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Lesson Plans


project idea for Diane

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
HyDeJoF
Mon, 7 Dec 1998 00:30:28 EST


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In a message dated 98-12-05 18:29:28 EST, owner-artsednet-
digest.edu writes:

<< Sorry this is last minute, but here goes...some of you already know I teach
k-2. I'm worried that their ceramic fish, etc. may not come out as good as
I hoped, and so I need a backup holiday gift idea for parents' gifts.
Nothing ceramic, too late for that. My classes are jumping beans, I think
not quite a few are Attention Deficit Disorder, etc. so any ideas must be
simple, not pattern stuff, hopefully not with paint, or printing. (except
if you have ideas with stamp pads and original type stamping medium.)
Simple, elegant,not requiring materials other than standard artroom
supplies and easy to wrap. Tall order. Thanks in advance.(I would really
prefer not to do holiday art, and stick to a fine arts curriculum, but as a
new teacher, I'm still getting my feet wet. maybe next year I will better
be able to concretely define and assert my curriculum.) Sincerely, Diane L.
>>

Diane -
maybe you could make paper snowflakes with your students. this would satisify
your need for a project that is simple and elegant, with classroom materials.
all you would need is square white paper, scissors, and maybe some glue and
glitter for an added touch. this would give them a project that goes with the
season, but is not really a holiday theme, so you wouldn't run into problems
with religious differences. you could point out in this lesson the design
elements of a snowflake and how each one is different and unique, and
encourage each to be orginal. i assume that you know what a paper snowflake
is, but if not, here's a quick explanation: fold the paper in half one way,
and then the other to make a square - then cut in various diamond and triangle
shapes from all sides - open, glue on glitter, and add a hanger if desired.
just an idea (one of my favorites as a kid!) = )
Heidi Faith
Art Education major - University of Arizona

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artsednet-digest Saturday, December 5 1998 Volume 02 : Number 1104

This edition includes :
quietness 3-5
Holiday gifts
Re: Drawing
Drawing From Life
computer graphic courses
Re: Wire for K
Re: Drawing
Holiday gifts
Re: Drawing From Life
dried up crayola magic
Re: Drawing
Great Britain, South Africa, Finland Teachers
RE: DBAE
RE: DBAE
Re: Drawing
Re: DBAE
Re: Drawing From Life (long post)
Re: Holiday gifts/ burlap weaving

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 21:52:06 EST
From: SOKERO
Subject: quietness 3-5

Dec. is difficult for quietness. And just how quiet you can get them depends
on the school and the class and your sanity. 1. We want as many positive
words to be used as possible. 2. Radio-CD rule:Classical only. 3. How
tolerant are the teachers in the rooms next to yours. ? I teach inner city
and have 25 years in many situations, so ask questions anytime. There will be
times when you stand back and you can feel those little guys "humming" with
pleasure as they all grasp a concept and do it. I poke my nose out of the
room and flag people to come and look and listen......The same lesson will not
produce those results with another class......

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 04 Dec 1998 22:37:10 -0500
From: "Diane L." <mselle>
Subject: Holiday gifts

Sorry this is last minute, but here goes...some of you already know I teach
k-2. I'm worried that their ceramic fish, etc. may not come out as good as
I hoped, and so I need a backup holiday gift idea for parents' gifts.
Nothing ceramic, too late for that. My classes are jumping beans, I think
not quite a few are Attention Deficit Disorder, etc. so any ideas must be
simple, not pattern stuff, hopefully not with paint, or printing. (except
if you have ideas with stamp pads and original type stamping medium.)
Simple, elegant,not requiring materials other than standard artroom
supplies and easy to wrap. Tall order. Thanks in advance.(I would really
prefer not to do holiday art, and stick to a fine arts curriculum, but as a
new teacher, I'm still getting my feet wet. maybe next year I will better
be able to concretely define and assert my curriculum.) Sincerely, Diane L.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 21:59:09 -0600
From: "Jasmine Preston" <jdp30>
Subject: Re: Drawing

Wendy wrote:

>But where do they learn to make white skies with blue
> clouds?

It takes less effort to color the clouds blue rather than the entire sky?

