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RE: Curriculum: Art II

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From: Rebecca Stone-Danahy (RebeccaStoneDanahy_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Feb 12 2002 - 08:19:19 PST


Advanced Placement: 2-D Portfolio
One Year: Class meetings every day

Overview:
The Advanced Placement 2-D portfolio art course, a studio based art class,
is an elective offered to students in grades eleven and twelve. The class
enables highly motivated students to perform at the college level while
still in high school. Two-dimensional design involves purposeful
decision-making about how to use the elements and principles of art in an
integrative way. This portfolio is intended to address a very broad
interpretation of design issues. The students are asked to demonstrate
proficiency in 2-D design in a variety of forms. These could include, but
are not limited to, graphic design, typography, digital imaging,
photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, illustration, painting,
printmaking, etc. Videotapes, three-dimensional works, and color
photocopies of artwork are not allowed. The class is thus constructed to
develop facility with a variety of media and techniques traditional to the
visual arts with emphasis on achieving a high level of skill. The sections
of the 2-D portfolio require that students demonstrate quality, breadth, and
in-depth engagement in the process of making art. It is expected that
students will continue to increase drawing and design capabilities while
mastering the elements and principles of design. It is expected that
students will be able to self and group critique their art work (art
criticism), work towards developing an individual style as an artist, have a
firm grasp of social and political issues and apply these concepts into
works of art, and have a concrete knowledge base of what artists have done
in the past, what contemporary artists are creating in the present, and what
innovations in art await us in the future. Thus, students will continue to
be exposed to past and contemporary artists in and out of the classroom and
visit local art galleries and museums.

Materials:
Required Text: The Annotated Mona Lisa: a crash course in art history from
prehistoric to post-modern. Strickland, Carol and Boswell, John. Andrews
and McMeel, A University Press Syndicate Company. 1992
Art Supplies: The art materials required for the Advanced Placement 2-D
Design portfolio include a wide variety of media to include but is not
limited to: drawing paper, drawing pencils, erasers, charcoal, kneadable
erasers, conte crayons, pastels, oil pastels, construction paper, fadeless
paper, mat board, India ink, calligraphy brushes, tempera paint, acrylic
paint, linoleum, printmaking ink and assorted supplies, colored pencils,
paint brushes, oil pastels, mat board, watercolors, watercolor brushes,
fabric, canvas, canvas stretchers, silk screen frames and printing
materials, water-soluble crayons.
Art History Resources: History of Art: Slipcased (History of Art, 6th Ed) --
by H. W. Janson, Anthony F. Janson; Hardcover, slides to accompany book

Objectives:
The Student Will:
A. Demonstrate advanced drawing techniques and skills and communicate
ideas in an organized manner.
B. Produce works of art that demonstrate mastery with the elements of
art (line, shape, form, space, color, and texture), and principles of design
(rhythm and movement, balance, proportion, variety, emphasis, and unity).
C. Discuss and make choices about materials as they relate to function
effectively.
D. Communicate his/her perceptions of the world using the art elements,
design principles, and art vocabulary.
E. Demonstrate in his/her artwork expression with a personal style.
F. Compare and contrast styles of art from major time periods and
cultures using vocabulary specific to the visual arts.
G. Make sound critical judgements about the quality of artworks based
on observation and experience.
H. Recognize, describe, analyze, discuss, and write about the visual
characteristics of works of art.
I. Begin to prepare a visual art portfolio for the purposes of
collegiate interviews.
J. Complete the AP Portfolio performance-based exam by submitting the
required art works for the quality, concentration, and breadth sections.

