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Fwd: NEH Outlook, February 2001

---------

JEMILTD_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Sat Feb 10 2001 - 18:29:30 PST


In a message dated 2/9/01 9:34:35 PM Central Standard Time,
subscribe@linux2.neh.gov writes:

<< --NEH-funded PBS documentaries in February
    *Fri., Feb. 2 (9-11:00 p.m. ET)--"Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey"
 (NEH funding: $600,000). Bunche (1903-1971), the first person of color to
 receive the Nobel Peace Prize, made outstanding contributions to
 international diplomacy, world decolonization, peacekeeping, and human
 rights in pre-civil rights America. See http://pbs.org/ralphbunche.
 
    *Thurs., Feb. 8 (10-11 p.m. ET)-- "Goin' to Chicago" (NEH funding:
 $221,725). The story of the early 20th-century migration of millions of
 African Americans from the segregated rural South to the cities of the North
 and West. See http://www.pbs.org/whatson/press/winspring/goin_to_chi.html.
 
 
    *Mon., Feb. 12 (9-10:30 p.m. ET)--The American Experience "Marcus
 Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind" (NEH funding: $20,410). The story of
 the Jamaican immigrant to the United States who founded the Universal Negro
 Improvement Association in 1914. See http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/garvey.
 
    *Mon.-Wed., Feb. 19-21 (9 p.m. ET)--The American Experience "Abraham
 and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided" (NEH funding: $200,000). Their lives in
 the context of mid-19th century America. See
 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/lincolns.
 
    --Two NEH-funded films are a step closer to winning this year's
 Academy Award for best documentary film. "Coming to Light: Edward S. Curtis
 and the North American Indians" (NEH funding: $223,090)
 (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/database/curtis_e.html) and
 "Scottsboro: An American Tragedy" (NEH funding: $462,000)
 (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/scottsboro/index.html), both scheduled to air
 on PBS this spring, are on the short list of 12 documentaries from which the
 five Oscar nominations will be selected later this year. "Coming to Light"
 is the story of Edward Curtis, an ethnographer who for more than 30 years
 during the early 20th century conducted a monumental photographic survey of
 native North Americans. "Scottsboro" relates a 1931 incident that generated
 two momentous Supreme Court decisions and gave rise to the civil rights
 movement.
 
    --NEH-funded exhibitions
    * Feb. 21-May 13: "Taoism and the Arts of China" (NEH funding:
 $325,000), Asian Art Museum of San Francisco (http://www.asianart.org).
 
    * March 5-April 15: "History Through Deaf Eyes" (NEH funding:
 $145,000), Phoenix Home Life Mutual Insurance Company Building, Hartford,
 Conn. (http://depts.gallaudet.edu/deafeyes). To schedule this traveling
 exhibition, email project director Jean Bergey at jean.bergey@gallaudet.edu.
 
    * March 24-Oct. 21: "2001: Building for Space Travel" (NEH funding:
 $235,000), Art Institute of Chicago
 (http://www.artic.edu/aic/exhibitions/space.html).
 
    * Through April 8: "From Paris to Providence: Fashion, Art, and the
 Tirocchi Dressmaker's Shop, 1915-1947" (NEH funding: $130,750), Rhode Island
 School of Design's Museum of Art, Providence, R.I. (http://www.risd.edu).
>>

attached mail follows:


    NEH OUTLOOK
    A MONTHLY E-MAIL NEWSLETTER OF THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE
HUMANITIES
    (http://www.neh.gov)
    FEBRUARY 2001

    CHAIRMAN'S NOTE
    by William R. Ferris, Chairman
    I would like to welcome you to this issue of Outlook with a reminder
that NEH has a number of publications aimed at engaging our various
audiences.

    For applicants, our new program and application guide-- "NEH Grant
Programs 2000-2001"--is available both in print and online at
http://www.neh.gov/grants/onebook.html to help simplify the application
process.

    For those interested in NEH's plans for the future, we now have the
NEH working group papers both in print and online at
http://www.neh.gov/publications/workingpapers.html) and the NEH Strategic
Plan, 2001-2005, online as a pdf file at
http://www.neh.gov/pdf/other/plan2001-05.pdf.

    For those interested in reviews of current NEH projects, we have the
bimonthly Humanities magazine, available by subscription at
http://www.neh.gov/publications/humanities/hm_order.html.

    For family historians of all ages, the "My History Is America's
History" guidebook is also in print and online at http://www.myhistory.org
to encourage all to share and preserve family stories and treasures.

    And for the generally curious, we have this monthly newsletter--NEH
Outlook--available for free by sending an e-mail to newsletter@neh.gov with
the word "subscribe" typed in the body of the message. The subscription
robot will automatically load your address into the newsletter listserv.

