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Re: inner city teaching prob

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From: felsecker1 (felsecker_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon Feb 12 2001 - 15:10:30 PST


I ALWAYS have a seating chart for those same reasons! If they start to
whine, I tell them I'll consider changing once I get to know
everyone..notice that the word is "consider". I also have the option of
changing seats ANY time someone demonstrates they CAN'T handle the freedom
of sitting next to someone they do know. That is one way I feel a sense of
control and one thing I'll never change! Let's face it--in the art room
there are students of all abilities who just can't cope with the freedom and
who do not have the maturity to stay focused on the assignments/projects
they are asked to do.
BF
----- Original Message -----
From: <Nnaell@aol.com>
To: ArtsEdNet Talk <artsednet@lists.getty.edu>
Sent: Monday, February 12, 2001 9:48 AM
Subject: Re: inner city teaching prob

> I found...as a new teacher...the best way to establish who is "boss" in
your room is to make a seating chart. I know this might sound silly for
older students. But what you are actually doing is saying...in a not so
subtle way..that you control that space. Also, I find it is easier to learn
names when you have a seating chart. It is very hard to get a student's
attention when you have to call out "you, hey you". Much better to have a
seating chart ahead of time and memorize it. That way, the kids are shocked
that you know their name on the first day of class!!
>
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