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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: January 30, 2011 [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

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From: Poland, Amanda (Amanda.Poland_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Feb 02 2011 - 01:56:36 PST


Hi All
What about house swaps in other countries? Not necessarily a job swap. Not sure what time of year would suit those in US? As I am no longer an art teacher, now working in education in a Gallery, I am more flexible, although more limited with time away from work (would travel as family of 4).
Cheers
Amanda

Canberra
 ACT 2600 AUSTRALIA
Telephone
61 2 6102 7062
Facsimile
61 2 6102 7001
www.portrait.gov.au
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest [mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Monday, 31 January 2011 7:01 PM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: January 30, 2011

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Sunday, January 30, 2011.

1. Guidelines for Para-Professionals in the Art Studio
2. Re: teacherartexchange digest: January 29, 2011
3. housing swaps ?
4. Re: housing swaps ?
5. Artists and Folktales
6. Re: Artists who depict folktales
7. Re: teacherartexchange digest: January 29, 2011
8. Re: teacherartexchange digest: January 29, 2011
9. Re: Artists and Folktales

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Subject: Guidelines for Para-Professionals in the Art Studio
From: Margaret Angstadt <mangstadt@rssu.org>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 15:33:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Greetings All!

I am creating a "para-professional guidelines document" (below) and
your help is appreciated. Any and all suggestions are welcomed.
Adults who are one-on-one aids all have a different 'take' on what it
means to be in an art room. What they think might be helpful is often
very detrimental to students.
Or, perhaps some of you already have such a document you'd care to share?

We're 3 days into the new semester and I'm now full time -- a BIG
CHANGE for me! So I'm trying to get all my 'ducks lined up' now...
In advance -- THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!
Peggy

Para-Professionals in the Art Studio

Welcome to the art studios!

It is important that within the first week or two of class we discuss
common goals for the identified student(s). These goals will be
expanded for each unit of study and our common approach is crucial to
student success in the visual arts.

While convergent thinking is often the norm in education, here we
encourage divergent thinking. The art studio is an environment that
encourages skill development, reflection and critique, making
connections to other areas, and experimentation and creativity [or
"thinking outside the box"]. In this environment, students are
encouraged to think independently and act on their own hypothesis and
shared goals. What some consider "mistakes" and/or "failures" are
inherent in art-making, part of the creative process and to be
expected.

We desire the most positive experience for each student in the
independent creation of personal artwork. To this end we request that
student work be just that: work done solely by the student. Please do
not work on, nor physically assist, the student in any manner unless
prescribed by the individual education plan. A more helpful approach
is to alert the art teacher (in a discrete manner) to particular
struggles the student may be experiencing.

Interactions with students

Students are often afraid to 'make mistakes' and look for re-assurance
throughout the creative process. Many would rather have YOU do their
work. Please avoid this trap. Rather than telling a student to 'try
this' or 'change this', please ask questions related to student work
that do NOT elicit a 'yes' or 'no' answer.

The following statements are suggested to encourage discussion with
ALL students:
"What are you trying to accomplish right now?"
"How do you intend to accomplish this?"
"What do you need to know in order to be able to do this?"
"What have you learned that might help you in this decision?"
"Where might you be able to find help?"

If you would like to tell the student you "like" their art work,
attempt to be specific to the lesson. For instance you can 'notice
something' from the lesson they have incorporated with statements such
as:

"I notice that you have created strong walls in your clay slab work
because you used the "four S's" when joining the clay."
"I notice that you used the suggestions for texture in your drawing.
How do you think it has improved the drawing?"
"I recognize the color scheme/harmony you have chosen. What factors
influenced your decision in color choice?"

Interactions with the teacher.

Please be discrete when discussing your student and your student's
needs with the art teacher before, during, or after class. While
whispered tones may draw more attention than a normal tone of voice,
please note that students see all and hear all, including comments
about your student or about other students' behaviors or artwork. We
all want the art studios to be a safe environment.
If the teacher is not available for direct help, and you would like to
help the student, please MODEL the technique on a separate paper or on
a separate piece of clay.

Critiques, quizzes, homework

Individual education plans will frame student participation in these
assessment venues. Please keep the art teacher apprised of any
difficulty your student has in these areas.

Para-professional artwork

Many who assist in the art room have a hard time 'observing' and want
to enter into the fun! If it is determined that your student is
functioning independently and successfully, you are welcome to
participate. Here are a few guidelines:

Keep your goals simple and small. If classes are large and storage
space is limited, please store your work in a space other than the
studio. Please do not allow your work to be more important than your
student's work by drawing attention to your work. Please do not enter
into class discussions unless invited by the teacher. Your 'always
correct input' can unintentionally stifle student participation.

We look forward to working with you and your student!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: January 29, 2011
From: tara franzese <artmuse67@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 18:57:40 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

> 1. Re: house swap
> 2. National Art Education Honor Society?
> 3. Artists who depict folktales

Hi all,
Does anyone know any artists who use folktales as inspiration for
their art? I'm doing a lesson on Paul Klee's 'Sinbad the Sailor' and
wanted to show the students some other images of artists who derive
inspiration from folktales/stories in their artwork.
Any ideas?

