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Lesson Plans


Re: High school HELP!

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Sharon Hause (smhause)
Thu, 17 Dec 1998 11:40:24 PST


One thing that I do with my art survey students (prerequisite
class) is to have them choose a master artist and create a series using
the grid in naturalistic or realist style in color pencil, then create a
collage of the same image with construction paper using conventional or
stylized form, then doing the image again only in abstract with pastel.
They are required to research the artist and turn in a 200 word paper on
the artist, movement, and why they chose that particular artist. You
do a grid and an abstract so you could possible change the curriculum
for next semester/year.

What about a printmaking unit? Collographs, momoprints, relief prints,
etc.
What about a painting unit? After creating a booklet of the color wheel
and color harmonies, the students create a final painting with one of
the seven color harmonies we study.

I 've never used a rubric...is there a form or outline to follow that I
could learn from? I teach high school and middle school art.

>Date: Wed, 16 Dec 1998 16:33:23 -0600
>From: Teri Sanford <terily>
>To: artsednet.edu
>Subject: High school HELP!
>
>Hello arties,
> I just love this list. I am hoping some of you can help me with a
problem. I have been teaching my first HS art
>class (just one each day, then elementary the rest of the day). I have
covered design elements, some drawing and
>enlarging with a grid, clay work, abstract designs with oil pastels. I
am at a loss for what to do next. I am
>definitely intimidated by these "big" kids. Even though my skills are
more than theirs, I still have a hard time
>with them not listening. Then when I grade them (rubric, provided
before each project) they still moan and groan
>and argue about their grades. They want this to be their "easy A"
class. I have some that are even failing,
>because they do not turn in any homework or assignments. I have
taught 8 years of K-5 and all my lessons are too
>easy. I have never had students like this. I need something that
will take these kids interest by storm. Does
>anyone have a set "curriculum" or series of lessons that they might
share with me? I would like to do some of the
>research necessary over the holiday break. I'm determined not to let
these kids get the best of me. (I've already
>survived the theft of every imaginable supply and still came back to
work!)
>
>Thanks in advance!
>
>teri sanford
>Hutto ISD
>Hutto, Texas
>
>

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