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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: February 17, 2007

---------

From: Claire d'Anthes (cdanthes_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon Feb 19 2007 - 18:41:58 PST


Hi, everybody,
I really appreciated reading all the suggestions of what to do with
early finishers as this has been one of my biggest challenges over the
years. I have tried all of the suggestions and they all work - to an
extent. I teach high school and the kids get pretty good at figuring
out how to play the system, so I think it's important to have a variety
of solutions up your sleeve. I agree with Michal and Woody that the
real key is getting them to understand that you expect their best
effort. I've always used rubrics but we are currently on work
slow-down so I'm going to do some end-of-project conferences. Two
things that have worked for me:

In Painting and Printmaking, we start an altered book project and spend
about a week on it. After that, at the end of each regular assignment,
there is an altered book assignment. Students who finish early and who
are satisfied with our discussion and their grade a la Michal, can get
this done in class. Students who finish on time will have some class
time to work and students who finish late have more homework. Most
kids enjoy working in their altered books, so it doesn't seem punitive.
   In other classes, I give out the technical warm-up sheets for the
next project- shading practice, pen and ink practice. Those who finish
late have homework. This has worked fairly well.

I'm a 5th year teacher, my last few years of teaching were enjoyable.
I'm having a new experience this year. Previously, 10th-12th grade
students at our school chose their teachers to the extent their
schedule permitted. This year 9th and 10th graders were pre-registered
and I seem to have a larger number of students who are content to coast
and socialize, something that is not encouraged in my class or grading
system. My expectations have always been clear and a rubric presented
from the beginning of the project, this year I've reviewed and revised
curriculum to appeal, put out loads of positive encouragement for the
insecure, but some students just don't seem to get it. A fair number
actually expect to get an A for minimal output, others are very content
to get a D (this is cool). As a result, this semester I decided to
longer give partial credit for incomplete work. In 5 years, I've
never had a parent complaint, but now I expect a few inquiries at
least. I'm curious as to how many of you that teach beginning high
school classes require homework and what you do about incomplete
projects.

Thanks for input and inspiration,
Claire

On Feb 18, 2007, at 11:00 PM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
digest wrote:

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, February 17, 2007.
>
> 1. Student Teacher
> 2. Kandinsky - help with specific music
> 3. Re: Student Teacher
> 4. Early finishers
> 5. Re: Student Teacher
> 6. Kandinsky and music
> 7. Student teacher materials
> 8. RE: Kandinsky and music
> 9. Technokids Graphic Tablet - $55
> 10. Re: Student Teacher
> 11. Re: Student Teacher
> 12. Re: Kandinsky - help with specific music
> 13. Re: Early finishers
> 14. Re: Early finishers
> 15. Early finishers
> 16. RE: Early finishers
> 17. Re: Early finishers
> 18. Re: Kandinsky - help with specific music
> 19. RE: Early finishers
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Student Teacher
> From: "KPRS2" <kprs2@earthlink.net>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 07:52:19 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
>
> Good Morning All!
> I will be having a student teacher in March. Not my first by all
> means. I
> am trying to put together a useful booklet for him, and other than the
> school specific information (i.e. bathroom locations, period times,
> grades,
> lunch room location, etc), what would you suggest I include? I teach
> high
> school.
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> San D
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Kandinsky - help with specific music
> From: chris massingill <chris_massingill@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 07:03:38 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Hello all,
>
> I am working on a lesson plan to introduce my students
> to Kandinsky and abstract painting (5th & 6th grade)
> the idea is to show them his work while listening to
> some Wagner and then allow them to make some sketches
> and paintings to more contemporary - later 20th C
> music - jazz, blues, etc.
>
> But I would REALLY like to be able to relate his
> composition paintings to specific music compositions -
> it seems like when I took art history that we learned
> that some of the composition paintings were direct
> representations of specific pieces of music - but I
> don't know what paintings to link to which pieces of
> music - can anyone help me or suggest a resource that
> would help me with this?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Chris Massingill
> Simon Intermediate, Conway, AR
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________________________________
> _____________
> 8:00? 8:25? 8:40? Find a flick in no time
> with the Yahoo! Search movie showtime shortcut.
