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Lesson Plans


RE: artsednet-digest V2 #1137

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Claire Loughheed (ClaireLoughheed)
Thu, 24 Dec 1998 15:30:08 -0500


> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-artsednet-digest.edu
> [SMTP:owner-artsednet-digest.edu]
> Sent: Thursday, December 24, 1998 3:12 PM
> To: artsednet-digest.edu
> Subject: artsednet-digest V2 #1137
>
>
> artsednet-digest Thursday, December 24 1998 Volume 02 : Number
> 1137
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> SaxCatalog
> Cotton or Acrylic Gloves with Glue guns?
> Re: Colors
> Classroom Funnies
> Re: portraits
> teaching moment
> Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1136
> Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1136
> Re: Classroom Funnies
> funnies
> Eager Degas!
> FWD: ENGINEERS TAKE THE FUN OUT OF CHRISTMAS
> Re: a funny
> Re: Classroom funnies
> Fwd: Perky Paint
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 08:42:25 -0600
> From: "Nagel, Judy" <JNagel>
> Subject: SaxCatalog
>
> Happy Holidays to all! I have received inquiries regarding the arrival of
> the 1999 Sax Art Catalog. I am happy to say that you should be receiving
> your catalog any time now. They have already been mailed and some have
> already gotten theirs. If you do not have yours waiting for you when you
> return to school, please request one. I'll be interested in knowing if you
> like it! Thanks, Judy Nagel
>
> http://www.saxarts.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 10:12:09 -0500
> From: Claire Loughheed <ClaireLoughheed>
> Subject: Cotton or Acrylic Gloves with Glue guns?
>
> My experience with the acrylic gloves is that they don't melt--the child
> senses the heat through the glove and pulls their hand away before it's
> ever
> reached that point. Cotton gloves would work the same way but the reason
> why I prefer the acrylic gloves is that they stretch to fit and the
> elasticized cuff keeps them on. They're also easy to find in dollar
> stores
> and cheap. After a little while they tend to get gunked up with glue and
> need to be tossed. Still, when it's all said and done, it saves a lot of
> fingers from burns (or at least more serious burns) and when the
> glove-wearing is a policy you have something to cover you when a parent
> thinks you've failed to look out for their child. Every time there's been
> a
> burn and I've asked if the student was wearing gloves the answer has been
> no. The parent backs right off.
>
> Happy (and safe) holidays to everyone!
>
> Claire Loughheed
> Assistant Director of Education
> Worcester Art Museum
> 55 Salisbury St.
> Worcester, MA 01609
> ph: (508) 799-4406, ext. 3058
> fax: (508) 798-5646
> e-mail: claireloughheed
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 09:18:34 -0600
> From: gregjuli
> Subject: Re: Colors
>
> To whom ever started the "classroom funnies", thanks so much. I have
> really
> enjoyed sitting down to the computer for my daily laugh. This time of
> year I
> really need it, especially with the stress of the holidays and school
> stuff.
> This is a fun group!
> Hope everyone gets their energy renewed during your winter break.
> Happy Holidays
> MaryB
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 09:19:41 -0600
> From: gregjuli
> Subject: Classroom Funnies
>
> gregjuli wrote:
>
> > To whom ever started the "classroom funnies", thanks so much. I have
> really
> > enjoyed sitting down to the computer for my daily laugh. This time of
> year I
> > really need it, especially with the stress of the holidays and school
> stuff.
> > This is a fun group!
> > Hope everyone gets their energy renewed during your winter break.
> > Happy Holidays
> > MaryB
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 10:29:21 EST
> From: Bicyclken
> Subject: Re: portraits
>
> In a message dated 12/22/98 7:47:50 PM Pacific Standard Time,
> ArtAltman writes:
>
> << Also I was hoping to incorporate pastels or oil pastels
> in the final drawing. Do you have any ideas on how to incorporate
> pastels
> without loosing detail? >>
>
> Hello,
>
> I do an assignment in my Art 2 class that uses conte crayon on toned
> paper.
