Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

Re: essential questions for art teachers - my study long post

---------

Bicyclken_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Sat Feb 24 2001 - 09:30:57 PST


1. How many years have you taught?
    30 years

 2. Which levels?
    High School Art 1,2,3,4,,A.P., Ind. Study, Commercial Art.

3. When did your own formal art studies begin?
   At San Jose State University in 1966,

4. What degrees do you hold (art or other)?
    BA in Art , Life time credential in Secondary education, 45 units past BA

5.What is your medium?
    I like acrylic, pastels, craypas, collagraphs, multimedia relief,
watercolor and ink.

6. What subject matter do you explore?
    I like to do Flowers, People, Cycling action, landscapes, nonobjective
compositions.
   
7. What are your major influences (artists, schools of art)?
    Monet, Degas, Picasso/Braque, Rene Magritte, Japanese art, Millet and
Carot, Robert Rauschenburg, Wayne Thiebaud, Richard Diebencorn, Georgia
O'Keefe, Many others.

8. Have you studied contemporary art (1960s to present)?
    Yes
9. Are you informed enough to teach students about contemporary art?    
    Yes

10. When you were in school, were there any "rules" or guidelines in
the art room limiting what subjects students could address?
       Yes, in High school we were controlled in subject matter and technique.

11. Do you (or your school) have any limits on your students' artistic
expression?
        I have an objective to each lesson, quite often the students will
come up with an alternative in subject or use of the techniques that I think
is great and we experiment. They have helped me often in getting new ideas
or different approaches to the assignment. They are told what the assignment
is trying to teach and if they can do both gain experience and experiment I
say good! I do not allow free reign on subject matter and it must be in good
taste.

12. Has your own art practice been questioned as to its
"appropriateness" of subject matter?
  No, not that I know of I don't paint or draw things that are in bad taste,
however I have been critized for using so many cycling subjects, however I
have designed T-shirts and art for my bike club for 25 years.
       
13. Have you or any other art teachers you know experienced
censorship? No, our administration loves what we do because we are a large
dept. (7 teachers) and show very well to the community.

14. Have you limited the subject matter you teach in light of
"community standards" (of your school or the wider community in which
you live)?
  We talk in class of proper taste and what is appropriate for the aHigh
school student to use. They are not pushy about testing the limits and know
that I would not allow it or give them a grade. If I was unsure of a piece,
I have had the parents sign a letter stating that they know of the subject
and that they approve and that I have the right to refuse to show it in a
school show.

15. Have you limited the subject matter you teach in light of
"community standards" (of your school or the wider community in which
you live)?
       No, I have not had to or thought I needed to think about that.

16. Have you limited the subject matter you teach in light of
"community standards" (of your school or the wider community in which
you live)?
        No, the art teacher can do what they want, however being mindful that
their art is viewed by the public in which they live and should be able to
defend it. It would be hypocritical to say one thing at school and do the
other at home however some subjects are better viewed in college and with a
more adult group.

17. Have you ever had to censor student work?
       Yes, I had a student who did a beautiful airbrush acrylic of a subject
that could be seen 2 ways. I had the student do it under the idea that I
wouldn't show it but I was sooooooo good in craftsmanship I had the
principal, and counselor look at it and tell me if they would show it. One
didn't see it as dirty, the other said no way. I said no way and the student
picked up all his work and refused me the right to show anything and left in
a huff. Now I say no way before it gets to that point.

18. Has anyone ever asked you to censor your students' art?
       Yes, way back in 1973 I was showing a group of Art 3 transfer graphics
and a student had used the nude back of a woman and mixed with other images
was a good montage composition. A school secretary complained that it was a
dirty picture and how dare I show it. I was appalled at her reaction because
it was harmless but I felt that if she felt that way I was not going to
offend her so I took it down. I refused to put up work in the office for a
few months.

 19. Have you attended an art gallery or museum show with your students
that was considered controversial?
       Yes, we have gone to shows at MOMA and other modern art formats and
they have been fine. The Kids understand the difference between art and
smut. We talk about if it was appropriate for the show to the public and
they like to discuss that. I was not ashamed nor worried bout it. I can't
protect them from the real world of art subject but they can make up their
own minds.

20. Have you attended an art gallery or museum show with your students
that was considered controversial?
        Yes, I don't like nudes that seem pornographic and make me feel bad
to look at them. I don't like subjects that are there to shock me and I can
always walk away if this happens.

Ken Schwab
San Jose, CA

---