Thanks!
-Tara

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Subject: housing swaps ?
From: ruth campbell <campbellruthscott@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 17:29:48 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 3

Hi again,
Great  to see so much interest in house/studio swaps.
I'll  will work on some sort of data base- not sure how a techie would do it,
but I guess I'll just compile names & places, and send a "join us"
request to the list now and then as it grows.  List could be emailed on request.
What do you (all) think of the idea of offering our school emails for contact,
to avoid the spammers, and hesitation of posting more info like phone, etc on
list? Personal choice I suppose--

I  have a further question....my principals have always encouraged
me to try "guest teacher" swaps== maybe it would be a way to
bring a "visiting artist" to our schools, and have a "paid vacation"
I don't see any cost to anyone's district--boy would I like to bring
"my show" to Hawaii for 2 weeks, or maybe....Kansas !
For example: I do a lot with clay, and think my students could really benefit
from a visiting teacher that does printmaking. I have a decent
press, but little skill ( or inclination).

Fun to hear all your places of abode..Keep that ball rolling!

Ruth

      

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Subject: Re: housing swaps ?
From: Linda Kieling <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 18:28:57 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

Ruth, that's awesome. Thank you for putting this out there and pulling
it together. I think sending information directly to you would be
better. Then specific info isn't public. Is that ok?

I think name, places with a short description of accommodations (how
many bedrooms, etc.) along with preferred contact information. Maybe
areas you are interested in seeing. Being in the Pacific Northwest I
would want to contact people interested in coming here, not just where
I'd like to go. Make sense?

After it is compiled it should be e-mail off list just as you said.
Then folks could communicate amongst themselves to work out
arrangements.

Swapping classrooms sounds intriguing, also. Not sure how that would
work, but I have a big, new Skutt kiln and I love printmaking :-)

Thanks again.
creatively, Linda
(middle school in Oregon)

On Sun, Jan 30, 2011 at 5:29 PM, ruth campbell
<campbellruthscott@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Hi again,
> Great  to see so much interest in house/studio swaps.
> I'll  will work on some sort of data base- not sure how a techie would do it,
> but I guess I'll just compile names & places, and send a "join us"
> request to the list now and then as it grows.  List could be emailed on request.
> What do you (all) think of the idea of offering our school emails for contact,
> to avoid the spammers, and hesitation of posting more info like phone, etc on
> list? Personal choice I suppose--
>
> I  have a further question....my principals have always encouraged
> me to try "guest teacher" swaps== maybe it would be a way to
> bring a "visiting artist" to our schools, and have a "paid vacation"
> I don't see any cost to anyone's district--boy would I like to bring
> "my show" to Hawaii for 2 weeks, or maybe....Kansas !
> For example: I do a lot with clay, and think my students could really benefit
> from a visiting teacher that does printmaking. I have a decent
> press, but little skill ( or inclination).
>
> Fun to hear all your places of abode..Keep that ball rolling!
>
> Ruth
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Artists and Folktales
From: Kris Wetterlund <krisw@sandboxstudios.org>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 20:47:21 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Brancusi's Golden Bird was inspired by a Romanian folktale about a dazzling bird called the Maiastra. He returned to the form of the bird again and again. To learn more about the folk tale that inspired Brancusi, check out a resource for families at the Art Institute of Chicago's site:

http://www.artic.edu/aic/education/CC/index.html

Click on "Story Time" and then "The Golden Bird" for an interactive version of the story for kids.

Kris Wetterlund
Sandbox Studios
Education * Technology * Art
2520 Colfax Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN 55405
V: 612-986-1360
F: 612-377-4848
kris@sandboxstudios.org
www.sandboxstudios.org

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Subject: Re: Artists who depict folktales
From: Judy Decker <jdecker4art@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 21:56:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

Greetings Tara and all,

What about well known children's book illustrators? Marcia Brown is an
excellent choice. She has illustrated many folktales. Tomie dePaola
has also illustrated many world folk tales. I know this isn't what you
were looking for....

Marc Chagall might work for you. Much of Chagall's work draws upon
childhood memories and Russian folk tales.

Many African folk tales are portrayed in their art ---- again -- not
what you are looking for.....

Hope this helps....

Judy Decker

P.S. If anyone posts a reply, remember to remove my email address.
Digest users, if you post a reply, remove the rest of the digest from
your post and change the subject line to something that matches your
post.

On Sun, Jan 30, 2011 at 6:57 PM, tara franzese wrote:

> Hi all,
> Does anyone know any artists who use folktales as inspiration for
> their art?  I'm doing a lesson on Paul Klee's 'Sinbad the Sailor' and
> wanted to show the students some other images of artists who derive
> inspiration from folktales/stories in their artwork.
> Any ideas?
>
> Thanks!
> -Tara

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: January 29, 2011
From: Linda Kieling <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 19:11:50 -0800
X-Message-Number: 7

Do you mean illustrators like Kitty Kitson Petterson (Why The Rabbit
Is Wild Today, Uncle Monday and Other Florida Tales)?