> This process helps them to see the range of dark to light and to
> accentuate
> the contrast of light. I begin like you have planned and have them draw
> each
> other for a practice, ( straight on). Next we look at resources that use
> a
> dominance of dark with strong highlights. We look for 3/4 views and
> profiles
> as well.
>
> When they have found something that is interesting we sketch it out on
> news
> print and transfer the outlines to toned(grey, canson mi-tientes) paper
> with
> carbon paper. By using only white conte, they begin to lay in the
> lightest
> values, when finished they look at the darkest and use black. Tortillons
> are
> used to soften the conte into the paper and by leaving a majority of grey
> paper they can see the portrait.
>
> This would take more than 8 days but you might like it.
>
> Ken Schwab
> San Jose, CA
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 13:09:57 EST
> From: PurpleArt
> Subject: teaching moment
>
> Hi -- I have enjoyed reading the classroom funnies this week! Wanted to
> share
> a more tender moment that happened to me yesterday. A fifth grade Bosnian
> immigrant student (girl) gave me a tiny (1" x 1") white porcelin bird with
> gold trim, and said to me, "This comes to you with all of my respect and
> love."
> What a sweetheart. I love my art teaching job! Happy Holidays to all!
> from Lisa in SD, where the wind chill is 25 below...
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 14:04:54 EST
> From: MPBC90
> Subject: Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1136
>
> << they were startled, zipped up their pants, and got back to work.
> After class the school nurse and I talked to them about appropriate
> behavior.
> By the way these were first grade boys.
> Sheldon >>
> My first year teaching, a first grade boy asked if he could go to the
> bathroom. I had been told NOT to let them go (our bathroom is downstairs
> from
> my art room, and just too far away) unless it was an "emergency." I said
> "no,
> just wait a few more minutes." Near the end of class, when another boy
> asked
> again, only this time clutching his privates, I quickly allowed it. Not
> realizing just how much those little imps are watching everything, I was
> suddenly encircled by 14 little boys clutching and squeezing their little
> pee
> pees groaning that they really had to go! Of course, the principal walked
> in
> JUST then, wondering just whatI had done to them! Jeez...can you tell I
> am a
> mother of three girls?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 14:04:42 EST
> From: MPBC90
> Subject: Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1136
>
> << they were startled, zipped up their pants, and got back to work.
> After class the school nurse and I talked to them about appropriate
> behavior.
> By the way these were first grade boys.
> Sheldon >>
> My first year teaching, a first grade boy asked if he could go to the
> bathroom. I had been told NOT to let them go (our bathroom is downstairs
> from
> my art room, and just too far away) unless it was an "emergency." I said
> "no,
> just wait a few more minutes." Near the end of class, when another boy
> asked
> again, only this time clutching his privates, I quickly allowed it. Not
> realizing just how much those little imps are watching everything, I was
> suddenly encircled by 14 little boys clutching and squeezing their little
> pee
> pees groaning that they really had to go! Of course, the principal walked
> in
> JUST then, wondering just whatI had done to them! Jeez...can you tell I
> am a
> mother of three girls?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 13:28:04
> From: Jerry & Anne Carman-Hendel <hendel>
> Subject: Re: Classroom Funnies
>
> I also want to add my thanks for the many helpful ideas and resources
> that I have received from this group. I feel less isolated and when I
> check
> in, always read about others who are doing what I'm doing. I wish all of
> you health and happiness in the coming year.
>
> The funnies are great! Let me add on...
>
> *A few years ago the fifth graders were working on coil handbuilding.
> It is our practice at the end of class to wrap the pottery in moist, not
> sopping (something I make a big point of...), towels and put them in a
> plastic bag. This particular day, I lost track of time and exclaimed, "Oh!
> It's time to clean up. Go to your sinks and get your damp paper towels!"
