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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #91

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Joanne L Vanbezooyen (vanbezoo)
Thu, 6 Feb 1997 18:19:52 -0700 (MST)

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On the rainstick idea...you'll need to put a "filter material to slow
the flow of beans...shredded paper?...several thin sticks?

On Thu, 6 Feb
1997 owner-artsednet-digest wrote:

>
> artsednet-digest Thursday, 6 February 1997 Volume 02 : Number 091
>
> This edition includes:
> Re: Student teachers
> Re: Large Slabs
> Re: rainsticks
> keeping slabs from cracking
> CELEBRATING PLURALISM & Style Emulation
> Re: rainsticks
> Re: Re[2]: CELEBRATING PLURALISM & Storyteller doll DIRECTIONS
> Re: rainsticks
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> From: Teresa Tipton <ttipton.wa.us>
> Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 11:24:25 -0800 (PST)
> Subject: Re: Student teachers
>
> I think we read too much of our expectations into the demeanor of others.
> Instead of finding what's wrong with this emerging teacher, what can you
> find that's right, to encourage them to continue to grow and develop and
> become the "teacher you want them to be?"
>
> Maybe this person is depressed. Student teaching can be an
> incredibly overwhelming experience and perhaps they are
> internalizing their inabilities to be "perfect" as a
> self-deprecation. The culture is very good at modeling this for us.
>
> Instead of holding them up to your standard and judging them AGAINST it,
> perhaps you can try to find out what issues they're wrestling
> with. Student teaching is a difficult, trying time when you realize you
> don't know shit about teaching and your training has ill-prepared you for
> dealing with the complexities of multi-leveled abilities, backgrounds and
> experiences. Encouragement will reap more rewards than critical judgments.
>
> One of my student teaching supervisors was a fashion prima donna whose
> idea of art was copying John Nagey "Learn to Draw" lessons and replicating
> them with her high school students. Everything I did was antithecal to
> her way of teaching and her silent judgments registered more than her
> verbal remarks (which by the way is what the research supports - we
> remember the non-verbal and "hear" that over the verbal...)
>
> Her assessment of me at the end was that I should to a department store,
> get a make-over, get new clothes, and for god's
> sakes, shave your legs, and while you're at it, forget about becoming a
> teacher and go back to school and become a studio artist where you'll be
> happiest because you have no talent for teaching.
>
> Needless to say, as upset as I was by her "assessment" I ignored her
> "advice" and am successful with kids as a teacher because I am different.
> I am an artist first and a teacher second. I am a non-linear anarchist in
> a linear system and the kids love it because I relate to them as people
> not a judgmental authority figure.
>
> My advice to you is to try and reach this person where they're at, and
> model where you'd like them to be without imposing your judgments on them.
>
> - -Regards,
> Teresa Tipton
>
>
>
> On Wed, 5 Feb 1997, smurthwaite wrote:
>
> > Re: makeup on student teacher
> >
> > OK, OK, OK. I won't mention makeup or hair. I would like to send her
> > away for a make-over or light a fire under her. Her content is coming
> > along slowly but surely. She just looks like she's depressed and talks
> > very softly. I want excitement about a project, contagious enthusiasm,
> > the feeling of fun, fun, fun, more smiles. The kids know how you feel.
> > It makes a difference. Will she learn that? Maybe, maybe not. I'm
> > worried about sending her out to sell herself in this job market.
> > Oh well, I'm just venting. Back to work.
> >
> > Blessila
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> From: Teresa Tipton <ttipton.wa.us>
> Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 11:43:10 -0800 (PST)
> Subject: Re: Large Slabs
>
> Donna - are you asking me this question in reference to my post on the use
> of "Claymache?"
>
> If so, I wouldn't try to make something this large out of either wonder
> bread clay or clamache. You're right - they will crack. Why don't you just
> use clay for something this large?
>
> The only thing that comes to mind is reinforcing the material with chicken
> wire inside, which is what I do for large scale papermache projects. But
> it sounds to me like the selection of material does not match its use.
>
> Regards,
> Teresa
>
> On Thu, 6 Feb 1997, Donna Lyle wrote:
>
> > How do I keep large slabs from cracking? (3 ft x 2 ft) I dryed
> > slowly I thought. But it cracks! Do I lay it on wood, or what?
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> From: Teresa Tipton <ttipton.wa.us>
> Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 11:45:53 -0800 (PST)
> Subject: Re: rainsticks
>
> You can make rainsticks with long cardboard tubes - best are the heavier
> ones from printers; tape one end; fill with a couple of
> handfulls of (uncooked) beans; tape and paint.
