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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1107The value fo student art

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Christina M Eagan (ceagan)
Mon, 7 Dec 1998 20:05:59 -0700 (MST)


I understand that it is questionable for a teacher to ask for proceeds
from students art sales, as well as to "make" students participate in the
sale of their student work. the question I have is in regard to the
sale of student work as a means for supporting an art program. A friend
of mine is involved in teaching art to teenagers ata juvenile detention
center. The idea behind the program is to give the kids a sense of self
worth in hopes that when they are released they will see their value not
only as an artist but as a thinking and creative part of society.
My friend is very excited and involved in the program but he runs it on
his own and with very little funding. He volunteers his time and his
supplies. The problem lies in his lack of resources and as the program
comes to a close, the students are left without supplies and any energy
they might have toward art is stifled.
This summer I asked if he could sell their work in order to buy
them their own supplies. Their work was certainly worthy of at least a
gallery
showing. He was denied permission due to their age and their various
dtention center issues.
In this case, had they been interested in showing, would you agree that
they were entitled to a show and the possiblity to sell?
Image what the outcome could be if this program were allowed to thrive.
While I see the importance of the program as it is I can see so much
more coming from it if the detention center were to get involved.
Isn't the possibility of these kids staying out of future detention
centers greater if more time is spent on their futures?

Am I on a soap box or does this make sense?
Chrissy at U of A

On
Mon, 7 Dec
1998, artsednet-digest wrote:

>
> artsednet-digest Monday, December 7 1998 Volume 02 : Number 1107
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> Re: Drawing
> Re: project idea for Diane --Super Snowflakes (K-adult)
> Re: project idea for Diane
> kaleidoscope designs/Screen capture program
> polymer bubbles
> Sky Project
> the value of student art
> Re: the value of student art
> the value of teachers
> Re: the value of teachers
> pin hole camera
> Snowflakes
> Montreal art?
> Re: The ideal multimedia lab
> Beware of contests
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 04:53:23 -0500
> From: lindacharlie <lindacharlie>
> Subject: Re: Drawing
>
> SBrad1 wrote:
> >
> > In a message dated 12/4/98 11:16:24 PM EST, jdp30 writes:
> >
> > >But where do they learn to make white skies with blue
> > > clouds?
> >
> > Or my personal favotite...An inch of blue at the top of the page and an inch
> > of green at the bottom ( That's the grass...This for a junior in HS!)
> > Gabrielle Bradley
>
> You guys just made me think of a lesson I used to do with 3rd graders
> that (thinking back) solved this problem. I called it "What color is the
> sky?" For a little introductory game, I mounted a bunch of calendar
> pictures of beautiful landscape scenes (like Sierra Club stuff), each
> having a sky color OTHER than all blue, onto poster boards. For each of
> these pictures I cut a matching rectangle of white paper, drew in the
> "horizon line" which I interpreted as everything that wasn't sky...so
> included rock formations, waterfalls, tree lines, etc., and colored the
> land portion a solid color, leaving the sky white. In effect they are
> like silhouettes of the landforms. Then I held them up one at a time and
> had the kids figure out which silhouette matched which calendar pic.
> This exercise really made them notice that land-meets-sky. We also
> talked about all the different colored skies and why they weren't blue.
> For the production they did crayon resist landscapes, with
> fore/mid/background and also they had to use more than one crayon color
> in each object or landform, i.e. tree trunks had to have more colors
> than just brown, mountains more than just purple, anything white had to
> be colored white really hard. They were not to put ANYTHING in the sky
> unless it was a night time picture and they wanted moon and stars or
> lightning (after one of the calendar pics). Everything in the picture
> had to be colored hard, hard, hard except water which could be colored
> lightly.
> I showed them my example with a wet-on-wet wash of a sunset (Ooooohhh!
> Aaaahhh!) and explained how the land and water reflect the colors in the
> sky (evident in many of the calendar pics). When they were done
> coloring, I showed them how to do the sunset wash over the entire
> picture with yellow above and below the horizon, then other sky colors
> mirrored in the land/water. It was a very successful lesson, and I don't
> remember being frustrated with that ribbon sky/grass thing after we did
> this.
> I'm also wondering how much of the ribbon sky relates to their own
> experiences of the outdoors. There are so few places anymore where kids
> can actually see a horizon. How many kids get to see a wilderness
> sunrise or sunset? The only time they go outside to play is in nice
> "blue sky" weather. They are surrounded by architecture and the sky is
> "UP." Do kids who live on farms or near the shore do this less than
> urban/suburban kids? How about kids who spend their lives in front of TV
> and video images, or in between soccer/football/dance lessons? How can
> we expect them to understand the visual relationship of sky to land when
> they never lay down on a grassy hill and watch a storm come rolling in?
> Get out the Bierstadts!
