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[teacherartexchange] Teaching the IB?

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From: shauna burke (shaunablythe_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Feb 20 2008 - 14:01:14 PST


Could anyone tell me how one goes about getting
certified to teach the IB in visual arts to high
school students?

thanks!
Shauna Burke
shaunablythe@yahoo.com

--- TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, February 18,
> 2008.
>
> 1. Re: teacherartexchange digest: February 17, 2008
> 2. Re:Robert Carl ?
> 3. Dreams Create Hope: Arts Learning Anchor Schools
> Conference, March 7-9, 2008
>
>
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>
> Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: February 17,
> 2008
> From: "Robert Carl" <carlr@acs.k12.sc.us>
> Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2008 06:47:06 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Any ideas for elementary students that can't follow
> directions? I mean that I have 4th and 5th graders
> that can't even do a 1st or 2nd grade art project,
> because they talk and do not listen to directions.
> This seems to be a cultural issue with this
> african-american community. They for the most part
> can't pass the state tests (NCLB mandates) each year
> due to this same cultural issues. We are way behind
> on what we are supposed to be covering. Discipline
> is bad and getting worse also. We have had all the
> workshops on differentiated learning styles,
> assessment strategies, closing the achievement gap,
> and empowering black males, etc., Nothing seems to
> work or be of any real value. All just fluff and
> ivory tower BS. Can anyone in a similar situation
> offer some REAL advice and suggestions?
>
> >>> "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> 02/18/08
> 3:01 AM >>>
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Sunday, February 17,
> 2008.
>
> 1. RE: H.S. Digital photo and computer art class
> 2. HS digital photo and computer art classes
> 3. Re: teacherartexchange digest: February 16, 2008
>
>
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>
> Subject: RE: H.S. Digital photo and computer art
> class
> From: "Kevan Nitzberg" <knitzber@ties2.net>
> Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2008 07:49:58 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> I also teach a similar class but with a bit of a
> different focus. The class
> is called Video Computer Art and combines computer
> graphic applications with
> iMovie / video instruction. The first part of the
> course is geared to
> students (all levels of ability and computer
> experience), becoming familiar
> with the computer as another art-making tool in
> addition to translating the
> traditional vocabulary of art into computer
> generated images. Initially we
> start with Appleworks Paint and Draw (PC version).
> We move on to working
> with online research and having the class begin to
> create PowerPoints (which
> I have them convert all of their projects into as a
> final grading format),
> as a tool to better communicate ideas and concepts
> that they are exploring.
> We also use Adobe Photoshop for 2 different projects
> in addition to
> utilizing the software as a additional way to
> manipulate stills created in
> their iMovie 'photomontage' films which are used as
> both stand alone pieces
> of artwork (and then saved and printed), as well as
> re-importing those
> further manipulated stills back into their video
> projects. As time allows,
> they create a second video that they base around a
> theme that they develop
> in groups. We only have 4 eMacs at our disposal
> with video editing
> capability at this point and so group work becomes
> the only way I can
> approach video at this time.
>
> Here are a list of the projects:
> 1) Compilation / Presentation of the Elements of Art
> and the Principles of
> Design (using Appleworks Paint and Draw), that
> explores these concepts
> through the creation of drawings, charts and the
> inclusion of exemplars from
> museum resources. Presented as a PowerPoint.
>
> 2) Fine Arts Primer (using the internet and
> PowerPoint), exploring as wide a
> range of the 'arts' as the student desires,
> utilizing the various features
> in PowerPoint including the animation and sound
> capabilities.
>
> 3) Adobe Photoshop Effect Manipulations, in which
> students need to use 3
> different photographs representing different subject
> categories, applying a
> set regimen of both single and multiple effects to
> each image (27 different
> effect screens are explored)
>
> 4) Manipulated Self Portraits, where students have
> had their photograph
> taken and placed in their building file and then
> need to manipulate their
> photograph in 5 different ways using various effects
> / tools in Photoshop.
> Each of those ways explores a different avenue /
> concept. The effect
> categories are: Historical / Cultural Image,
> Physical Property Change Image,
> Emotive / Expressive Image, Image with Objects
> Showing Special Interests,
> Image with Text
>
> 5) Career Exploration Collection, using
> ArtsConnectEd's Art Collector
> feature, students explore a wide range of careers in
> order to examine where
> the art / technology interface occurs in almost all
> areas in today's
> workplace. The collection (which is publishable), is
> split into 3 sections:
> a) a range of different careers with a variety of
> criteria that need to be
> explored b) their 'dream job' with the same criteria
> applied c) where they
> can go to obtain the necessary course work /
> training to be eligible for
> that job. Hyperlinks and images in addition to the
> text that they have
> developed are all part of these collections.
>
> 6) iMovie Photomontage video project using pre-shot
> dv tape and applying
> effects and transitions to the film in addition to
> creating a sound track
> and further manipulation of images in Photoshop that
> are re-imported into
> the film.
>
> 7) An additional video (also using iMovie), that
> explores a theme that they
> have created, storyboarded, shot and edited.
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: HS digital photo and computer art classes
> From: Scott Harrison <harrison360@suddenlink.net>
> Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2008 08:09:53 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Ellen,
> I teach 1 period of Digital Art at the high school
> level and we
> currently have a lab of 24 computers which are a mix
> of newer iMacs
> and Dells. I have a stable of 12 Canon A70 cameras
> that I loan out to
> kids without one. I asked the Rotary Club in town
> for help in
> purchasing these and found other donations also. Our
> class is funded
> (my salary for the period) by Mendocino Regional
> Occupations Project
> which also provided the site license for Photoshop.
> The students who
> put in the required hours and work receive a
> certificate. If you are
> teaching for vocational reasons then Photoshop is
> the way to go,
> otherwise Photoshop Elements is an affordable
> alternative. There is a
> freeware program called GIMP which is a good
> resource for the
> students who can't afford the other programs. One
> of the things I
> might incorporate into future classes would be video
> editing. I have
> a group of 8th grade students and we do a claymation
> project with our
> still cameras and iStopMotion software which is lots
> of fun.
> As for projects, I have them do a bunch of
> compositional and styled
> images including Rule of Thirds, Diagonal Lines,
> Different Point of
> View, Motion, Close Up, Framing, Hand Coloring,
> Shadows,
=== message truncated ===

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