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Lesson Plans


Re: value of kids' artwork.

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
R.E.William Loring (bcloring)
Sun, 6 Dec 1998 10:00:00 -0800


The two high schools inour district have permanent students art collections,
also.
A group of teachers and administrators choose a piece or two and we purchase
them for the school....the kids love being part of our permanent collection.
I think this is a really common practice.
-----Original Message-----
From: lindacharlie <lindacharlie>
To: wendy sauls <wsauls>
Cc: artsednet.edu <artsednet.edu>
Date: Sunday, December 06, 1998 9:06 AM
Subject: Re: value of kids' artwork.

>wendy sauls wrote:
>
>>
>> does anyone know of a gallery or museum that contains children's art
only,
>> or mostly? i am speaking of a permanent setup that displays and/or sells
>> kids art "seriously" like adults, professionally framed/matted, the whole
>> nine yards. is there a place that sells/markets kids' art?
>
>I read about one several years ago, perhaps in Smithsonian mag...think
>it's in CA.
>
>>
>> does anybody ever fall in love with a kids work and want to make
>> reproductions of it to display at school or in their home? do you ask
>> permission? keep the original? compensate the artist?
>
>Every year my principal and I get together and choose up to 7 (one per
>grade) student art works we think are special and offer to mat and frame
>them and hang them in the school "art gallery." The students get a
>letter asking them and their parents for permission to keep the works
>for our "permanent collection." Most of them agree. I make a color copy
>of the art work for them along with a letter of appreciation for their
>contribution. The school hallways are the gallery walls. Last year a dad
>made wooden "art gallery" signs to suspend from the ceilings at the
>entrance to each hallway. This has been a tradition for at least 10
>years, and before I came to this building. This practice says a lot
>about the importance of art to the students and others who visit our
>building (like administrtors and school board members). Four years ago
>when I announced to my ninth grade social studies students that I would
>be leaving to teach elementary art, one of them told me to look for her
>picture in the Cleveland Art Gallery. It had been there since she was in
>the 2nd grade and she was still very proud of that accomplishment.
>Linda in Michigan