>
> Of course you would want to introduce their culture origins, use and
> motifs prior to the activity.
>
> - -Teresa Tipton
>
> On Thu, 6 Feb 1997 stratk_6 wrote:
>
> > Does anyone have directions on how to make a rainstick?
> > T.I.A.
> > -Lisa Schaa
> > stratk_6
> >
> >
> >
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> From: shampi07
> Date: 6 Feb 1997 21:17:07 -0000
> Subject: keeping slabs from cracking
>
> Linda,
> I am a pottery concentration and I was told that rolling cheese cloth
> into the clay with a rolling pin helps to keep it from cracking. I have
> never actually tried it, but I was told that it works! Good Luck!
> -Rebecca
> Student teacher
> Potsdam/SLU
>
> ------------------------------
>
> From: MARY.ERICKSON (Mary Erickson)
> Date: Thu, 06 Feb 1997 14:33:53 -0700
> Subject: CELEBRATING PLURALISM & Style Emulation
>
> I've been following this discussion stimulated by a storyteller doll lesson
> with great interest. Like many others, I have been trying to figure out
> when making an artwork that looks something like the artwork of someone
> from another culture is good art education and when it is not. I think
> this practice of making something "in the style of" another is also an
> issue in understanding historical work in one's own culture. What are
> students learning when they make "Gothic style" tissue paper windows or
> "Cubist style" self portraits? Or "Pop Art" style" tennis shoe sculptures?
> Maybe we can't know whether students have trivialized the art they
> emulate merely by seeing the students' artwork. Aren't the objectives of
> the lesson crucial in assessing both the value and effectiveness of the
> lesson?
>
> I've been collaborating with a group of elementary, middle, and high school
> teachers over the last several years. This is an issue that has come up
> repeatedly in our reflections. At the end of our research study last year
> we began to hypothesize about just what might be the focal point of
> transfer when students between art history and art making. Earlier
> participants in this ArtsEdNet discussion have already mentioned that
> techniques and visual style are two points of transfer. Meaning or
> significance is another point of transfer. This may be what some have
> called "themes." Liza Bergman, a middle school art teacher with whom I'm
> collaborating, has argued that young people benefit from learning about and
> practicing the artworld conventions of their own and other cultures. This
> year the collaborating teachers are looking into that possibility.
>
> This year we've been investigating the effectiveness of instruction about
> cultures and artworlds. We're focusing on the effect of such instruction
> 1) on young people's ability to formulate meaningful questions about
> unfamiliar artworks and 2) on young people's ability to reflect on their
> own art making. In our study we've focused on the artworlds of Sung
> Dynasty China and of Classical Greece. We're comparing the important
> artworld people and place; ideas and beliefs; and activities with the
> Chinese and Greek artworlds with the students' own school artworls and with
> the Metropolitan Phoenix Artworld. Our study includes introductions to the
> notions of "culture" and "artworld", art history and art making activities,
> and letter writing campaigns to people in the artworlds of Metropolitan
> Phoenix. The unit culminates with a trip to the Asian collection at the
> Phoenix Art Museum.
>
> Early on I urged teachers to ask students to make artworks in which they
> applied what they learned either to their own lives or to some imaginary
> situation. I discouraged asking students to make artworks that emulate the
> style of either Chinese or Greek art. The art teachers with whom I worked
> wanted to ask students to try out some of the brush work conventions of
> China in their own painting and to work with Greek vase painting
> figure/ground conventions working with clay. In the dry run of the unit
> plan, the teachers also taught a lesson in which students invented fantasy
> artworlds and conventions of the future as motivation for their own art
> making. This latter activity had several additional layers of complexity,
> and we eliminated it from the research study now under way. The students'
> pretest and post test writing and interviews may shed some light on whether
> the practice of asking students to knowingly use conventions of another
> time or culture results in better questions asking and more sophisticated
> reflection on art making. I hope so.
>
> Can US business people learn and emulate effective practices from Japanese
> companies respectfully? Can school and community group be inspired to try
> the "talking circle" communication process of some Native Americans
> without trivialization? From whom should one seek permission to study and
> try out the fresco techniques and compositional devices of the Renaissance?
> I don't pretend to know the answers to all these questions, but I'm not
> sure the answer is that there are no good art activities that involve
> student making artworks that look something like the artworks of people of
