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Re: teaching/meeting art standards

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From: Kathleen Shilson (kshilson_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Feb 07 2002 - 19:53:11 PST


Give me an example of a grad standard that doesn't have wording that a
lawyer would have a problem interpreting? I am still trying to figure out
what to do... after talking to a "grad standard" technician/specialist..
checklist after check list for this and that.. who has time to teach the
elements and priciples of art when you are buried in paper work..
----- Original Message -----
From: <Nnaell@aol.com>
To: "ArtsEdNet Talk" <artsednet@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2002 11:49 AM
Subject: teaching/meeting art standards

> with regard to teaching standards.....art lessons do not need to be
complicated in lots of bells and whistles to meet these requirements. For
instance, with a simple drawing lesson you can hit 3-5 standards. If you
introduce an artist, his/her work, discuss how it is relevant to the
student, and have the subject matter be relevant. Also, be creative with
your materials. Clay is cheap...if you have a kiln. If you do not have a
kiln...found object sculpture is free!
>
> I have to say, I have a very generous budget...but I am also amazed at how
far some of you are able to stretch your budgets by being creative. One
person was telling me that a great source for acetate is a hospital. When
they do x-rays, they was off the acetate after and throw it away!
Corregated cardboard, which can be used for a variety of things...including
wonderful masks....is free. Just have your custodian collect it for you.
Or just collect it yourself. Collect flowers when they are in bloom and
press them...free and really beautiful when used in handmade paper. (which
can be made from scrap paper or news print) You all know this...I am
preaching to the converted.
>
> The standards are not so much about materials as they are about getting
teachers to design well rounded lessons that are not just about art
production.
>
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