    I am pleased to report that in April NEH will announce the first
round of grants to state humanities councils under our Initiative for Online
State Encyclopedias. We received 19 applications that will be reviewed at
the next National Council meeting on March 26-27. The next application
deadline is July 1. State councils will find the program description and
application materials in the NEH program book under "Preservation, Access,
and Reference Works" (http://www.neh.gov/grants/onebook/preservation.html).

       
    While we were unable to get last year's 10 nominees for the National
Council on the Humanities confirmed by the Senate during the last session,
the White House recess-appointed them to the Council in late December.
These new appointees will serve on the Council as we continue to work with
Congress to get them confirmed for regular terms. We look forward to
introducing them at the March 26-27 Council meeting.

    Finally, this year's Jefferson Lecture by playwright Arthur Miller
on March 26 at Washington's Kennedy Center promises to be a full house.
Announcements through the Washington Post, the Chronicle of Higher
Education, and the trade publications Playbill and Back Stage have reached a
wide and interested audience. Our press release is online at
http://www.neh.gov/news/archive/20010104.html. To receive an invitation,
please leave your mailing address on our voice mail at (202) 606-8400. We
look forward to a great event.

    HELP US IMPROVE THE NEH GRANT PROCESS
    We invite your suggestions on how to streamline and improve our
grant application and administrative procedures. NEH and the other
grantmaking federal agencies have been working to improve the effectiveness
and performance of federal grant programs. Issues being discussed are
increased electronic processing in grant-program administration, development
of common application forms and reporting systems, and simplification of
grant application and reporting requirements. Getting suggestions from our
grant applicants and recipients is an important part of this effort. We
welcome your ideas for making it easier to apply for and report on grants
from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Please take a moment to
fill out and send our online questionnaire at
http://www.neh.gov/whoweare/pl106.asp. We need your responses by March 19.
Thanks very much.

    NEH WORKSHOPS
    --Feb. 5: NEH Grant Application Workshop, American Association of
State Colleges and Universities, Washington, D.C. Information: (202)
293-7070.
    --Feb. 9-10: Extending the Reach workshops. University of South
Florida-St. Petersburg. NEH contact: Anne Lopez-Buitrago, (202) 606-8575,
alopez-buitrago@neh.gov.
    --Feb. 10: Extending the Reach workshop. Buffalo Bill Historical
Center, Cody, Wyo. NEH contact: John Meredith, (202) 606-8218,
jmeredith@neh.gov.
    --Feb. 16: Extending the Reach workshop. University Center,
University of Missouri-Kansas City. NEH contact: Robert Sayers, (202)
606-8214. Reservations: William Worley, Director of the Kansas City
Regional History Institute, (816) 235-1339, worleyw@umkc.edu.
    --March 19: Regional application-writing workshop. College of
William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va. Registration and information contact:
Mike Ludwick, mike.ludwick@wm.edu.
    --March 22: Regional application-writing workshop. University of
Kentucky, Lexington. Registration and information contact: Margot
McCullers, mmcculle@pop.uky.edu.

    REQUEST FOR COMING UP TALLER NOMINATIONS
    March 16 is the postmark deadline for nominations for the fourth
annual Coming Up Taller (CUT) Awards, a program of the President's Committee
on the Arts and the Humanities in partnership with the National Endowment
for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts. CUT awards
honor outstanding community arts and humanities programs held during
out-of-school time that celebrate the creativity of young people and provide
them with safe havens and new learning opportunities. Honorees receive a
$10,000 award. For a nomination packet and list of previous award
recipients, see http://www.cominguptaller.org/new.html.

    PUBLIC PROGRAM NEWS
    --Jan.-March 2001: NEH Public Programs nationwide
(http://www.neh.gov/exhibits/index.html).

    --NEH-funded PBS documentaries in February
    *Fri., Feb. 2 (9-11:00 p.m. ET)--"Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey"
(NEH funding: $600,000). Bunche (1903-1971), the first person of color to
receive the Nobel Peace Prize, made outstanding contributions to
international diplomacy, world decolonization, peacekeeping, and human
rights in pre-civil rights America. See http://pbs.org/ralphbunche.

    *Thurs., Feb. 8 (10-11 p.m. ET)-- "Goin' to Chicago" (NEH funding:
$221,725). The story of the early 20th-century migration of millions of
African Americans from the segregated rural South to the cities of the North
and West. See http://www.pbs.org/whatson/press/winspring/goin_to_chi.html.

    *Mon., Feb. 12 (9-10:30 p.m. ET)--The American Experience "Marcus
Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind" (NEH funding: $20,410). The story of
the Jamaican immigrant to the United States who founded the Universal Negro
Improvement Association in 1914. See http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/garvey.

    *Mon.-Wed., Feb. 19-21 (9 p.m. ET)--The American Experience "Abraham
and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided" (NEH funding: $200,000). Their lives in
the context of mid-19th century America. See
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/lincolns.