> other times and cultures. I'm just not sure teachers can always manage to
> "get permission" as Graeme has advised. Maybe we can discuss alternative
> criteria teachers might use to help determine whether an emulation ideas
> they're considering is both worthwhile and respectful of the originating
> culture. Our collaborating research group is making its decision about
> which art making activities to implement based by taking a hard look at the
> objectives those activities are intended to address.
>
> If any one made it to the end of this horribly long message, thanks for
> listening.
>
> Mary Erickson
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> From: smurthwaite <smrthwt>
> Date: Thu, 06 Feb 1997 18:32:16 -0500
> Subject: Re: rainsticks
>
> stratk_6 wrote:
> >
> > Does anyone have directions on how to make a rainstick?
> > T.I.A.
> > -Lisa Schaa
> > stratk_6
>
> There are many ways to make a rain stick. The last one I made at the
> NEAEA Conf. with with a firm tube, we nailed about 60 nails into the
> tube from all directions. We glued Kraft paper circles onto one side
> and poored fish tank gravel into the tube. We glued a Kraft paper
> circle onto the other end. We then paper mache'd brown Kraft paper (or
> torn paper bags) all over the tube. We then cut black paper designs and
> put them all over the wet paper mache'd tube. It turned out great. I
> did it with 4th graders last summer at camp.
>
> Also I saw the girl scouts making them by spiraling wadded up tinfoil
> into a paper towel tube and decorating them. I plan on making them like
> this with first graders this year since they study Africa.
>
> Question: Are rain sticks from South American and Africa? Seems I've
> seen real ones from both continents.
>
> Good luck.
>
> Kelly in CT
>
> ------------------------------
>
> From: p-lstudio (betti longinotti)
> Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 18:32:32 -0500
> Subject: Re: Re[2]: CELEBRATING PLURALISM & Storyteller doll DIRECTIONS
>
> I really haven't been keeping up with this particular discussion, but
> the words apprenticeship within the public school classroom caught my
> attention. I just completed teaching within an apprenticeship
> construct, and have done so once prior within a public school classroom.
> The first situation was initially inspired by an artist in residency
> experience that brought artist, Tim Rollins to my very own classroom.
> SECCA a local museum through numerous grants secured funds for this
> experience. It was by this experience that mentored my idea to secure
> funding to create a stained glass studio out of my middle school
> classroom, where I taught "At Risk" youth. There were many times when I
> hestitated or doubted my success, but it did happen and was highly
> rewarding. I would have to say that this apprenticeship experience was
> non-traditional, in that the students participated in completing an
> architectural installation through all facets, from design through
> fabrication, painting, etc.
> The second situation, which I just completed was within a program of
> our local Arts Council's outreach program. Here I worked with high
> school students, again creating an architectural installation of stained
> glass. The studio was already present within our local art center,
> which was gracious in allowing us to utilize it.
> The key is in allowing the students to work collaboratively, and closely
> monitoring progress. The art students should be involved in every
> aspect of the creation of the artwork, unlike traditional modes of
> apprenticeship. It can happen successfully, and it is a rich learning
> and teaching experience, mutual to student artist and teacher artist.
>
> Yours in Art & Life,
> Betti L.
> p-lstudio
>
> ------------------------------
>
> From: dngart.us (Deborah Gilbert)
> Date: Thu, 6 Feb 1997 16:23:25 -0700 (MST)
> Subject: Re: rainsticks
>
> >You can make rainsticks with long cardboard tubes - best are the heavier
> >ones from printers; tape one end; fill with a couple of
> >handfulls of (uncooked) beans; tape and paint.
>
> Last year, I made them with third graders. We started with the heavy tubes
> from a printer and hammered thin nails into the sides, in a spiral pattern.
> The more nails you put in, the longer the "rain" will go on. We also used
> dry beans inside, before closing off both ends with rounds of tagboard and
> tape. Then the students studied African motifs and practiced with
> different stamping materials before patterning pieces of paper, which were
> then glued to the outside of the tube. I had raffia, feathers, leather
> lacing and beads and let students embellish as they wished. They looked
> beautiful and sounded very soothing when played.
>
> Deborah
> Altura Elementary
> Aurora, Colorado
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #91
> ******************************
>
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Joanne Van Bezooyen 11220 Via Madre E.
Univ. of Arizona Art Education. Tucson, Arizona 85749
vanbezoo 520-749-1685


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