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Japanese hanko/suggestions & info

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BibelotsOutpost_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Thu Feb 07 2002 - 08:26:55 PST


Thanks to all that responded to my question on using lino
cutters with 3rd-5th grades to carve Japanese hanko (personal
seal/signature) ~ the general consensus was that lino cutters
were inappropriate for large groups of 3rd graders in particular...
and cautionary for 4th & 5th.
Some alternative suggestions included scratchfoam or styrofoam
prints (drawn into with pencils, pens, nails, blunt needles, etc.),
scratch foam blocks, hard foam that can be impressed with
textures when heated and then reused, cut-&-glue "foamie"
material on cardboard, stamps of fired clay, plasticine clay
(non-permanent stamp)... suggestions for printing included
printing ink and marker prints...
  I started this project this week, using scratch foam and wooden
styluses found in the storeroom. I purchased small wooden spools
to mount them on (with a layer of foamie between for a cushion).
Found that the top of one of our glue sticks was just the right
size to press into the scratchfoam and foamies as a circle template.
I had the kids do several designs in their sketch books before
beginning (did a little talk about positive/negative space,
repetition, balance, and reversing letters... suggested initials
as a starting point for their design, stressing that it was to be
a personal design, and therefore smiley faces and certain
other symbols would not be acceptable) ~ still, designing was
difficult because the area they could use was so small.
   The kids have a choice of a smaller design to fit on the spool
(which can then be stored inside of a film canister) or a larger
design that could be glued on the bottom of a film canister.
The plan to finish these off includes doing orizomegami (fold
& dye) paper and decoupaging one of their papers around the
film canister... drilling a hole in the top to make a necklace or
hanging loop, adorning with threads/yarns and beads.
  Using red stamp ink pad and/or markers to stamp the designs...
we'll be using them to sign their calligraphy project and name tags
for art on display for this unit.
Thanks again, everyone!
Deborah

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