> http://tools.search.yahoo.com/shortcuts/#news
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Student Teacher
> From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 09:31:32 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Hoiw about lesson plans or photos of your favorite lessons? A list of
> "must
> have" books (like the Art Teacher's Book of Lists - my favorite).
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>>
>> Good Morning All!
>> I will be having a student teacher in March. Not my first by all
>> means. I
>> am trying to put together a useful booklet for him, and other than the
>> school specific information (i.e. bathroom locations, period times,
>> grades,
>> lunch room location, etc), what would you suggest I include? I teach
>> high
>> school.
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Early finishers
> From: "Marybeth Bortzfield" <zbort@comcast.net>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 11:19:42 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Help! I need suggestions for upper elementary students, particularly
> grade
> 5,
> who finish a project early and then choose to sit and socialize or
> waste
> materials. I have noticed that my students have
> become very social rather then putting forth their best effort.
>
> I have plenty of independent opportunities, a closet full of materials
> and
> mediums that may be used
> during "free time", a sketchbook suggestion can filled with idea
> starters,
> individual sketchbooks, tear sheets in binders of
> magazine photographs of animals, people, sea life, etc. all organized
> and
> labeled. Art history books and tons of how to draw
> books; and cans of modeling clay (which tends to be let's waste time
> center).
>
> Does anyone have ideas or suggestions for me as to how to keep my
> students
> independently working rather than just hanging out and merely
> scribbling to
> look busy? I must add I am fortunate that they are not discipline
> problems,
> nor are they rude, I just feel they could use their time more
> effectively.
> My younger grades are always enthusiastic and creatively productive
> during
> their free-time, what can I do to keep my older elementary kids
> engaged?
>
> I'm thinking of requiring early finishers to choose one of the many art
> reproductions I have hanging around the room and to draw from it, then
> I
> could hang the reproduction and the student work in the hallway with a
> focus
> on both artists. Any comments?
>
> Thank you,
> Marybeth
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Student Teacher
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 11:44:18 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Hi,
> I do an info sheet for my student teachers.....have you thought about
> including the following:
> 1. information that would not be in a staff manual (for example - we
> have a
> photocopy room which has a coffee machine in it....but it is not for
> staff
> use...only for the office.....that's not in the staff manual because
> it's
> common knowledge - but I has a student teacher once take coffee from
> it and
> get in trouble with the office...)
> 2. your qualifications (as their associate/mentor/whatever your area
> calls
> you)
> 3. your contact information, including e-mails, home numbers, etc.
> 4. if your area is prone to snow delays/cancellations....what radio
> station
> / website they should be looking at for information...what do do...and
> I
> also include what time I leave the house, as I commute to work, incase
> they
> are unsure if they are to travel in bad weather.
> 5. important dates that would affect their teaching (ie: assemblies)
> 6. important dates that they should be aware of (ie: student council
> spirit
> days, etc.)
> 7. I also have homework for the student teacher to complete....yes,
> homework! In our area, they are suppose to come with a 'resume' type
> page
> for use, but I've found that a lot don't...so I have them complete an
> info
> sheet for me. I ask them to include their teaching subject, with
> specifics
> (for example, are they art histroy majors, studio arts, graphic arts,
> etc.)
> I ask them to include what they taught at the previous student teaching
> blocks (they do three blocks of teaching time in this area)...this is
> so I
> don't give them the same thing......I ask them what they think are
> their
> strengths in the arts, and what they know are their weaknesses (or
> what they
> are unfamiliar with) so that I can expose them to a little more stuff
> (ie:
> have they had any experience with clay? printmaking? etc.).
> 8. If there are specific routines for your classroom (that are unique
> compared to the regular school routines) that should be explained ie:
> where/how do students hand things in? Makes it easier for the student
> teacher, and the students as routines remain relatively normal.
>
> That's all I can think of for now......
> good luck!
> sue
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Kandinsky and music
> From: "Pam Stephens" <pgstephens@npgcable.com>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 09:58:48 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> Chris:
>
> Kandinsky is generally considered to have had the neural condition
> called
> synaesthesia wherein two senses cross over or combine. Not only was he
> deeply influenced by music, but Kandinsky is believed to have seen it.