Or more like Chagall's work -- although he said " There is nothing
anecdotal in my pictures - no fairy tales - no literature in the sense
of folk-legend associations. "

and Jacob Lawrence "As in his previous series, Lawrence adopted the
tempo and pulse of folktales to create a visual analogue to the
African American oral tradition"

This site says "throughout history, artists have been inspired by
myths and legends and have given them visual form."
artsmia.org/world-myths/

The Muskegon Museum of Art had an exhibit in 2010 called "Mirror,
Mirror: Art Inspired by Fairy Tales"

good luck~
creatively, Linda
(middle school in Oregon)

 >>>>>I'm doing a lesson on Paul Klee's 'Sinbad the Sailor' and wanted
to show the students some other images of artists who derive
inspiration from folktales/stories in their artwork.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: January 29, 2011
From: Susan Lang <tuciaobella@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 20:06:57 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 8

If anyone likes the southeast coast and golf, I have a house just outside
Wilmington, NC that is in a golf community. Several beaches are a thirty to
forty minute drive.

Suz

________________________________
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Sun, January 30, 2011 3:01:04 AM
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: January 29, 2011

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, January 29, 2011.

1. Re: house swap
2. National Art Education Honor Society?

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Subject: Re: house swap
From: "Meg Spielman Peldo" <megsp@cableone.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 08:45:24 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

I have a house and a downtown studio in Fargo, ND - LOL in case anyone has
watching the movie Fargo in Fargo on their bucket list!
Meg

----- Original Message -----
From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Saturday, January 29, 2011 2:00 AM
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: January 28, 2011

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Friday, January 28, 2011.
>
> 1. Re: Swap?
> 2. summer home exchange
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Swap?
> From: Krystal Murphy <krystalrm@yahoo.com>
> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 10:10:10 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> I am definitely interested in this. I have a house in a mountain town
> outside of Boise, log cabin with a full loft and 3 min walk to a private
> hotsprings. Amazing sledding hill, Sun Valley skiing and a plethora of
> hotsprings in this area. I summer in northwest Montana, beautiful,
> beautiful, close to Canada and Glacier, both places are available.
>
> --- On Wed, 1/26/11, Meryl <scmeryl@aol.com> wrote:
>
>> From: Meryl <scmeryl@aol.com>
>> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Swap?
>> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
>> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>> Date: Wednesday, January 26, 2011, 2:32 PM
>> I would be interested in the house
>> swap too. We have a house near the beach in Charleston,SC
>> and one in Asheville,NC mountains
>> Meryl
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jan 26, 2011, at 11:21 AM, Linda Kieling <go4art@juno.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>> > What a cool idea! Love it! I am in the beautiful
>> pacific northwest
>> > just outside Portland, Oregon. We also have a place on
>> the Oregon
>> > coast. Michele, I was on Salt Spring Island two
>> summers ago for a
>> > workshop with Nick Bantok and it was fabulous! Maybe
>> the information
>> > could be compiled off list, then distributed off list
>> for individuals
>> > to work out swap dates, etc. Ruth, were you wanting to
>> do that or were
>> > you looking for someone else to make the list?
>> >
>> > creatively,
>> > Linda
>> >
>> > from Ruth:
>> > Would there be any interest in creating a "list" of
>> art educators who
>> > might want to swap homes and possibly use of sudios
>> for vacation?
>> >
>> > ---
>> > To unsubscribe go to
>> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: summer home exchange
> From: Richard GROSS <ralight@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Fri, 28 Jan 2011 19:44:50 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Hi All,
>
> I have a 4 bedroom, 2 bath Eichler in Marin County, which is half way
> between San Francisco and Napa (wine country in N. Cal.).
> Please put me on the list.
>
> Richard Gross
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
> leave-729272-64758.8c09ef2da7c91a5a9dcd27d03a573bb7@lists.pub.getty.edu
>

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Subject: National Art Education Honor Society?
From: Sharon <sharon@art-rageous.net>
Date: Sat, 29 Jan 2011 10:41:40 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Do any of you have chapters of the National Art Honor Society at your
schools? What do you do in meetings? What are the advantages of
becoming a member?

I got an email about it this morning and just started checking it out.

-- 
Sharon
www.art-rageous.net
---
END OF DIGEST
---
m
leave-729354-333778.0532ae231bcd8a854a1dd29a69409d57@lists.pub.getty.edu
      
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Subject: Re: Artists and Folktales
From: Ann Heineman <aiheineman@prodigy.net>
Date: Sun, 30 Jan 2011 23:33:19 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9
Canadian artist Emily Carr used images based on stories of the Northwest coast tribes.
   Ann-on-y-mouse in Columbus
     Retired
Sent from my iPhone
> Brancusi's Golden Bird was inspired by a Romanian folktale about a dazzling bird called the Maiastra. He returned to the form of the bird again and again. To learn more about the folk tale that inspired Brancusi, check out a resource for families at the Art Institute of Chicago's site:
> 
> http://www.artic.edu/aic/education/CC/index.html
> 
> Click on "Story Time" and then "The Golden Bird" for an interactive version of the story 
> 
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> 
---
END OF DIGEST
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