    --Two NEH-funded films are a step closer to winning this year's
Academy Award for best documentary film. "Coming to Light: Edward S. Curtis
and the North American Indians" (NEH funding: $223,090)
(http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/database/curtis_e.html) and
"Scottsboro: An American Tragedy" (NEH funding: $462,000)
(http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/scottsboro/index.html), both scheduled to air
on PBS this spring, are on the short list of 12 documentaries from which the
five Oscar nominations will be selected later this year. "Coming to Light"
is the story of Edward Curtis, an ethnographer who for more than 30 years
during the early 20th century conducted a monumental photographic survey of
native North Americans. "Scottsboro" relates a 1931 incident that generated
two momentous Supreme Court decisions and gave rise to the civil rights
movement.

    --NEH-funded exhibitions
    * Feb. 21-May 13: "Taoism and the Arts of China" (NEH funding:
$325,000), Asian Art Museum of San Francisco (http://www.asianart.org).

    * March 5-April 15: "History Through Deaf Eyes" (NEH funding:
$145,000), Phoenix Home Life Mutual Insurance Company Building, Hartford,
Conn. (http://depts.gallaudet.edu/deafeyes). To schedule this traveling
exhibition, email project director Jean Bergey at jean.bergey@gallaudet.edu.

    * March 24-Oct. 21: "2001: Building for Space Travel" (NEH funding:
$235,000), Art Institute of Chicago
(http://www.artic.edu/aic/exhibitions/space.html).

    * Through April 8: "From Paris to Providence: Fashion, Art, and the
Tirocchi Dressmaker's Shop, 1915-1947" (NEH funding: $130,750), Rhode Island
School of Design's Museum of Art, Providence, R.I. (http://www.risd.edu).

    RESEARCH PROGRAM NEWS
    --At the 2001 American Historical Association annual meeting in
Boston, Jan. 4-7, NEH-funded scholars received the following AHA honors for
their work:

    * Prize in Atlantic History
    Karen Ordahl Kupperman (1989 NEH centers fellowship)
    "Indians and English: Facing Off in Early America" (Cornell
University Press, 2000).

    * Joan Kelly Memorial Prize for best work in women's history
    Elizabeth Thompson (1999 NEH centers fellowship)
    "Colonial Citizens: Republican Rights, Paternal Privilege, and
Gender in French Syria and Lebanon" (Columbia University Press, 2000).

    * Littleton-Griswold Prize for best book on the history of American
law and society
    Gail Williams O'Brien (1989 NEH travel to collections grant, 1993
NEH fellowship)
    "The Color of the Law: Race, Violence, and Justice in the Post-World
War II South" (University of North Carolina Press, 1999).

    * J. Russell Major Prize for best work in English on any aspect of
French history
     Daniel J. Sherman (1988 NEH summer stipend, 1990 NEH fellowship)
    "The Construction of Memory in Interwar France" (University of
Chicago Press, 1999).

    EDUCATION PROGRAM NEWS
    -- EDSITEment (http://edsitement.neh.gov), NEH'S online collection
of 105 top humanities websites for use in the K-12 classroom, has two new
features--NEH Spotlight and Calendar. NEH Spotlight showcases outstanding
NEH-supported projects that have K-12 relevance. In January the spotlight
was on Jazz; in February the spotlight is on projects related to African
American history. And Calendar lists websites and lesson plans of topical
interest each month. The February Calendar highlights EDSITEment websites
and lesson plans related to African American History month. The March
Calendar will highlight projects related to Women's History Month.

    --Speaking of women's history, the Women and Social Movements
website (http://womhist.binghamton.edu) --one of EDSITEment's
weblinks--recently created a teacher's corner with some 60 lesson plans and
assignments to facilitate high school and college use of the site's 500
primary documents in U.S. history courses. Documents cover women and social
reform in U.S. history from 1820 to 1940. By summer 2001 the site will
expand to include documents from 1776 to 1990.

    -- NEH since 1997 has worked with more than 35 federal agencies to
make available thousands of federally supported education resources at
Federal Resources for Educational Excellence (FREE)
(http://www.ed.gov/free), an award-winning website managed by the U.S.
Department of Education. FREE not only catalogs NEH's "My History is
America's History" website and the 105 EDSITEment links but also includes
websites that have emerged from NEH-funded projects. These websites include
the "Valley of the Shadow," "Art and Life in Africa Online," "Women Writers
Project," and most recently "Jazz." So far, more than 100 websites
connected with NEH-funded projects have been included in the database. If
you are an NEH grantee, have developed a website related to your project,
and would like to have it linked at FREE, please contact NEH's Jennifer
Serventi at jserventi@neh.gov.