> Much
> of his work is believed to be visual representations of music; what he
> actually saw in his mind's eye when he heard musical sound. Wagner's
> "Lohengrin" was an early influence upon Kandinsky's art.
>
> Sometime later Kandinsky was closely aligned with the thinking of
> Viennese
> composer, Arnold Schoenberg, whose music rejected thematic repetition.
> Listen to some of Schoenberg's music and you'll see an immediate
> correlation. Kandinsky's thinking was also aligned with Russian
> composer
> Scriabin who looked for similarities between tone and color. Scriabin's
> symphony "Prometheus: A Poem of Fire" is an example of this.
>
> It's interesting that Kandinsky, who was also a trained musician, felt
> that
> music was a superior language to painting. His goal was what the German
> language refers to as "gesamtkuntswerk" (total work of art).
>
> There are some interesting studies that have been and that are being
> conducted in synaesthesia. One classic study asks people to look at a
> star-like shape and a more rounded shape. When asked to identify the
> "kiki"
> or "bouba" shape, most people call the pointed shape Kiki because the
> word
> sounds pointed. In similar fashion, bouba sounds rounded. Here's a
> non-academic site that shows the test.
> http://jrandolp.wordpress.com/2007/01/26/the-kikibouba-experiment-and-
> the-hystricine-finnish-language/
>
> Although this probably seems off base from the original question about
> music
> and Kandinsky, consider that Kandinsky--because of synaesthesia--more
> than
> likely saw in his mind's eye colors and shapes that were associated
> with
> musical sound and that he transcribed in paint what he saw.
>
> Sorry to get so off track, but I have recently been reading and writing
> about this topic and find it fascinating. I'd be curious to see what
> sort of
> artwork your students create.
>
> From Sedona,
> Pam
>
> ***************************************
> Pamela Geiger Stephens, PhD
> Northern Arizona University
> School of Art
> Department of Art Education
> PO Box 6020
> Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
>
> Pamela.Stephens@NAU.edu
>
> http://pamstephens.blogspot.com/
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Student teacher materials
> From: "Pam Stephens" <pgstephens@npgcable.com>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 10:09:57 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> School Arts publishes a monthly column, "Student Teacher Survival
> Guide"
> that might be of help. Issues of the magazine during the 2005-06
> school year
> include the column. The column this year has been online and is not
> archived.
>
> I keep some information posted on my website for student teachers. You
> are
> welcome to download and use anything that will assist you.
> http://www.artresourcesforteachers.com/ then click on NAU Students.
> Scroll
> down to the heading "Hints for a Better Student Teaching Experience."
>
> From Sedona,
> Pam
>
>
>
> ***************************************
> Pamela Geiger Stephens, PhD
> Northern Arizona University
> School of Art
> Department of Art Education
> PO Box 6020
> Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
>
> (p) 928-523-2432
> (f) 928-523-3333
>
> Pamela.Stephens@NAU.edu
>
> http://pamstephens.blogspot.com/
>
> http://www.artresourcesforteachers.com
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Kandinsky and music
> From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 13:26:44 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> I have posted some things about synesthesia over the years -=20
> Most recently the Medical Mysteries episode in August:
>
> http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/story?id=3D2311762&page=3D1
>
>
> I am interested in it not just for art - but my writing classes -=20
>
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4558075.stm
>
> Words 'can change what we smell' =20
> =20
> The research could have implications for restaurateurs=20
> A rose by any other name might not smell as sweet, UK research
> suggests.