> Linda, who will watch this morning's sun rise between the twin towers of
> the nuclear power plant on Michigan's Lake Erie shore.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 05:48:35 -0600
> From: "Lily Kerns" <cwkerns>
> Subject: Re: project idea for Diane --Super Snowflakes (K-adult)
>
> >>maybe you could make paper snowflakes with your students. this would
> satisify
> your need for a project that is simple and elegant, with classroom
> materials.
> all you would need is square white paper, scissors, and maybe some glue and
> glitter for an added touch. ...(snip)... you could point out in this lesson
> the design
> elements of a snowflake and how each one is different and unique,
> >>>
>
> Just be sure your kids know what snowflakes are <G>. I found a difference
> in interest and response between my northern Iowa and southern Missouri
> students....
>
> The traditional approach is to fold the paper and then cut out shapes along
> the edges. But when you stop to think about it, that really doesn't make
> too much sense, does it--to discard all those carefully designed shapes and
> then keep the leftovers......
>
> I developed an different--i.e. backwards-- approach for "super snowflakes"
> which involves planning what you will keep and throwing away the left overs.
> You can tell _every_ time which way a person was thinking when they made the
> design. I have used this approach with 1st and 2nd grades but it works
> best if you have a smaller group at that age because some of them will need
> help getting started with the concept.
>
> These designs can be the starting point for stained glass, color wheels and
> more....There are lots of possible multicultural links. I've also used
> this as a "cooling" summer project....
>
> For more information and detailed instructions, there is a lesson on the
> Missouri Art Education Association page: http://maea.net/LE_flk.html
>
> But don't say I didn't warn you--this is addictive. I ended up making 200 of
> them --all different-- for a bulletin board one time...
>
> Lily
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lily Kerns CWKerns
> Art Teachers-- http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Dell/9575
> Personal-- http://members.tripod.com/~LilyK/
> Quilt guild-- http://www.orion.org/~opqg
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 07:35:37 -0500 (EST)
> From: lr23961
> Subject: Re: project idea for Diane
>
> There's a lot you can do with this snowflake idea, especially with such
> young students. Perhaps you can add to the immediate relevance of such a
> project by supplementing their science learning (ie, teaching briefly
> about the nature of snow, when it falls, why, how it forms, etc. This info
> shouldn't be to hard to come by). Also, you might talk with the kids about
> what snow means to them, or what it makes them think of (do you live in an
> area that gets snow?).
> In addition,Heidi mentions that each snowflake is unique. This is a concept
> you can apply directly to the students. You might ask them some ways that
> they are like snowflakes. This would be a great way to teach about
> diversity (my art ed class did a similar lesson with flowers this
> semester). Also, you might ask the kids to make snowflakes that say
> something about them,personally. These would make beautiful personalized
> gifts, and in the process, the students would learn about snowflakes and
> about themselves as well, not to mention the excercise in motor skills
> and art production.
>
> Laura Romer, Art Education Major, Appalachian State
>
> On Mon, 7 Dec 1998 HyDeJoF wrote:
>
> > In a message dated 98-12-05 18:29:28 EST, owner-artsednet-
> > digest.edu writes:
> >
> > << Sorry this is last minute, but here goes...some of you already know I teach
> > k-2. I'm worried that their ceramic fish, etc. may not come out as good as
> > I hoped, and so I need a backup holiday gift idea for parents' gifts.
> > Nothing ceramic, too late for that. My classes are jumping beans, I think
> > not quite a few are Attention Deficit Disorder, etc. so any ideas must be
> > simple, not pattern stuff, hopefully not with paint, or printing. (except
> > if you have ideas with stamp pads and original type stamping medium.)
> > Simple, elegant,not requiring materials other than standard artroom
> > supplies and easy to wrap. Tall order. Thanks in advance.(I would really
> > prefer not to do holiday art, and stick to a fine arts curriculum, but as a
> > new teacher, I'm still getting my feet wet. maybe next year I will better
> > be able to concretely define and assert my curriculum.) Sincerely, Diane L.
> > >>
> >
> >
> >
> > Diane -
> > maybe you could make paper snowflakes with your students. this would satisify
> > your need for a project that is simple and elegant, with classroom materials.
> > all you would need is square white paper, scissors, and maybe some glue and
> > glitter for an added touch. this would give them a project that goes with the
> > season, but is not really a holiday theme, so you wouldn't run into problems
> > with religious differences. you could point out in this lesson the design
> > elements of a snowflake and how each one is different and unique, and
> > encourage each to be orginal. i assume that you know what a paper snowflake
> > is, but if not, here's a quick explanation: fold the paper in half one way,
> > and then the other to make a square - then cut in various diamond and triangle
> > shapes from all sides - open, glue on glitter, and add a hanger if desired.
