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[teacherartexchange] Rubrics also long

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ejb35_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Tue Feb 12 2008 - 12:28:08 PST


When assessment started to be a serious discussion for art teachers,
a video example made my blood boil. The assignment was to make a
"whisper box" out of paper. Just an empty cube of paper. And to
decorate it "appropriately." Then the box examples were rated. Some
were colorful and school-art "pleasing" as Patty described, you
know, PLEASING.

One box was covered with little pencil scratches and runes, very
lightly, hard to make out. In other words, a perfect whisper box...
and IT GOT THE LOWEST RATING.

So, when you make an assignment, think: what should students know
and be able to do for an "appropriate" outcome?

One time an AP told me she wanted every single thing every single
student did in art to have a rubric of 20 items to rate attached,
every day. Let's see, 150 students a day, five days a week times
the daily work efforts in a 40 minute period times 20 items to
assess and each of those 20 items had 4 rating categories...

So make the rubric useful and sensible, and hand a duplicate to the
student to fill out for self-assessment.

Given the project description, students can write what they intended
to make/do and how they think it turned out; What might they do
differently next time? As for skill evaluation, What did they do
best? What do they need to work on?

Be simple, be specific. And as my granny would say: Good, better,
best, never let it rest, 'till your good is better and your better
best!

To all who assess, best wishes. Jane in Brooklyn

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