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Lesson Plans


Re: Substitute Teaching

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Fran Marze (fmaiu+@pitt.edu)
Thu, 4 Dec 1997 20:36:38 -0500 (EST)

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Be yourself and always have back up plans. it has been over 20 years since
i was a substitute, but always kept a briefcase,e tc. with plans to use a
t a moment's notice. I had some interesting times, but keeping a sense of
humor and the familiar broken record school of what should be done. Don;t
try to be someone else, but be firm and helpful. I always remembered the
time I went into a ninth grade art class as a substitute and heard a kid
say, "it's ok, we got the one who can draw!" Just remember that--you know
more than those 7,8,9, etc. students!
Find out what the norm of behavior is; usually say no to requests like,
can I go...? Usually principals don't like referrals for discipline.Keep
good control over supplies, esp. exacto knives, etc. Count those things.
The classroom teacher will bless you. Good luck

On Thu, 4 Dec 1997, MichaelDelahunt wrote:

> <bold>Robben1713,Internet writes:
>
> </bold><x-quoted>I am currently getting my art cerification and I have recently started
>
> substitute teaching. I enjoy substitute teaching and do it in the high
>
> school and junior high levels, but I have some problems. I am only 22 years
>
> old and look like I am still in high school mys</x-quoted>el<x-quoted>f. Teachers who don't know
>
> me ask me for my hall pass. I try to dress up more and that seems to help
>
> but not always. Also, I don't know how to make the students take what I am
>
> saying seriously. I was wondering if anyone could give me some pointers on
>
> how to maintain order in the classroom.
>
> Jessica
>
> Scotch Plains, NJ</x-quoted>
>
>
> Jessica,
>
> Find out from faculty what they do (and what they expect administrators to do)-- what system of rewards and other consequences they employ. Find out what standards they recommend for the control of noise, attention, movement, etc.-- what behaviors they find they need to encourage, discourage, and accept, and how. Practise using a "teacher" voice, and holding your ground without flinching, while at the same time being generous with your praises and gentle humor. It's crucial to have some systems and to be consistent in using them. Nevertheless, what you will find effective will come from the ways your students "read" you-- what you represent, your expectations, the qualities of your interests in students, in life, in art, and in teaching art to your students.
>
>
> Everyone in our profession has had rough moments, days, and years, Jessica.
>
> We need LOTS more great art teachers all across this country.
>
> Keep your eyes on your goals, your ideals.
>
> If you're good, people will find out, you'll get a job, you'll love what you do, and many will appreciate what you work so hard doing.
>
> Good luck!
>
>
> Michael Delahunt
>
> Sonoran Sky, Scottsdale, AZ
>
> ArtLex - a dictionary of visual art is at http://www.aristotle.com/sskystorage/Art/ArtLex.html
>
> This message sent using the FirstClass SMTP/NNTP Gateway for Mac OS.
>
>


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