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RE: [teacherartexchange] digital photo

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From: San D Hasselman (shasselman_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Dec 28 2012 - 07:07:20 PST


When I taught, I required all of my advanced students to write thesis statements about their intentions and then show me how they got their final work, using their original statements as a guide. If you go to a professional gallery of a particular photographer's work, you will see that they have their thesis statements or "artist's statement" on the wall of the gallery and all of their work reflects their intention. When I taught photography way back in the day, I did NOT grade based on the final photograph, but on the whole package, which included their original statements and all of the photographs that were associated with that statement. They were also required to write about their work and how their work "proved" their statements. So for your advanced students if they are working on a portfolio of images, how are they tied to their original intent (which by the way is "declared" publically in front of the whole class so that everyone critiques each other's work based on what your intention is).

Also, if you don't want to go the route about, you should still have your students write about HOW they made their final image. i.e. what processes did they use on Photoshop, where was it taken, what were the lighting conditions, that sort of thing.

And
 most importantly we need to teach kids about the word STEALING. But in order to do that we have to, as art educators emphasize that even taking an image that is not yours and drawing it, is also a form of stealing someone's image and idea. Too often as art educators we let kids "copy" images to draw faces for example. My students heard me say over and over again " When did Bob Marley (Bob Dylan, you insert name here) come to your house and pose for you?" I am not opposed to referencing from photos, because afterall we don't have our own private elephant in our backyard to draw from, but I pushed my students to make a "frankenelephant", or a composite of 3 or more photos of an elephant, when a real elephant wasn't available from them to draw from.

San D
 
>
> Right - but I'm looking beyond the initial assignemnts into the more
> advanced level work when you don't always get a full view of where the
> photos came from. Any other tips?
>
> On Fri, Dec 28, 2012 at 8:34 AM, San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Like all work done in school, the final product should NOT be the end all and be all, but it is the process that is important. So, in designing your course you must first have certain "gates" the students pass through before they turn in the final image. For example they must be able to understand and show the use of the elements and principles of design in various steps through different photo shoots. So it would be harder for them to steal images if you require a sequencing of images or "bracketing", as usually stolen images are "one ups".
> >
> > San D
> >
> >>
> >> Next year I'm switching my photo curriculum from darkroom to digital.
> >> How do digital photo teachers know your students actually took the
> >> photos they turn in for projects? With all the online image
> >> resources out there, how will I be able to determine what is actually
> >> my students' work?
> >>
> >> ---
> > ---
> >
>
>
>
>

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