> The room became very quiet. I said to the student next to me, "What
> did
> I say?" He diplomatically replied, "They didn't hear the 'p' in damp.
>
> *I love the paper one of our teachers got on Abraham Lincoln. One
> line
> read, "Lincoln was elected after he exposed himself."
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 15:00:31 EST
> From: RWilk85411
> Subject: funnies
>
> I have already related the Penthouse/Playboy story from my first year
> teaching. But this one is amusing also. This too is from my first year,
> 1969.
> There are so many in between that I find it difficult to remember them
> all.
> Here goes.
> I was employed to teach in a school "across the river." That was
> equivalent to
> "on the wrong side of the tracks." I was vaguely aware of the reputation
> of
> the area. I was vaguely aware of a lot of things in those days. Anyway. I
> had
> gathered several of those small milk cartons used in school lunch rooms.
> My
> intent was to cut the tops off and use them to dispense and store tempera.
> I
> was in my "trade school" (kids who went to trade school half the day)
> class
> when I decided to prepare the cartons. I realized that I did not have
> anything
> that would cut the cartons. Being fresh out of school and having led a
> sheltered life, I innocently asked if anyone had a knife. I was looking
> down
> at the cartons when I said this. I heard this strange clicking sound. I
> looked
> up to see several switch blades being flicked open. My mouth was still
> hanging
> way down when one young man sauntered up to the table and threw his brass
> knuckles down saying, "Here, teach, use these on him." I finally got my
> wits
> about me and explained that I only wanted to cut some milk cartons. While
> they
> were somewhat disappointed that there was not going to be a rumble, they
> set
> about cutting the milk cartons for me. then we discussed the legality of
> having such weapons at school or anywhere for that matter. They assured me
> they would not bring them to school anymore. Yeah, right! I made sure that
> I
> bought a utility knife. Of course these guys became my favorite group.
> Reatha
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 17:20:14 -0400
> From: Sara Gustafson <britgirl>
> Subject: Eager Degas!
>
> I can't resist chiming in with another classroom funny. About 6 years
> ago I used to have an "Art Smart" quiz that I would do with my elem.
> students. Each week I would announce the question of the week over the
> intercom, and the first 5 or so to give me the answer would receive
> their name up on a board as well as a little treat. Often the question
> would relate to something we had recently studied. One week the
> question was "Name the Impressionist artist who painted many pictures of
> ballerina's." I had students rushing to tell me the answer, they
> remembered it was Edgar Degas. The pronunciation sometimes got to them,
> and I will never forget the little boy who eagerly told me the answer
> was "Eager Dee Gas!" If you say this out loud it sounds so funny! Every
> time I see Degas, I think of poor old "Eager!"
>
> Sara in coastal NC where it is freeeeezing!!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 13:35:24 -0800
> From: lincarts (Lincoln Arts)
> Subject: FWD: ENGINEERS TAKE THE FUN OUT OF CHRISTMAS
>
> I don't care what the engineers say - science isn't everything; I still
> believe!
> Jeanne
> - ----------------
>
> There are approximately two billion children (persons under 18) in the
> world. However, since Santa does not visit children of Muslim, Hindu,
> Jewish or Buddhist (except maybe in Japan) religions and doesn't see
> Orthodox children until 3 Kings Day, this reduces the workload for
> Christmas
> night to 15% of the
> total, or 378 million (according to the population reference bureau).
>
> At an average (census) rate of 3.5 children per household, that comes to
> 108
> million homes, presuming there is at least one good child in each. Santa
> has about 31 hours of Christmas to work with, thanks to the different time
> zones and the rotation of the earth, assuming east to west (which seems
> logical).
>
> This works out to 967.7 visits per second. This is to say that for each
> Christian household with a good child, Santa has around 1/1000th of a
> second
> to park the sleigh, hop out, jump down the chimney, fill the stocking,
> distribute the remaining presents under the tree, eat whatever snacks have
> been left for him, get back up the chimney, jump into the sleigh and get
> onto the next
> house.