> > just an idea (one of my favorites as a kid!) = )
> > Heidi Faith
> > Art Education major - University of Arizona
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 07:26:37 -0600
> From: "Lily Kerns" <cwkerns>
> Subject: kaleidoscope designs/Screen capture program
>
> This Java applet (needs an up to date browser) makes changing kaleidoscopic
> designs
> http://aleph0.clarku.edu/~djoyce/java/Kaleido.html Moving the mouse in and
> out of the circle allows you to see one change at a time.
>
> The effect could be duplicated with students by snipping identical segments
> of (gummed?) paper and gluing them in identical positions in the segments
> of a circle.
>
> In playing with this a minute ago, I tried another program for the first
> time:
> Lotus Screen Cam-- http://www.lotuschannel.com/html/screencam.htm (Window
> 95/98) "Turn your PC into a VCR that records every click, scroll and
> action on your screen." There's a 15 day free demo.
>
> Alt+PrintScreen allows you to capture your screen image and paste it into
> windows Paint or other graphics program, but Screen Cam records screen
> activity and voice, if desired, for play back and allows it to be saved as
> an editable movie file.
>
> Has anyone used this in the art room? Seems to me that if any design,
> painting or computer process can be done or diagramed on a computer, this
> could be a most useful tool when demonstrating on a large screen in a class
> setting. The file could be put on a disk and the steps could be played
> back as many times as needed for self-directed lessons, for home work or
> make up assignments.
>
> Might be worth checking ...
>
> Lily
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lily Kerns CWKerns
> Art Teachers-- http://maea.net
> Personal-- http://members.tripod.com/~LilyK/
> Quilt guild-- http://www.orion.org/~opqg
>
>
>
>
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lily Kerns CWKerns
> Art Teachers-- http://maea.net
> Personal-- http://members.tripod.com/~LilyK/
> Quilt guild-- http://www.orion.org/~opqg
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 08:24:46 EST
> From: Laurann65
> Subject: polymer bubbles
>
> Does anyone know how to get rid of bubbles in polymer so one can have a smooth
> application?
> Thanks!
> :) Laura Allan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 08:24:49 -0500
> From: John & Sandra Barrick <astroboy>
> Subject: Sky Project
>
> Dear Reatha et al,
> Well I for one have seen my fill of white sky's(literally). Whose
> to say the sky is blue. For an alternate why not have them make a
> sky on another planet,i.e. mars. Give them colored paper and colored
> paint, no white. Night sky,day sky,storm sky etc. you could fold the
> paper in forths and have a different sky in each square.Think of
> warhol's silk screens. you could do a project with tints/hues and
> each square could be a different value.
> - --
>
> Sandra Barrick
> astroboy
> http://home.fuse.net/astroboy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 08:55:54 -0500
> From: "joym" <joym>
> Subject: the value of student art
>
> Holy cow! Who said that their art also belongs, at least in part, to the
> teacher that instructs them? I think not! Children own their artwork the
> same as adults. I took a workshop last year with an internationally known
> basketmaker. Was that Nantucket Basket partially his because he caught me?
> No way. And, for the teacher who stuck up for the kid on the $500 price, I
> applaud you! There are a million ways our society undervalues art, talks
> down to children's creations, and views art as only "child's play". If we
> are going to move their views onward & upward, we have to move our own
> views upward first.
>
> Joy
> art therapist/basketmaker
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 19:00:34 -0500
> From: rojul (Rosa Juliusdottir)
> Subject: Re: the value of student art
>
> I was talking about students at the University level not the children. But
> I do still believe that parts of works done by students in painting
> departments for example have some things from the teachers. And there are
> many here at least of the opinion that it is questionable whether students
> should sell their works while still in school. But I would really like to
> hear some more opinions on this.
> Best regards from the far north, Rosa
>
> >Holy cow! Who said that their art also belongs, at least in part, to the
> >teacher that instructs them? I think not! Children own their artwork the
> >same as adults. I took a workshop last year with an internationally known
> >basketmaker. Was that Nantucket Basket partially his because he caught me?
> >No way. And, for the teacher who stuck up for the kid on the $500 price, I
> >applaud you! There are a million ways our society undervalues art, talks
> >down to children's creations, and views art as only "child's play". If we
> >are going to move their views onward & upward, we have to move our own
> >views upward first.
> >
> >Joy
> >art therapist/basketmaker
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 15:40:00 -0500 (EST)
> From: GVMS_TMUSKOP.gov
> Subject: the value of teachers
>
> There is no way that an artist, whether student or professional, should be made
> or even asked to share part of a sales price with an influential person. Yes,
> the teacher definitely has an input into the finished work, but that input does
> not constitute ownership. What about a professional artist who is doing a
> series based upon the works of Van Gogh or Picasso? If he is not copying, but
> merely working "in the manner of" these artists, should he have to pay Van Gogh
> or Picasso's heirs a fee? Should Childe Hassam have paid a commission to
> Claude Monet every time he sold a painting?
