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Lesson Plans


Re: Winter Solstice - Yule

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Sharon Heneborn (heneborn)
Tue, 21 Dec 1999 19:58:54 -0500


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Isn't Wednesday named for Woden Norse god of the wind? Woden's day,
Thor's day, and Freja's day

Speaking of the Druids. I understand that they sacrificed babies at
this time of the year and hung them on branches of evergreen trees.
The missionaries eventually convinced them to substitute dolls for the
live babies. The beginning of another tradition! Haven't looked at a
Christmas tree the same since I learned that historical tidbit.
Having lived through a few long harsh winters on the North Sea I can
understand the extreme measures a people might take to ensure that the
sun would return. I lived in a tightly built house with nice warm
fireplaces and electric lights (well most of he time) in every room
and, when I think about it, I can still feel the bone chilling cold of
the long dark winter. Can only imagine what it would be like to be a
Druid.

----------
From: "Lawrence A. Parker/OCCTI" <occti>
Subject: Winter Solstice - Yule
Date: Tue, Dec 21, 1999, 1:23 PM

----- Original Message -----
From: Bo <bowillis>
To: Human_ism <Human_ism>
Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 1999 12:40 PM
Subject: [Human_ism] Winter Solicit

Today is Winter Solstice, and to all my pagan friends (and enemies)
Happy Holidays. A few facts about this celebration.

Christmas was once a moveable feast celebrated many different times
during the year. The choice of December 25 was made by the Pope Julius
I in the fourth century AD because this coincided with the pagan
rituals of Winter Solstice, or Return of the Sun. The intent was to
replace the pagan celebration with the Christian one.

Before Christianity the Swedish people celebrated "midvinterblot" at
winter solstice. It simply means "mid-winter-blood", and featured both
animal and human sacrifice. This tradition took place at certain cult
places, and basically every old Swedish church is built on such a
place. The pagan tradition was finally abandoned around 1200 AD, due
to the missionaries persistence. (Of course they were sacrificed too,
by the Vikings, in the beginning.) Midvinterblot paid tribute to the
local gods, appealing to them to let go of the winter's grip. The
winters in Scandinavia are dark and grim, and these were the days
before central heating. And the Gods were powerful. To this day
Thursday is named after the war god Thor. Friday after Freja
(fertility) It is interesting to note that to this day the Swedish
name for Christmas is Jul (Yule), and the Jul gnome has a more
important role than Christmas father or the Christchild. You don't
kill those pagan traditions easily. The old Viking religion with Thor
and his friends is still practiced by some people, somewhat less
bloodily.

Winter Solstice celebrations are held on the eve of the shortest day
of the year. During the first millennium in what is today Scotland,
the Druids celebrated Winter Solstice honoring their Sun God and
rejoicing his return as the days got longer, signaling the coming of
spring. This tradition still lives today in the Wiccan traditions and
in many cultures around the world.

Bo
"The approach of Christmas brings harassment and dread to many
excellent people. They have to buy a cart-load of presents, and they
never know what to buy to hit the various tastes; they put in three
weeks of hard and anxious work, and when Christmas morning comes they
are so dissatisfied with the result, and so disappointed that they
want to sit down and cry. Then they give thanks that Christmas comes
but once a year."
- Following the Equator----Mark Twain

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Re: Winter Solstice - Yule Isn't Wednesday named for Woden Norse god of the wind?  Woden's day, T= hor's day, and Freja's day

Speaking of the Druids.  I understand that they sacrificed babies at t= his time of the year and hung them on branches of evergreen trees.  The= missionaries eventually convinced them to substitute dolls for the live bab= ies.  The beginning of another tradition!  Haven't looked at a Chr= istmas tree the same since I learned that historical tidbit.   Hav= ing lived through a few long harsh winters on the North Sea  I can unde= rstand the extreme measures a people might take to ensure that the sun would= return.  I lived in a tightly built house with nice warm fireplaces an= d electric lights (well most of he time) in every room and, when I think abo= ut it, I can still feel the bone chilling cold of the long dark winter. &nbs= p;Can only imagine what it would be like to be a Druid.

----------
From: "Lawrence A. Parker/OCCTI" <occti>
Subject: Winter Solstice - Yule
Date: Tue, Dec 21, 1999, 1:23 PM


 
----- Original Message -----
From: Bo <bowillis= >  
To: Human_ism <Human_ism@onelist.= com>  
Sent: Tuesday, December 21, 1999 12:40 PM
Subject: [Human_ism] Winter Solicit

Today is Winter Solstice, and to all my p= agan friends (and enemies) Happy Holidays.  A few facts about this cele= bration.
 
 
Christmas was once a moveable feast celeb= rated many different times during the year. The choice of December 25 was ma= de by the Pope Julius I in the fourth century AD because this coincided with= the pagan rituals of Winter Solstice, or Return of the Sun. The intent was = to replace the pagan celebration with the Christian one.  
 
Before Christianity the Swedish people ce= lebrated "midvinterblot" at winter solstice. It simply means "= ;mid-winter-blood", and featured both animal and human sacrifice. This = tradition took place at certain cult places, and basically every old Swedish= church is built on such a place. The pagan tradition was finally abandoned = around 1200 AD, due to the missionaries persistence. (Of course they were sa= crificed too, by the Vikings, in the beginning.) Midvinterblot paid tribute = to the local gods, appealing to them to let go of the winter's grip. The win= ters in Scandinavia are dark and grim, and these were the days before centra= l heating. And the Gods were powerful. To this day Thursday is named after t= he war god Thor. Friday after Freja (fertility) It is interesting to note th= at to this day the Swedish name for Christmas is Jul (Yule), and the Jul gno= me has a more important role than Christmas father or the Christchild. You d= on't kill those pagan traditions easily. The old Viking religion with Thor a= nd his friends is still practiced by some people, somewhat less bloodily. &n= bsp;
 
Winter Solstice celebrations are held on = the eve of the shortest day of the year. During the first millennium in what= is today Scotland, the Druids celebrated Winter Solstice honoring their Sun= God and rejoicing his return as the days got longer, signaling the coming o= f spring. This tradition still lives today in the Wiccan traditions and in m= any cultures around the world.
 
Bo
"The approach of Christmas brings harassment and dread to many excelle= nt people. They have to buy a cart-load of presents, and they never know wha= t to buy to hit the various tastes; they put in three weeks of hard and anxi= ous work, and when Christmas morning comes they are so dissatisfied with the= result, and so disappointed that they want to sit down and cry. Then they g= ive thanks that Christmas comes but once a year."
- Following the Equator----Mark Twain

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