>
> But labelling an unpleasant smell with a more appealing name can
> improve
> its aroma, an Oxford University team has found.=20
>
> In an experiment, volunteers asked to smell a cheddar cheese odour
> rated
> it as more pleasant when it was labelled as "cheddar" than as "body
> odour".=20
>
> A label was enough to make them imagine a smell even when they were
> sniffing clean air, the journal Neuron reports.=20
>
> A review for a book by Vladimir Nabokov - Alphabet in Color -=20
>
> Book Description
> Vladimir Nabokov saw rich colors in letters and sounds and noted the
> deficiency of color in literature, praising Gogol as the first Russian
> writer to truly appreciate yellow and violet. He saw q as browner than
> k, and s as not the light blue of c, but a curious mixture of azure and
> mother-of-pearl. For anyone who has ever wondered how the colors
> Nabokov
> heard might manifest themselves visually, Alphabet in Color is a
> remarkable journey of discovery. Jean Holabird's interpretation of the
> colored alphabets of one of the twentieth century's literary greats is
> a
> revelation. The book masterfully brings to life the charming and
> vibrant
> synesthetic colored letters that until now existed only in Nabokov's
> mind. In Alphabet in Color Jean Holabird's grasp of form and space
> blends perfectly with Nabokov's idea that a subtle interaction exists
> between sound and shape. In his playful foreword, Brian Boyd, "the
> prince of Nabokovians", points out that an important part of "Nabokov's
> passion for precision was his passion for color."
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Technokids Graphic Tablet - $55
> From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 14:00:36 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> New at the American International Toy Fair - and in WIRED magazine:
>
> http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,72674-0.html?tw=3Drss.index
> =20
>
> NEW YORK -- If you suspect that kids today are growing up too fast,
> next
> week's American International Toy Fair at the Jacob K. Javits
> Convention
> Center may be all the proof you need.
>
> In keeping with the general trend toward "age compression" or KGOY
> (industry shorthand for "kids getting older younger"), toy
> manufacturers
> will be introducing a host of adult technologies aimed at small
> children
> -- including kid-friendly laptops, graphics tablets, digital cameras
> and
> a host of other high-tech items.
>
> Consumer electronics for kids is the fastest growing trend in the $22
> billion toy industry. With children becoming ever more tech savvy at
> ever-younger ages, toymakers are scrambling to capitalize on the
> rapidly
> growing market for youth electronics.
>
> "We've been seeing kids are getting comfortable at a scary age," says
> Richard Vincent, CEO and creative director of Kutoka Interactive, which
> will be introducing a line of colorful optical mice designed just for
> tots.
>
> Vincent initially thought toddlers wouldn't have the motor skills to
> manipulate adult peripherals, but that hasn't been a problem.
>
> "We've seen 2-year-olds doing very well, and it's unnerving," he says.
>
> Along with its optical mice, Kutoka will also have a line of digital
> cameras and graphics tablets produced by French toy giant Smoby and
> aimed specifically at children. Each device will come bundled with its
> own software, custom-tailored to young users.
>
> The $55 Technokids Graphic Tablet, for example, features Click & Create
> With Mia -- a kind of Photoshop for tots that teaches kids to draw,
> paint and animate shapes on screen, and allows them to create posters,
> invitations and birthday cards.
>
> "You have a lot of the concepts behind Photoshop, but it's also a
> project program," says Vincent.
>
> Similarly, the software that comes with Smoby's digital cameras allows
> children to morph, label and organize their images, then e-mail them to
> their friends.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Student Teacher
> From: Ann Heineman <aiheineman@prodigy.net>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 14:24:31 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> To this great list I would add:
> Samples of rewards given to students, for good behavior, entries in
> art exhibits, etc. This may include templates for certificates,
> sample ribbons, etc.
> Introduction to staff at meetings, also introduction to staff
> support members--custodians, nurses, etc. If possible, get pictures
> of all staff members, students and make available to student teacher
> Introduction to/awareness of parent organization officers, like PTO,
> PTA
> Ask student teacher to make a sample substitute plan in case she/he
> is absent
> Location of and operation of audio/visual equipment, copiers,
> laminators
> A floor plan of the school
>
> Ann-on-y-mouse in Columbus
> Art teacher, K-5, retired
>
> On Feb 18, 2007, at 11:44 AM, Sue Stevens wrote:
>
>> Hi,
>> I do an info sheet for my student teachers.....have you thought
>> about including the following:
>> 1. information that would not be in a staff manual (for example -
>> we have a photocopy room which has a coffee machine in it....but it
>> is not for staff use...only for the office.....that's not in the
>> staff manual because it's common knowledge - but I has a student
>> teacher once take coffee from it and get in trouble with the
>> office...)
>> 2. your qualifications (as their associate/mentor/whatever your
>> area calls you)
>> 3. your contact information, including e-mails, home numbers, etc.
