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Lesson Plans


Re: Art history question

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Teresa Tipton (ttipton.wa.us)
Sun, 23 Feb 1997 10:38:08 -0800 (PST)

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Holes were drilled and iron rods with ends that looped over themselves
inserted into the holes to hold the relief sculptural slabs in place. You
can see the holes today in architecture that is still standing. A good
example of this is in Rome at the Parthenon.

Teresa Tipton

On Sun, 23 Feb 1997, carla harwitt wrote:

> One of my art history students asked me a question, and I wonder if anyone
> out there has the answer. During the Aegean Art period a structure was
> built called the Lion's Gate at Myceneae. It is notable for, among other
> reasons, being one of the earliest structures to have a thin, separately
> carved relief slab attached over the doorway. In other words, instead of
> this "pre-pediment" kind of relief sculpture having been carved into a
> huge structural stone, the architect left that area uncarved and then
> placed over the doorway a separate carved slab.
>
> The question my students asked me was, "How was that slab attached?" I
> don't know the answer to that. Can anyone out there help me?
>
> --Carla in LA
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