>
> Assuming that each of these 108 million stops is evenly distributed around
> the earth (which, of course, we know to be false, but will accept for the
> purposes of our calculations), we are now talking about 0.78 miles per
> household; a total trip of 75.5 million miles, not counting bathroom stops
> or breaks. This
> means Santa's sleigh is moving at 650 miles per second--3,000 times the
> speed of sound.
>
> For purposes of comparison, the fastest man-made vehicle, the Ulysses
> space
> probe, moves at a poky 27.4 miles per second, and a conventional reindeer
> can run (at best) 15 miles per hour.
>
> The payload of the sleigh adds another interesting elements. Assuming
> that
> each child gets nothing more than a medium sized LEGO set (two pounds),
> the
> sleigh is carrying over 500 thousand tons, not counting Santa himself.
>
> On land, a conventional reindeer can pull no more than 300 pounds. Even
> granting that the "flying" reindeer can pull 10 times the normal amount,
> the
> job can't be done with eight or even nine of them---Santa would need
> 360,000
> of them.
>
> This increases the payload, not counting the weight of the sleigh, another
> 54,000 tons, or roughly seven times the weight of the Queen Elizabeth (the
> ship not the monarch). 600,000 tons traveling at 650 miles per second
> creates enormous air resistance - this would heat up reindeer in the same
> fashion as a spacecraft reentering the earth's atmosphere. The lead pair
> of
> reindeer
> would absorb 14.3 quintillion joules of energy per second each. In short,
> they would burst into flames almost instantaneously, exposing the reindeer
> behind them and creating deafening sonic booms in their wake. The entire
> reindeer team would be vaporized within 4.2 thousandths of a second, or
> right about the time Santa reached the fifth house on his trip.
>
> Not that it matters, however, since Santa, as a result of accelerating
> from
> a dead stop to 650 m.p.s. in seconds, would be subjected to acceleration
> forces of 17,000 g's. A 250 pound Santa (which seems ludicrously slim)
> would be pinned to the back of the sleigh by 4,315,015 pounds of force,
> instantly crushing his bones and organs and reducing him to a quivering
> blob
> of pink goo.
>
> Therefore, if Santa did exist, he's dead now.
>
> Merry Christmas
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 23 Dec 1998 17:15:53 -0800
> From: "R.E.William Loring" <bcloring>
> Subject: Re: a funny
>
> In the early seventies I was teaching an advanced composition class...you
> know how you get to teach a lot of things with a k-12 certificate?
> Anyway,
> it was a huge group of college bound (sort of) seniors and most of them
> would "smke their lunch" I had an
> awful time staying with the curriculum and had a contact high half the
> time.
> We were supposed to be reading Joyce Carol Oates "Upon The Sweeping Flood"
> I
> knew those wasted rangers weren"t up to it, so one rainy day they filed in
> and I decided to
> read the story to them. I read it in my most theatrical style...the
> students were mesmerised. The mostly male audience st spellbound as I
> read.
> The bell rang and they filed out. I sat there and congratulated myself on
> a
> fabulous "teaching" moment.
> One of the few girls came back in the room and I thought she was moved by
> the story. She said,"uh, YOur blouse is unbuttoned to your waist"
> remember
> those slinky silky blouses? Of course I was wearing my nasty push em up
> and
> salute bra...
> I left an indelible impression on some of those impressionable little
> minds.
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: MPBC90 <MPBC90>
> To: artsednet.edu <artsednet.edu>
> Date: Wednesday, December 23, 1998 11:21 AM
> Subject: Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1136
>
>
> >
> ><< they were startled, zipped up their pants, and got back to work.
> > After class the school nurse and I talked to them about appropriate
> behavior.
> > By the way these were first grade boys.