>> 4. if your area is prone to snow delays/cancellations....what
>> radio station / website they should be looking at for
>> information...what do do...and I also include what time I leave the
>> house, as I commute to work, incase they are unsure if they are to
>> travel in bad weather.
>> 5. important dates that would affect their teaching (ie: assemblies)
>> 6. important dates that they should be aware of (ie: student
>> council spirit days, etc.)
>> 7. I also have homework for the student teacher to
>> complete....yes, homework! In our area, they are suppose to come
>> with a 'resume' type page for use, but I've found that a lot
>> don't...so I have them complete an info sheet for me. I ask them
>> to include their teaching subject, with specifics (for example, are
>> they art histroy majors, studio arts, graphic arts, etc.) I ask
>> them to include what they taught at the previous student teaching
>> blocks (they do three blocks of teaching time in this area)...this
>> is so I don't give them the same thing......I ask them what they
>> think are their strengths in the arts, and what they know are their
>> weaknesses (or what they are unfamiliar with) so that I can expose
>> them to a little more stuff (ie: have they had any experience with
>> clay? printmaking? etc.).
>> 8. If there are specific routines for your classroom (that are
>> unique compared to the regular school routines) that should be
>> explained ie: where/how do students hand things in? Makes it
>> easier for the student teacher, and the students as routines remain
>> relatively normal.
>>
>> That's all I can think of for now......
>> good luck!
>> sue
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to http://www.getty.edu/education/
>> teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Student Teacher
> From: Ann Heineman <aiheineman@prodigy.net>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 14:31:44 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
> Just thought of something else:
> Samples of school requisition forms for supplies
> List of must have supplies ordered for a year, names of suppliers
> and all contact info for representatives
> Sample budget for the year
> Introduction to "oddball" per/item names for art materials, like
> "quire"--anybody want to have fun figuring out to what that
> applies? :-)
>
>
> On Feb 18, 2007, at 11:44 AM, Sue Stevens wrote:
>
>> Hi,
>> I do an info sheet for my student teachers.....have you thought
>> about including the following:
>> 1. information that would not be in a staff manual (for example -
>> we have a photocopy room which has a coffee machine in it....but it
>> is not for staff use...only for the office.....that's not in the
>> staff manual because it's common knowledge - but I has a student
>> teacher once take coffee from it and get in trouble with the
>> office...)
>> 2. your qualifications (as their associate/mentor/whatever your
>> area calls you)
>> 3. your contact information, including e-mails, home numbers, etc.
>> 4. if your area is prone to snow delays/cancellations....what
>> radio station / website they should be looking at for
>> information...what do do...and I also include what time I leave the
>> house, as I commute to work, incase they are unsure if they are to
>> travel in bad weather.
>> 5. important dates that would affect their teaching (ie: assemblies)
>> 6. important dates that they should be aware of (ie: student
>> council spirit days, etc.)
>> 7. I also have homework for the student teacher to
>> complete....yes, homework! In our area, they are suppose to come
>> with a 'resume' type page for use, but I've found that a lot
>> don't...so I have them complete an info sheet for me. I ask them
>> to include their teaching subject, with specifics (for example, are
>> they art histroy majors, studio arts, graphic arts, etc.) I ask
>> them to include what they taught at the previous student teaching
>> blocks (they do three blocks of teaching time in this area)...this
>> is so I don't give them the same thing......I ask them what they
>> think are their strengths in the arts, and what they know are their
>> weaknesses (or what they are unfamiliar with) so that I can expose
>> them to a little more stuff (ie: have they had any experience with
>> clay? printmaking? etc.).
>> 8. If there are specific routines for your classroom (that are
>> unique compared to the regular school routines) that should be
>> explained ie: where/how do students hand things in? Makes it
>> easier for the student teacher, and the students as routines remain
>> relatively normal.
>>
>> That's all I can think of for now......
>> good luck!
>> sue
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to http://www.getty.edu/education/
>> teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Kandinsky - help with specific music
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 16:46:02 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
> Hi Chris,
>
> This excerpt lists some specific music:
> http://www.artchive.com/artchive/K/kandinsky.html
> Excerpted from "Kandinsky: Compositions", by Magdalena Dabrowski
> Artchive has pop up ads....
