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RE: thanks for info! re:colorblind

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From: Sears, Ellen (ESears_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Feb 13 2001 - 11:38:11 PST


Just remembered - I sent this almost a year and a half ago - Smithsonian
has an article out in a recent issue -

Previous posts -
12/99
"Last year (maybe) on this list, there was a small discussion about people
that see letters in color, a 'c' would be red, a 'b' pink and so on...
I meant to send this last week, but Discover magazine's December issue has
an entire article in it about this condition. I don't have the magazine
with me, and the web site doesn't have December's articles up yet - but I
just wanted to share this - I thought it was interesting.
It also lists a few artists that have or may have had this
ability/affliction.
check you library, or the web site in a few days - www.discover.com

It's not just seeing letters and colors - spoken sounds, music calling up
colors or evoking taste, touch, sound and odor - up to 19 different types of
synesthesia (syn-together, aishesis - to perceive). Popular at the turn of
the 20th century, interest died off when it couldn't be explained or shared.

Kandinsky may have been an 'invented' synesthete ... claimed the condition
to inflate is reputation during synesthesia-struck Europe. David Hockney is
a synesthete.

Estimates are that perhaps one in 2,000 people are synesthetic. The article
is great.
Ellen"

> ----------
> From: Laurel
> Reply To: ArtsEdNet Talk
> Sent: Monday, February 12, 2001 8:00 PM
> To: ArtsEdNet Talk
> Subject: thanks for info! re:colorblind
>
> Thanks to all who wrote back about the colorblind issue. It gives me more
>
> to think about plus ideas to "help" those students. This list is great!
>
> ---
>

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