> > Sheldon >>
> >My first year teaching, a first grade boy asked if he could go to the
> >bathroom. I had been told NOT to let them go (our bathroom is downstairs
> from
> >my art room, and just too far away) unless it was an "emergency." I said
> "no,
> >just wait a few more minutes." Near the end of class, when another boy
> asked
> >again, only this time clutching his privates, I quickly allowed it. Not
> >realizing just how much those little imps are watching everything, I was
> >suddenly encircled by 14 little boys clutching and squeezing their little
> pee
> >pees groaning that they really had to go! Of course, the principal
> walked
> in
> >JUST then, wondering just whatI had done to them! Jeez...can you tell I
> am
> a
> >mother of three girls?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 01:36:57 -0400
> From: Victor Capone <viccapone>
> Subject: Re: Classroom funnies
>
> This is like the 'F encyclopedia story.' My brother teaches woodshop,
> and for one of his projects, all the pieces were lettered. During his
> instructions, he made a reference to the "F and G's." The next day he
> realized the power of example as students throughout the room made
> references to F-ing hammers, F-ing wood, F-ing tools, etc.
>
> Victor
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 15:13:14 EST
> From: Maahmaah
> Subject: Fwd: Perky Paint
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
> - --part0_914530395_boundary
> Content-ID: <0_914530395.com.1>
> Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
>
> Hi,
> Thought I would pass on this e-mail I just got in response to the "rotting
> paint" thread. Has anyone heard of this product? Sounds good considering
> that the smell of paint-gone-bad never quite fades from memory.
> - -Lee
>
> - --part0_914530395_boundary
> Content-ID: <0_914530395.net.2>
> Content-type: message/rfc822
> Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
> Content-disposition: inline
>
> Return-Path: <perkypaint>
> Received: from rly-yc03.mx.aol.com (rly-yc03.mail.aol.com
> [172.18.149.35]) by
> air-yc02.mail.aol.com (v55.3) with SMTP; Thu, 24 Dec 1998 14:29:16
> -0500
> Received: from mailhost.chi.ameritech.net (mpdr0.chicago.il.ameritech.net
> [206.141.239.142])
> by rly-yc03.mx.aol.com (8.8.8/8.8.5/AOL-4.0.0)
> with ESMTP id OAA24173 for <Maahmaah>;
> Thu, 24 Dec 1998 14:29:14 -0500 (EST)
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> (InterMail v03.02.07 118 124) with SMTP
> id <19981224192857.BTDX29906@default> for <Maahmaah>;
> Thu, 24 Dec 1998 13:28:57 -0600
> Message-ID: <36829500.44F3>
> Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 13:24:48 -0600
> From: Steve Patras <perkypaint>
> Reply-To: perkypaint
> X-Mailer: Mozilla 3.01C-AIT (Win95; U)
> To: Maahmaah
> Subject: Perky Paint
> Mime-Version: 1.0
> Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
> Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
>
> Hello,
>
> I saw your question on artsednet. website about your tempera paint
> spoiling. Sad to say, this happens a lot. Paint is, in essence, a live
> medium. It has bacteria in it and will go bad just like a rancid piece
> of meat.
>
> I do have the solution to this problem! I sell Perky Paint(TM) which
> has a guarantee never to spoil, separate or smell bad. When Perky Paint
> is manufactured, we take out the bacteria; in effect we pasteurize it!
>
> Perky Paint has many other excellent qualities as well as never
> spoiling. The colors are bright and beautiful and stay that way when
> they dry. It will not flake or crack off of the paper as most tempera
> will. Perky Paint is truly washable as well.
>
> Best of all is the price; only $13.50 per gallon and we offer freight
> incentives as well.
>
> I would be glad to send you a sample of this great paint if your
> interested. Call me at 888-883-7422 or e-mail me from my website at
> www.perkypaint.com
>
> Thank you very much for your time and I hope I can be of some assitance
> to you in the future.
>
> Paul Patras
> Bright Ideas/Perky Paint
> Vice President
>
> - --part0_914530395_boundary--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #1137
> ********************************
>
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