Content:
A. Introduction Activities
1. Self-Inventory
2. Group Problem Solving Activities
3. Look through Art magazines and websites
4. Collect Imagery and discuss art "styles"
5. Review summer assignments
6. Prepare studio spaces and gather materials
B. Portfolio Requirements
1. Review Poster for Quality, Breadth, and Concentration requirements
2. Look at past examples of portfolios
3. Discuss concentration ideas and deadlines
a. Begin storyboard for concentration ideas
b. Develop first three sketches more fully
c. Finalize first concentration sketch
d. Students continue concentration work on own
C. Line
1. Contour Line and Review of Composition
        A. Plants
        B. Figure
2. Elements and Principles: Line, Space, Emphasis, Balance, and
Movement, Proportion
3. Art History: "How to Look at a Painting", The Birth of Art
"Pre-Historic through the Middle Ages"
4. Art Criticism: Judging Contemporary Art
D. Gestural Drawings
1. Plants (twenty minute, ten minute, five minute, three minute, two
minute, one minute, and thirty second drawings)
2. Figure (twenty minute, ten minute, five minute, three minute, two
minute, one minute, and thirty second drawings)
A. Elements and Principles: Line, Space, Emphasis, Balance, Movement,
Proportion
B. Art History: The Middle Ages through the Renaissance
C. Art Criticism: Judging a work of art
E. Perspective and Foreshortening in the Figure
1. Figure and Skeletal Studies
2. Elements and Principles: Line, Space, Shape, Emphasis, Balance, and
Movement, Proportion
3. Art History: Baroque
4. Art Criticism: Judging a work of art
F. Negative Space Drawings
1. Chair, Plants, Bicycle, Figure, and Skeletal Studies
2. Elements and Principles: Line, Space, Shape, Emphasis, Balance,
Movement, Proportion,
        3. Art History: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
        4. Art Criticism: Judging a work of art
G. The Figure
1. The Head, Features, and Hair
A. Forehead, planes of the Face, axes of the face, the eye, the nose,
the mouth and lips, the ear, and hair.
2. The Neck
        A. Skeletal and Figure Studies
3. The Torso
A. The rib cage, shoulder girdle, planes of the back, the pelvis and
abdomen, and the back.
B. Skeletal and Figure studies
4. The Upper Extremity: Arm, Wrist, and Hand
A. The upper arm, the forearm, the wrist, the hand
B. Skeletal and Figure Studies
5. The Lower Extremity: Thigh, Leg, and Foot
A. The thigh, calf, and foot
B. Skeletal and Figure Studies
6. Elements and Principles: Line; Shape, Form, and Space; Rhythm and
Movement; Balance; Proportion; Variety, Emphasis and Unity
7. Art History: Realism through Art Nouveau
8. Art Criticism: Judging a work of Art
H. Drape Formation of Costumed Figure
1. Review of lyrical line studies
a. Elements and Principles: Line; Shape, Form, and Space; Rhythm and
Movement; Balance; Proportion; Variety, Emphasis and Unity
b. Art History: The Birth of Photography through Impressionism
c. Art Criticism: Judging a work of Art
I. Landscape
1. Review elements of landscape design
2. Landscape painting from life
A. Elements and Principles: Line, Space, Balance, Proportion
B. Art History: Rodin through Post-Impressionism
C. Art Criticism: Judging a contemporary work of art
I. Gestural Drawings (Review)
1. Plants (twenty minute, ten minute, five minute, three minute, two
minute, one minute, and thirty second drawings)
2. Figure (twenty minute, ten minute, five minute, three minute, two
minute, one minute, and thirty second drawings)
a. Elements and Principles: Line; Shape, Form, and Space; Rhythm and
Movement; Balance; Proportion; Variety, Emphasis and Unity
b. Art History: Early Expressionism through The Birth of Modern
Architecture
                c. Art Criticism: Judging a work of art
E. Still Life
1. Elements and Principles: Line; Shape, Form, and Space; Rhythm and
Movement; Balance; Proportion; Variety, Emphasis and Unity; Color; Texture
        2. Art History: Review Post Impressionism/Pointillism; Fauvism
through Modernism outside of France
        3. Art Criticism: Judging a Functional Object
J. Abstract Expressionism
1. Painting and Mixed Media
2. Elements and Principles: Space, Rhythm, Balance, Emphasis, Unity,
Color, Texture
3. Art History: Mondrian through Photography comes of Age
4. Art Criticism: Judging a work of art
K. Nature Drawings
1. Define previous drawings with color
                A. Create stamps with emphasis on rhythm and repetition
and color
        B. Fabric design studies
2. Elements and Principles: Line; Shape, Form, and Space; Rhythm and
Movement; Balance; Proportion; Variety, Emphasis and Unity; Color; Texture
3. Art History: American Art through Figural Expressionism
4. Art Criticism: Judging a work of art
L. Mixed Media Fabric Collage
1. Fabric Collage
2. Silk-Screening
3. Photo Emulsion
4. Text transfer
        5. Water soluble crayon: mark-making
        6. Elements and Principles: Form, Line, Space, Rhythm,
Balance, Proportion, Variety, Emphasis, Unity, Color, and Texture
        7. Art History: Contemporary Art and the Future
        8. Art Criticism: Judging a work of art

Methodology:
The beginning art students will be instructed through the applications of
demonstration, written handouts, and hands-on activities. Students will be
exposed to art time periods and cultures of art through lecture, slide
presentation, written handouts, and hands-on learning. Students will be
guided through the processes of comparing and contrasting visual works of
art through oral and written activities.

Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated according to class participation, readiness for
class, work ethic, effort, demonstration of concepts taught, sketchbook
and/or journal entries, and written and oral activities relating to project
work.

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