Jasmine
jdp30

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 22:13:12 -0000
From: dwwebb
Subject: Drawing From Life

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Hello everyone,
I have been having troubles with connecting and answering....I hope =
this gets through because I really need some advise.
I was on leave from school last year and returned to be named =
Department=20
Chair. The person filling in for me while on leave was retained and one =
teacher retired. (3 of us now) High school level.
I teach pottery and sculpture. One other teacher has the Photography =
and 2 fundamentals. The new teacher has the drawing and painting plus 3 =
fundamentals...
The new teacher uses only photos, magazine cut outs, and fantasy =
images, for both the drawing and painting classes. The only medium that =
has been used for the entire first semester is oil and chalk pastels. =
The fundamental classes have been doing fantasy paintings in glow-in =
- -the -dark tempera. Ther has been no exposure to other mediums. The =
Administration seems blind (how suprising). They just see "pretty =
pictures".
College recruitors have come and talked with the students regarding =
what they look for..( life drawing, experience with mediums, creativity =
)..seems to fall on deaf ears.
I am at wits end..No suggestion or kind approach to adjust to the =
level of a student lookin for scholarship..is taken kindly. Did I =
mention this teacher came from 22 years at elementary or middle school? =
How can I stear her in a better direction for the high school student's =
benefit? With out conflict in teaching methods? Is there some concrete =
evidence I can show her that would support drawing from life and =
experience with mediums? Please Help!
Laurie

