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Lesson Plans


Re:Classroom Management

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Rosa Juliusdottir (rojul)
Fri, 13 Feb 1998 13:21:30 -0500


I very much agree with you Sandra and I have noticed like you: "that many
chronically disruptive students,some of whom are also having academic
problems,are frequently gifted at drawing?" I also think your idea
of:"connection between strong visual-kinesthetic-tactile learners, who
might be likely to have reading, writing and spelling >difficulties, and
misbehavior due to frustration in the classroom" is very likely correct.
And to your third comment the one about "positive reinforcement" I know
from my own experience(18 years of teaching art) that it is the most
effective way to redirect misbehavior. I believe we do not put strong
enough emphasis on this in teaching in general. As far as:"I wish I knew
of better ways to capitalize on the strong drawing skills of my problem
students as well as how to help them learn how to use those drawing skills
to improve academically" I often feel the same way, but as I teach in a
special Art School for children (within a regular School of Visual Arts) I
do not have the same discipline problems, but yet I have had experience
where praise and positive reinforcement has moved mountains so to speak and
problem students(meaning problem students in their regular school) have
found the right path for them in the Arts and the problems have lessened or
gone away.
Regards from the far north, Rosa

>Has anyone besides me noticed that many chronically disruptive students,
>some of whom are also having academic problems, are frequently gifted at
>drawing? I believe I see a connection between strong
>visual-kinesthetic-tactile >learners, who might be likely to have reading,
>writing and spelling >difficulties, and misbehavior due to frustration in
>the classroom. Therefore I >don't think giving them an alternative art
>reading or writing assignment is >always effective - it
>just gets them more frustrated and more likely to misbehave. Scientific
>research has shown that positive reinforcement is the most effective way
>to redirect behavior. Negative reinforcement may stop the specific
>behavior being punished, but often the student will simply evolve into
>another form of misbehavior. I wish I knew of better ways to capitalize
>on the strong drawing skills of my problem students as well as how to
>help them learn how to use those drawing skills to improve academically.
>
>--
>Sandra Hildreth
>C.L.A.S.S. (Cultural Literacy through Art & Social Studies)
>http://www.northnet.org/mwcsart/mwart.htm
>Art 7-12, Madrid-Waddington Central School, Madrid, NY 13660
>Art Methods, St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY 13617