    --Highlights of three NEH Extending the Reach workshops in Puerto
Rico, Jan. 22-23.
    * University of Puerto Rico: a technology demo including EDSITEment
and a segment on Internet sources in Spanish.
    * San Juan Universidad del Sagrado Corazon: presentation about the
NEH-funded Puerto Rican periodicals database.
    * Interamerican University of Puerto Rico: presentation about the
NEH-funded Humanities Scholar in Residence project, focusing on African
influences in Puerto Rican culture, at the Dr. Rafael Pujals School in
Ponce.

    STATE COUNCIL NEWS
    --For a complete roster of state humanities councils and links to
their websites, go to http://www.neh.gov/state/states.html.

    --Many state humanities councils support programs that benefit and
involve senior citizens. Here are examples of projects for seniors funded
by state councils and implemented within the last year:

    * Kansas Humanities Council
(http://www.ukans.edu/kansas/khc/mainpage.html)
    The council's partnership with the LIFE Project, a statewide
coalition seeking to improve end-of-life care, helps raise healthcare
professionals' understanding of end-of-life patient care through reading and
discussion of short fiction such as Wendell Berry's "Fidelity."

    * Maine Humanities Council (http://www.mainehumanities.org)
    The reading and discussion program "Literature and Medicine:
Humanities at the Heart of Health Care" provides hospital healthcare
professionals with opportunities to reflect on their roles. Several other
state councils, including the New Hampshire Humanities Council
(http://www.nhhc.org), fund similar programs. The Maine Council also
supports "I Remember...Mount Desert Island Families in the 20th Century," a
study of Maine island families through collection of oral histories and
artifacts.
     
    * Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities (http://www.mfh.org)
    Holyoke's Puerto Rican Living History and Culture Project enables
the city's youth to collect, interpret, and represent--through artwork,
theater, photography, and writing--their elders' knowledge and experience of
Puerto Rican history and culture. The project provides Puerto Rican youth
with a stronger sense of their cultural heritage and the adults the
opportunity to realize their role as repositories and teachers of that
heritage.

    * Michigan Humanities Council (http://mihumanities.h-net.msu.edu)
    The traveling exhibition "Our Village: Detroit's West Side,
1920-1950" was created by an African American senior community using
photographs, artifacts, and oral histories. Churches, clubs, families,
businesses, and schools participated.

    * Minnesota Humanities Commission (http://www.thinkmhc.org)
    As part of the council's Learning in Retirement Network, which
promotes older adult learning in the humanities, the Elder Reading
Initiative involves senior volunteers in reading aloud to residents of
senior living facilities.

    * South Carolina Humanities Council (http://www.schumanities.org)
    Oral history projects include Columbia's role in the civil rights
movement ("The 60s: The People, the Music, the Movement") and the 1968
Orangeburg Massacre ("An Oral History of the Orangeburg Massacre").

    * Vermont Council on the Humanities
(http://www.vermonthumanities.org)
    A project examining Winooski's industrial and cultural heritage
during the 19th- and 20th-century mill era gathers information from local
people either who worked in the mills or whose parents and grandparents
worked there.

    * Many state councils provide speakers and reenactors to senior
centers and elderhostels. Examples are a scholar portraying Colorado gold
miner and philanthropist Winfield Scott Stratton (Colorado Endowment for
the Humanities-- http://www.ceh.org), a speaker on Iowa's railroads
(Humanities Iowa-- http://www.uiowa.edu/~humiowa), and a scholar of the
Santa Fe Trail (New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities--
http://www.nmeh.org).

    * Many library reading and discussion programs supported by the
state councils include topics of special interest to seniors. For example,
the Idaho Humanities Council's (http://www2.state.id.us/ihc/ihc.htm) "Let's
Talk About It" program includes readings on the theme "Growing Older." And
the Arkansas Humanities Council (http://www.arkhums.org) supports a literacy
program that brings together senior citizens with children and their parents
for intergenerational reading activities.

    CHAIRMAN'S SCHEDULE HIGHLIGHTS
    Feb. 6: Chairman's forum, Gwendolyn Midlo Hall--NEH headquarters,
Washington, D.C.
    March 12: Visit--University of California, Santa Cruz.
    March 13: Visit--University of California, Berkeley.
    March 30: Keynote address, Phi Theta Kappa International Honor
Society, 83rd International Convention--Denver, Colo.

    SUBSCRIBE to HUMANITIES, NEH's award-winning bimonthly magazine--$24
for six issues. Subscription form:
http://www.neh.gov/publications/humanities/hm_order.html. Past issues:
http://www.neh.gov/publications/humanities/index.html.

    SUBSCRIBE to NEH OUTLOOK: Send an e-mail to newsletter@neh.gov with
the word "subscribe" typed in the body of the message. The subscription
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    Past issues: Go to http://www.neh.gov/news/outlook/index.html.

    Comments: Send to outlook@neh.gov.

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