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Hello everyone,
  I have been having troubles with connecting = and=20 answering....I hope this gets through because I really need some=20 advise.
  I was on leave from school last year and = returned to be=20 named Department
Chair. The person filling in for me while on leave = was=20 retained and one teacher retired. (3 of us now) High school = level.
   I teach pottery and sculpture. One = other teacher=20 has the Photography and 2 fundamentals. The new teacher has the drawing = and=20 painting plus 3 fundamentals...
    The new teacher uses only photos, = magazine=20 cut outs, and fantasy images, for both the drawing and painting classes. = The=20 only medium that has been used for the entire first semester is oil and = chalk=20 pastels. The fundamental classes have been doing fantasy paintings in = glow-in=20 - -the -dark tempera. Ther has been no exposure to other mediums. The=20 Administration seems blind (how suprising). They just see "pretty=20 pictures".
   College recruitors have come and talked = with the=20 students regarding what they look for..( life drawing, experience with = mediums,=20 creativity )..seems to fall on deaf ears.
   I am at wits end..No suggestion or kind = approach=20 to adjust to the level of a student lookin for scholarship..is taken = kindly. Did=20 I mention this teacher came from 22 years at elementary or middle = school? =20 How can I stear her in a better direction for the high school student's = benefit?=20 With out conflict in teaching methods? Is there some concrete evidence I = can=20 show her that would support drawing from life and experience with = mediums?=20 Please Help!
          &nbs= p;            = ;            =              = Laurie
- ------=_NextPart_000_000A_01BE1FD3.486CC140-- ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 03 Dec 1998 18:51:50 -0600 From: George Doros Subject: computer graphic courses Looking ahead to the new millenium I often wonder where Art Education is headed? Will it exist as the present? or is it time to make some changes? We are on the dawn of an exciting future with the advent of computers. Are we ignoring this change or meeting it head on? Are out school programs keeping up with these changes and are we preparing our students with the courses that we teach? I have been asking these and several more questions and have decided to develop a new course at our school involving the use of Art and Computer Graphics. I have received a few responses from some ArtsEdnet particpants from another e-mail request, but still need some more concrete material. Are there any teachers out there that may have developed a course in Computer Graphics and have examples of units or course outlines for a course of this nature. Better yet are there any schools in your area that are using courses of this courses of this nature that would be willing to share their experiences. ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 5 Dec 1998 06:48:09 EST From: Juncture Subject: Re: Wire for K Subject: Wire for Kindergarten Does anyone have any ideas for using the Twisteez kind of thin colored wire with kindergarteners? I'm looking for other possibilities that will get them to realize that wire can make shapes in space with line -- Thanks for any help you can offer! Liz in rural NY 1st of all wire of this sort is Telephone wire & should be free from your local Ma Bell. I approached Ma a few yrs ago with examples of what could be created w/ it - like animals, jewelry etc & got light & medium guage copper & Aluminum Tel wire. The best approach would be to have them wrap wire around pencils for coils & make slinky critters with them. (You can also wrap it around square or triangilar wood pieces & stretch it out - K teachers have all sorts of blocks & shapes Kids could trace their wire around) You could staple finished pieces to tag or poster board. You can use it in conjunction w/ construction paper or felt. I f you have examples to show & some pictures of the Calder's Circus menagerie (Should be available on the Internet) - try: National Gallery of Art-Calder Exhibition they will want to make animals & serious Sculpture. Good Luck with it Liz, Bill ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 08:00:31 -0500 From: lindacharlie Subject: Re: Drawing Jasmine Preston wrote: > > Wendy wrote: > > >But where do they learn to make white skies with blue > > clouds? > > It takes less effort to color the clouds blue rather than the entire sky? > That's what I think. My kids who love to create don't do this as much as the "is this good enough" and "am I done yet" factions. Linda in warm and rainy Michigan ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 10:17:06 -0500 From: "Diane L." Subject: Holiday gifts Thank you all for your wonderful responses to my request for holiday gift ideas. I know how busy you all are, and so what you did was extra special! Sincerely, Diane L. ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 07:13:49 -0800 From: Maggie White Subject: Re: Drawing From Life dwwebb wrote: > > The new teacher uses only photos, magazine cut outs, and fantasy > images, for both the drawing and painting classes. The only medium > that has been used for the entire first semester is oil and chalk > pastels. The fundamental classes have been doing fantasy paintings in > glow-in -the -dark tempera. There has been no exposure to other > mediums. > College recruiters have come and talked with the students regarding > what they look for..( life drawing, experience with mediums, > creativity )..seems to fall on deaf ears. > How can I steer her in a better direction for the high school > student's benefit? Is there > some concrete evidence I can show her that would support drawing from > life and experience with mediums? Laurie, As department chair you may have to become assertive and let her know the expectations for HS work. Your state department of education probably has some standards you can show her. If not, check the portfolio requirements from a number of art schools to show her what they expect. It doesn't matter that few _will_ go on to college; their requirements are pretty minimal and are indicative what the students should have been at least exposed to, if not completely mastered. Touchy situation! Since she's new, though, it may be easier to deal with than if she were a veteran at your school. Good luck. Let us know how things work out. Maggie ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 5 Dec 1998 11:00:20 EST From: MALOSHD Subject: dried up crayola magic Hey Fellow Artsednetters--------------------------> Sorry I have been very silent for a while. I have been working two jobs (performing and teaching) and preparing for a move. Soon I hope to be back in the circle of discussion. You all have helped me so much on different occasions. Anyway, I got this donation of Crayola Model Magic. Its partially dry, kind of spongy, but not malleable. I have been hanging on to it in hopes that I will discover a wonderful new use. I hate to throw it out. Has anyone creative uses for this stuff? Is there a trick to refurbishing it? Wishing everyone well, Dawn in Tucson ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 08:06:08 PST From: "Sharon Hause" Subject: Re: Drawing It's the "suns in the corner" that is my pet pieve! >Reply-To: >From: "Jasmine Preston" >To: "artsednet" >Subject: Re: Drawing >Date: Fri, 4 Dec 1998 21:59:09 -0600 > >Wendy wrote: > >>But where do they learn to make white skies with blue >> clouds? > >It takes less effort to color the clouds blue rather than the entire sky? > >Jasmine >jdp30 ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 5 Dec 1998 11:06:18 EST From: MALOSHD Subject: Great Britain, South Africa, Finland Teachers Hey Artsednetters---------------------------> I am presently a candidate for the Fulbright Teacher Exchange Program. I may be placed in Great Britain, South Africa, or Finland, depending on where they find my exchange partner. Are there any art teachers on Artsednet from these countries? I would like to ask lots of questions in order to prepare myself for this potential exchange. Wishing everyone well, Dawn in Tucson ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 08:34:48 PST From: "Sharon Hause" Subject: RE: DBAE With all the conversation on DBAE, I would like to find more information on the topic since I never been trained or educated on the subject. Anyone know if it can be found online? This is all new to me. ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 08:52:44 PST From: "Sharon Hause" Subject: RE: DBAE I located a good site on DBAE on ArsEdNet. Guess I was surprised to see the same thing I base my curriculum on only with a fancy name. To me the idea of taking all the parts of DBAE to make a whole is much like the compostion of piece: it all has to fit together to make significant form. Sharon ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 5 Dec 1998 13:08:02 EST From: RWilk85411 Subject: Re: Drawing jAmen to the suns in the corner. In middle school it was the sky that was blue only part of the way down. There was this big band of white between the earth and the sky. When I asked them what that was, I got, " I don't know." When I asked them to point it out to me in the real outside world, they became confused. I don't recall seeing this phenomenon in high school. But the @#**##! sun persists in being a problem. Reatha ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 05 Dec 1998 15:29:10 -0500 From: John & Sandra Barrick Subject: Re: DBAE Silly, you are part of the list and don't know where it is??? It's on the getty web. http://www.artsednet.getty.edu Would you like some easy guidelines for writing up a lesson plan with DBAE? S Sharon Hause wrote: > > With all the conversation on DBAE, I would like to find more information > on the topic since I never been trained or educated on the subject. > Anyone know if it can be found online? This is all new to me. Sandra Barrick astroboy http://home.fuse.net/astroboy ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 5 Dec 1998 16:27:51 EST From: Jennings51 Subject: Re: Drawing From Life (long post) Laurie, As long time dept. chair for 2 high schools and 3 middle schools, I (and my school and county) see my dept chair role as setting standards, expectations, and a vision for the art programs, then helping my teachers buy into the vision and gain the skills to meet expected standards. It is also the dept. chair's job to see that the county's art curriculum is taught consistently across all schools. You are the department chair, insist that the teacher begin to include units which use observational drawing (from life), art history, aesthetics and art criticism. If you anticipate resistance, talk with your administration first to get their support. Help the teacher make the transition by giving suggestions of how to transfer a couple of her/his current units to a drawing from life basis and perhaps even bring her/him the materials to do it with -- for example a wonderful grouping of still life objects, and an outline of the new lesson plan and a unit on drawing the human figure from life - gesture series then longer 15 minute drawings etc. then a culminating asignment using student's gesture drawings -- maybe a grouping of them in the teacher's favorite, pastel? Expect it to be a continous process and don't expect the teacher to change all at once. Maybe the teacher hesitates to change because he/she doesn't have time to replan her lessons, maybe it's fear of taking the risk, or maybe it's just because he/she doesn't know how to do it differently. Your role as dept. chair probably should include setting standards and expectations for instruction within your dept. and helping your teachers gain the skills to meet those standards. If you aren't clear on your administration's expectations for the dept. chair role, you may want to clarify their vision of the role before approaching the teacher. Another factor is curriculum. Do you have a written curriculum for drawing classes which includes drawing from life, art history, aesthetics, art criticism and any additional school system expectations? If so, the teacher should be meeting the expectations set forth in the curriculum. If not, that could be part of the answer to your problem; write a curriculum that adheres to National and State arts standards and county/school expectations, then expect your teachers to teach the curriculum. A well written curriculum will guide what students should leave the course knowing , but still give teachers freedom in selecting instructional methods to teach the curriculum. In our school system we say that currriculum is tightly held (we must teach it) but instructional methodology is loosely held (teachers great freedom in how they teach the curriculum). Denise ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 5 Dec 1998 18:23:16 EST From: Laurann65 Subject: Re: Holiday gifts/ burlap weaving Hello. With my 3rd graders I do a burlap weaving -- and it becomes a "decorative hanging"... I cut different colors of burlap into rectangles -- about 6 x 9 - it is not an exact measurement. I have yarn and yarn needles. It takes at least two periods to finish. First we make an envelope to keep the pieces in between classes. We discuss warp & weft then they pick out their burlap. We fringe it and trim it. Then every inch or so they pinch and pull out a weft string. They choose different colors of yarn and then weave them in the spaces created. We talk about pattern, so when they weave it might be "over two, under three" ... or whatever they choose - It doesn't have to be "over one, under one" ... those who finish that and want to can add zigzag lines in- between the parallel weft lines they have already added. I cut strips of corrugated cardboard -- about 1"x6" ... each child gets 2. When they are finished weaving they put a line of white glue along each edge of the back side, and then the cardboard strips on the top and bottom. A piece of yarn can be threaded through the corrugation of the top for a "hanger"...... a picture is worth a thousand words! Hope you can visualize this. The kids love this. It is amazing how many kids don't know what burlap is. Most of my kids are bilingual so I tend to scale projects down. 2nd graders who speak the same language as you could probably do this. I think it is an excellent exposure to the elements of weaving, and everyone is successful. :) Laura Allan In a message dated 12/4/98 9:40:16 PM Central Standard Time, mselle writes: << Sorry this is last minute, but here goes...some of you already know I teach k-2. I'm worried that their ceramic fish, etc., may not come out as good as I hoped, and so I need a backup holiday gift idea for parents' gifts. Nothing ceramic, too late for that. My classes are jumping beans, I think not quite a few are Attention Deficit Disorder, etc., so any ideas must be simple, not pattern stuff, hopefully not with paint, or printing. (except if you have ideas with stamp pads and original type stamping medium). Simple, elegant, not requiring materials other than standard artem supplies and easy to wrap. Tall order. Thanks in advance.(I would really prefer not to do holiday art, and stick to a fine arts curriculum, but as a new teacher, I'm still getting my feet wet. maybe next year I will better be able to concretely define and assert my curriculum.) Sincerely, Diane L. >> ------------------------------ End of artsednet-digest V2 #1104 ******************************** To post to the ArtsEdNet Talk Listserve, send e-mail to: artsednet *To unsubscribe from the listserv, send e-mail to: artsednet-request and type in the message area only: UNSUBSCRIBE *To send a message to the List-Owner, send e-mail to: artsednet *ArtsEdNet web site: http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/ --part0_913008630_boundary--

  • Reply: lr23961: "Re: project idea for Diane"