>
> Here are some specific works:
> http://www.ce-review.org/00/16/bagust16.html
> "After a concert of Schoenberg's music in January 1911, Kandinsky
> established contact with the composer, and the two wrote and
> collaborated intensively for the next few years.
>
> "The painting Kandinsky did after this 1911 concert is one of many of
> Kandinsky's works on display in the rooms of the Schoenberg Centre.
> Entitled Impression 111 (Koncert) it exploits bright colours and bold
> shapes, which are expressive in their own right without references to
> the outside world distracting from their immediate effect."
> -----------------------------------------------------------
>
> http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=3D/arts/2006/06/10/
> bakandins=
> ky10.xml&sSheet=3D/arts/2006/06/10/ixtop.html
> "Kandinsky is believed to have had synaesthesia, a harmless condition
> that allows a person to appreciate sounds, colours or words with two
> or more senses simultaneously. In his case, colours and painted marks
> triggered particular sounds or musical notes and vice versa. The
> involuntary ability to hear colour, see music or even taste words
> results from an accidental cross-wiring in the brain that is found in
> one in 2,000 people, and in many more women than men.
>
> "Synaesthesia is a blend of the Greek words for together (syn) and
> sensation (aesthesis). The earliest recorded case comes from the
> Oxford academic and philosopher John Locke in 1690, who was bemused by
> "a studious blind man" claiming to experience the colour scarlet when
> he heard the sound of a trumpet."
>
> Review of Synesthesia:
> http://www.ycp.edu/besc/Journal2003/eastonj.htm
> ---------------------------------------------
>
> Here is a CD with music Kandinsky may have listened to:
> http://sfmoma.stores.yahoo.net/kaandmu.html
> Kandinsky was only interested in music composed in his time, the
> avant-garde. This program highlights the transition from the Romantic
> period to the modern composition. Included are works by Schoenberg,
> Busoni, and Berg. CD: $19.95
>
> More on Kandinsky and Schoenberg:
> http://www.thejewishmuseum.org/site/pages/press.php?id=3D12
>
> I also found this composer mentioned:
> Alexander N. Scriabin (1872 - 1915), the Russian composer
>
> I found this spelling also - Arnold Sch=F6nberg
>
> Mark Hardin review of some of Kandinsky's compositions:
> http://www.glyphs.com/art/kandinsky/
> I would look up this book:
> Kandinsky: Compositions
> by Magdalena Dabrowski
> Published by the Museum of Modern Art
>
> Judy Decker
>
> On 2/18/07, chris massingill wrote:
>> Hello all,
>> I am working on a lesson plan to introduce my students
>> to Kandinsky and abstract painting (5th & 6th grade)
>> the idea is to show them his work while listening to
>> some Wagner and then allow them to make some sketches
>> and paintings to more contemporary - later 20th C
>> music - jazz, blues, etc.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Early finishers
> From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 16:46:15 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
> Don't let them be finished until you ok their work. If they slop
> through
> something tell them specifically what needs more attention. Then, if
> you
> both agree that the work is finished have them try the project again
> using a
> different approach. Once they realize you won't accept anything other
> than
> their best work, AND that there is no reward ("free time") for
> finishing
> early then they will adjust and begin to spend more time on their work.
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
>> Help! I need suggestions for upper elementary students, particularly
>> grade 5,
>> who finish a project early and then choose to sit and socialize or
>> waste
>> materials. I have noticed that my students have
>> become very social rather then putting forth their best effort.
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Early finishers
> From: trish ackerman <dacke8175@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 14:51:04 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 14
>
> I usually have a specific project for the students to
> do when we are getting to the end. I tell them what we
> will be working on and sometimes list on the board
> what they can do when finished. Some successful ones
> Ihave done:
> colored pencil step by step drawing on a sheet. Draw 1
> has a series of books that are great. A project where
> they draw one shoe. Fold the paper over and use the
> light box or window to copy and then design the funky
> pants-finish with markers. In the fall , I have them
> do a leaf tracing project that they overlap and color
> with warm or cool colors with a grid. I have specific
> projects for each grade for different weeks of the
> year. I think it helps to have something different for
> them to do each time you finish your regular art
> project. Oh, in the fall I have them draw haunted
> houses with great perspective and color them in.
