet at the Getty Foundation (http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/) has
> >some really nice on-line resources, especially for discipline-based arts
> >education. My favorite is their online exhibition and discussion.
> >Currently you'll find "The Web of Life: The Art of John Biggers"
> >(http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/resources/Biggers/index.html)
> >with on-line discussion, curriculum resources, conversations with the
> >artists, interactive galleries, ect.
> >
> >Open Studio: Arts On-line (http://www.openstudio.org/) Open Studio: The
> >Arts Online creates a laboratory for the exploration of the tools and
> >techniques that will serve arts and cultural organizations as they prepare
> >for the networked environment of the next century. Their site also has a
> >huge list of art sites (http://www.openstudio.org/sites.html)
> >
> >And, once again, a general link to a Kathy Schrock Art and Architecture
> >resource (http://www.capecod.net/schrockguide/arts/artarch.htm)! (I just
> >love Kathy :-)
> >
> >Enjoy!
> >
> >Christina
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >.......................
> >Christina Hill Cantrill
> >
> >Wednesday Websites are archived and can be be found on-line at
> >http://www.philaedfund.org/websites.html
> >
> >*Please note: If you'd rather not be on this email list, please let me
> >know and I will remove you from future mailings. Or if you'd like to add
> >someone to the list, please send me their email and affiliation. Thank
> >you!
> >
> >Philadelphia Education Fund
> >http://www.philaedfund.org/
> >
> >ccantrill.pa.us
> >http://www.netcom.com/~chc
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 11:28:13 +0100
> From: t35627.us (Ann Weaver)
> Subject: Questions
>
> 1. Do any of you have classroom teachers who keep kids from art class to
> finish classroom work?
>
> 2. For those of you who have done murals with K-5 kids, how did you handle
> the project? I have done murals with kids and feel that the work should be
> as much their own as possible; that their renderings are appropriate for an
> elementary school. The largest mural my kids(375) did used a nature theme
> and each child made a sketch for his/her part which was incorporated into
> the total design. My older students painted the background and each child
> painted his/her contribution using the sketches they had prepared. They
> drew with chalk so they could correct themselves easily before they
> applied paint. I have had criticism from a few non-arts folks who thought
> the work didn't look professional. My response was that kids weren't
> professionals and their work would not look like an adult's work. I
> thought it was wonderful - full of birds, butterflies, fish, frogs,
> mammals, flowers, trees.....naive. Some of our schools have hired
> professional artists to do their murals(spent $10,000 at one school). I
> feel that it gives children ownership and pride to create their own. Other
> art teachers have done the drawing and allowed students to paint inside the
> lines. Some of the drawings have incorporated the work of students(thank
> goodness). Some have relied on tracing work from books, magazines. There
> is one school in our district who had a parent paint Disney characters all
> over their media center. Never heard of copywrites, I suppose. Our
> schools are site based managed and there is no county policy, although our
> art network has requested one. I've rambled enough - What do you think?
>
> Thanks, Ann
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 12:13:56 -0500
> From: Louise <lutton.us>
> Subject: withheld
>
> >1. Do any of you have classroom teachers who keep kids from art class to
> >finish classroom work?
>
> If I know this is happening I usually send a kid back to class to get the
> student. Would they hold a kid out of science or math in order to finish
> other work?
>
> Louise
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 27 Feb 1998 10:24:12 +0000
> From: Christine Merriam <ktwnldy.az.us>
> Subject: Re: Questions
>
> Ann asked:
> >1. Do any of you have classroom teachers who keep kids from art class >to finish classroom work?
>
> Our school has made it a policy, and it is in the Teachers Handbook,
> that the "specials" are required classes just like reading, math, etc.
> If a student is to miss that class both teachers must agree ahead of
> time. This also means that I cannot send a student back to class...
> but if needed, I can send them to the office.
>
> Every once in a while someone forgets about this, and it is great to
> have it in the handbook and have the support of the principal.
>
> Christine Merriam
> Kayenta Intermediate School
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #617
> *******************************
>
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> *ArtsEdNet web site: http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/
To Stubby 4B regarding information on MFA programs. If you are a
TEACHER and only have your summers off: I am in a program at Maryland
Institute, College of Art, that is an MFA for art educators. You must
have 5 years of teaching experience, be a working artist, and have a
body of work. It is part time: meaning you live in Baltimore for 6
weeks in the summer. They give you a studio and a mentor. YOu have an
art history seminar, and art ed seminar, but most of time is spent in
the studio and in critiques. They are a painting school, but they do
have sculptors in the program. Right now a stone carver, and lots of
people doing mixed media, or what they like to call 2 1/2-D. There
aren't many really good programs like this one anywhere on the planet,
plus, not to mention all the incredible fun we all have in the summer!
Pam L. Art teacher at Boiling Springs H.S. Pa.
pwl_smsd.pa.us