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Lesson Plans


classroom management or misunderstanding forms of resistance?

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
kmt127
Tue, 10 Feb 1998 12:07:18 -0600


Much of the discourse on classroom management has focused on the punishment
of disruptive students, neglecting the more important questions around why
students are disruptive. Even more disturbing is the need for educators to
use studio production as a reward and textual work (reading and writing
about art) as punishment. What does this do to reinforce the the dichotomy
between art, as pleasure, frill, and entertainment, and discourse about
art, book work, study, reading and writing, as illegitimate hard work which
has little to do with pleasure? Does this reify the notions that those
engaged in researching and writting about art history, art theory and
critical discourse are less productive, creative, and important than those
making art (see a number of responses to this listserve)? Does it
reinforce the notion that art is about doing and not thinking? Does it
come close to seeking the underlying reasons why a student is rebelling?
So why are students rebelling? Is it based upon a condemnation of
underlying repressive ideologies that characterize schooling in general?
In order to address classroom management we must move away from archaic
forms of discipline and punishment and try to understand why students are
resisting certain forms of pedagogy. Can we not discuss how artists
(some) resist forms of oppression and rebel through their work, in so
providing a language for students to use when critiquing certain forms of
schooling?

Busy work, reading and writing as punishment, and feeding crackers to
students , as if they were a k-9 salivating at the sound of a bell,
transmit and legitimate the structure and ideology of schooling as a site
of useless information and textual knowledge as punishment while limiting
the potential to readdress student resistance into critical processes of
challenging the status quo.

Kevin Michael Tavin Ph.D. Candidate
Dept. of Art Education
The Pennsylvania State University
School of Visual Arts


  • Maybe reply: Maggie White: "Re: classroom management or misunderstanding forms of resistance?"
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