>
> Also, if a teacher was worried about giving away "secrets" each time they
> taught a class, how would they teach? The teacher is paid for teaching the
> class, leave it at that.
> Todd
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 21:19:58 -0500
> From: rojul (Rosa Juliusdottir)
> Subject: Re: the value of teachers
>
> Good answer Todd. But I never mentioned that a teacher should share a part
> of a sales price. Merely some of us here believe it is to early to think
> about selling at a time when a student is still studying. It also has
> nothing to do with giving away "secrets". Either I am not making myself
> clear or we art teachers in Iceland have a very different view from our
> American colleagues.
> Rosa
>
> >There is no way that an artist, whether student or professional, should be made
> >or even asked to share part of a sales price with an influential person. Yes,
> >the teacher definitely has an input into the finished work, but that input does
> >not constitute ownership. What about a professional artist who is doing a
> >series based upon the works of Van Gogh or Picasso? If he is not copying, but
> >merely working "in the manner of" these artists, should he have to pay Van Gogh
> >or Picasso's heirs a fee? Should Childe Hassam have paid a commission to
> >Claude Monet every time he sold a painting?
> >
> >Also, if a teacher was worried about giving away "secrets" each time they
> >taught a class, how would they teach? The teacher is paid for teaching the
> >class, leave it at that.
> >Todd
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 13:21:44 PST
> From: "Michelle H. Harrell" <mmhar>
> Subject: pin hole camera
>
> Okay, calling all photography teachers and anyone who knows:
>
> I'm writing lessons for the subs for our photography course which is in
> between teachers until Jan. They have had book work to do until they
> are exhausted and are ready for some hands on. I've found a page in the
> textbook about pin hole cameras. It says to make them from coffee cans
> or Christmas cookie tins. I'd like to find out more about this before
> they begin making them. Does anyone know some good photography websites
> or have any personal experience with pin hole cameras?
>
> I could also use some good in between lessons that will only take a day
> or two. I'm limited on supplies and have no experience with photography
> myself.
>
> Off to a Christmas party in 70+ degree weather- yuck!
> Michelle H. Harrell
> mmhar
> North Garner Middle School
> Garner, North Carolina
>
> Have you answered my assessment survey, yet?
> http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Styx/5366/
>
>
> ______________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 07 Dec 1998 18:00:39 -0400
> From: Ann Weaver <aweaver>
> Subject: Snowflakes
>
> At times I have shown children how to cut paper snowflakes, usually at
> the request of their teachers. When I do, we talk about weather, how
> snowflakes are formed, and have 6 points, about radial symmetry and how
> snowflakes are all different(I know that has been challenged, but I
> don't care - I love telling the kids that they are like snowflakes, all
> different, but all beautiful). When we get around to making them, we use
> math skills to fold in half and then in THIRDS so we get 6 points. I
> know this sounds petty, but I feel that is important to do them as
> acurately as possible and to integrate with other curriculum if we are
> going to do them. It can also be tied into Polish Wyncinanki if you
> want to go that far. How high is the holiday excitement level at other
> schools? Temperatures have hit the 70's here, but kids are full of the
> spirit. ann in nc
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 16:00:59 -0600
> From: "Vicki Bean" <vbean.us>
> Subject: Montreal art?
>
> My family and I plan to visit Montreal over the Xmas holiday for the
> first time.
>
> I'm looking for suggestions on things to see, exhibits, etc.,
>
> Much Thanks. Love this group!
> Vicki Bean Gideon School Dist.
> Art K-12 P.O. Box 227
> Email: vbean.gideon.k12.mo.us Gideon, Missouri 63848
> Phone: 573-448-3471/3447
> Fax: 573-448-5197
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 17:20:32 -0500
> From: hmcelroy (Heidi McElroy)
> Subject: Re: The ideal multimedia lab
>
> Numo, how about an LCD screen and the ability to hook your computer to a tv
> screen...and a laser color printer. Heidi
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 7 Dec 1998 17:13:45 EST
> From: RB7Surf7
> Subject: Beware of contests
>
> >No way. And, for the teacher who stuck up for the kid on the $500 price, I
> >applaud you! There are a million ways our society undervalues art, talks
> >down to children's creations, and views art as only "child's play". If we
> >are going to move their views onward & upward, we have to move our own
> >views upward first.
> I feel the same way about many of the contests offered for children's art. I
> feel it is a sneaky way to exploit children and its an inexpensive way for
> leaches to decorate businesses, offices, banks, schools etc.
> recently I was offered a drunk driving poster contest. I through it in the
> garbage, children do not drink and drive. The contest should be offered to AA
> members.
> RB
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #1107
> ********************************
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