>
>
> Trish Ackerman
> Core Knowledge Charter School
> Middle School Art,Parker, Colorado
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________________________________
> _____________
> Sucker-punch spam with award-winning protection.
> Try the free Yahoo! Mail Beta.
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>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Early finishers
> From: "KPRS2" <kprs2@earthlink.net>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 18:17:31 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 15
>
> For my beginning students (9th graders mostly), I have a rubric that
> they
> put on the back of their work. The rubric is quite extensive, although
> easy
> to make.(I use an online rubric maker) When they come up to say they
> are
> finished, we turn the work over, and go over the rubric. "Dollars to
> Donuts"
> (as my father used to say), they have done the minimum on the rubric,
> and at
> that point I always say, according to the rubric, you are going to be
> getting a D on this project, now let's talk about what you need to get
> that
> A. I am in the second week of the new semester, and haven't started the
> rubric system on paper yet, just verbally. As a first step, I have them
> verbally tell me what I required in the project, then they tell me and
> then
> I say "that is a rubric and in the next project you will actually have
> a
> rubric, that you can work with". So far, knock wood, those students
> who have
> verbalized what the requirements were, and were finished early, when
> they
> came up to see me, and we talked, realized they were missing
> something. Next
> week we start our major work, since they just finished exercises in
> line,
> shape and form(value). We are starting a small still life (jacks and a
> ball), and I will make a rubric for them to attach to their finished
> drawing. You can bet that line, shape and form will be a big part of
> this
> rubric.
>
> San D
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Early finishers
> From: "familyerickson" <familyerickson@cox.net>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 17:52:41 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 16
>
> Marybeth,
> I have a very detailed laminated 8 x 10" pen and ink patterned
> drawing that
> I use as a sample handout for 5th graders when they finish.
> They use fine line sharpie markers to design their own detailed pen
> and ink
> and it usually takes them 9 weeks (of extra-time) to finish. I tell
> them
> this is for a grade but it is only done during their free time. They
> keep
> them in a special folder to work on. They enjoy it and it is so
> labor-intensive that it keeps them from visiting with each other.
> For the
> few students who work so carefully or slowly on the assignemnts that
> they
> never have the free-time to do the pen and ink--I usually negotiate at
> the
> end of the 9 weeks a smaller version (say 3 x 3 inch) that they can
> turn in
> for the grade.
> Cindy
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Marybeth Bortzfield [mailto:zbort@comcast.net]
> Sent: Sunday, February 18, 2007 10:20 AM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Early finishers
>
>
> Help! I need suggestions for upper elementary students, particularly
> grade
> 5,
> who finish a project early and then choose to sit and socialize or
> waste
> materials.
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.5.441 / Virus Database: 268.18.2/692 - Release Date:
> 2/18/2007
> 4:35 PM
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Early finishers
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 17:52:13 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 17
>
>
> On Feb 18, 2007, at 3:46 PM, M. Austin wrote:
>
>> Once they realize you won't accept anything other than their best
>> work......
>
> Michal has the real answer here.
> Woody
>
> Woody Duncan woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> Invitation to my exhibitions
> http://www.taospaint.com/Painted/Horse.html
>
> January 19, 2009 Be Patience America
>
> Join the Campaign Now
> John Edwards for President
> http://johnedwards.com/splash/
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Kandinsky - help with specific music
> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Sun, 18 Feb 2007 18:31:46 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 18
>
>
> Definitely Bartok, but also Eric Satie. Prokofiev.
> Saumel Barber. Dmitry Kabalevsky. It will be fun.
> great idea.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Betty C Bowen
> printmaker, painter
> art educator
> Cushing Oklahoma
> bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Early finishers
> From: "" <lava5000@excite.com>
> Date: Mon, 19 Feb 2007 00:26:01 -0500 (EST)
> X-Message-Number: 19
>
>
>
>
> Why not use centers?
>
>
>
> Lauren
>
>
>
>
>
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>
> END OF DIGEST
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