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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: December 20, 2011

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From: Pesoat, Lynn-NBCT (lynn.pesoat_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Dec 21 2011 - 07:46:47 PST


One thing that I do at the high school level that saves a lot on cleanup is to set up each student with a styrofoam plate with the primary colors and black and white acrylic paint on one and a second as the mixing palette. It is placed up-side down over the other and slides into a large ziplock bag with the students name and number that I have assigned. These go into pickle buckets from the cafeteria (or garden buckets I have found on sale) that have the class written around the top. The buckets slide under a table for storage. The brushes have tape and numbers low and high on the handles and go into a numbered holder with the bristles up. I do have the students wash those in our small room that does have three small sinks. I usually paint with no more than two to three classes at a time and since classes will follow up others and use the same brushes, the students will let me know if there was paint left in them to mark off on the previous students score (plus I admonish them and see that they clean-up better next time.) Since the bristles are up-I can also check easily before lunch or at the end of the day. I have my paint in 1/2 gallons and use pumps. As the students run out of a color I (only) refill the color. If a student mixes up a large amt of a color on the mixing plate/palette that might drip when place upside down, then I give them a third plate which can cover the primary plate and the other can face up and still fit into the ziplock with it pulled tight. I have to remind students that the palettes have to sit level in the bucket so that the paint does not run.If a student get a lot of paint on the inside of a bag , it can be turned inside-out and be washed, dried, and turned back. When we finish a painting unit then the palettes get thrown out. It has worked for years. I used to use the other palettes with the little wells but had the same nightmare clean-up problem. I get the quantity Styrofoam plates and ziploc bags at Wallyworld pretty cheap.
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From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest [teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2011 2:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: December 20, 2011

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, December 20, 2011.

1. clean up
2. RE: clean up
3. Re: clean up
4. RE: clean up
5. Re: clean up
6. Re: clean up
7. RE: clean up
8. clean up

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Subject: clean up
From: Chantal Pinnow <chantalpinnow@hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2011 13:49:21 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

Does anyone have a good clean up plan? My biggest issue is with 6th and 7th grade and the state they leave my sink and paint brushes in. My classroom sink is right outside my classroom, so it is hard to monitor both what is happening outside at the sink and in the room. It never fails, someone (no one will own up to it) leaves a pile of unclean pallettes and ruined paintbrushes in the sink. I have tried limiting the sink to two at a time, but then we get a long line of people waiting and clean up takes forever and there is still a mess. Any thing that has worked for others?
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Subject: RE: clean up
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2011 15:11:46 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2

I have two clean up methods for brushes and palettes that worked for me over the years. The first one is quite simple. I got plastic buckets and filled them up with water. I placed one at each corner of the room (too disperse the crowd more than anything). The kid dropped their brushes in the buckets that were marked brushes and dropped their palettes in the buckets marked palettes. Then at the end of the the class I cleaned up all of the brushes and palettes that had presoaked. It took less than 10 minutes, and I would then stack the brushes and palettes out for the next crew. Of course I taught high school and didn't have the same classes back to back, and I also had the sink in my room. That said, my sink was so small it could only accomodate 2 kids at a time anyway so I had to devise a method to get everything done quickly.

My second method was to have a chart that had various tasks on it, and the kids were rotated through the clean up tasks and got a grade for cleaning (participation grade for want of a different term that you could justify). So there would be two kids assigned for brushes, two for pallettes, two for tables, two for putting work in the drying rack, two for making sure nothing was on the floor, two to take out the garbage, etc, etc, and these tasks were rotated weekly. This method became cumbersome for me, as I am not by nature someone who assigns clean up, I would prefer that kids take responsibility on their own, and found this, while it worked, another task for ME to do, and quite frankly it was a lot quicker and easier for me to just clean up the brushes and palettes. However, that said, if you can keep up with the list idea it is very successful, and kids stop complaining immediately when they understand it is rotated.

Just to add to the discussion on cleaning, my end of the year clean up went very well for 35 years. What I would do is take all the jobs imagineable in the art room including organizing closets, stacking paper, collecting pencils, etc, and put each on a small slip of paper (think fortune cookie). Then as students would walk into the classroom the last day of regular class, they would find me at the door on a chair with a hat filled with these slips of paper. They would pull their "task" out of the hat, and would spend the whole class period doing that task. They loved the 'luck of the draw' aspect, and by the end of the day with all 5 classes, my room was as clean as a whistle, and organized to boot. Again their was a grade involved, because they had to hand the little slip of paper back with their signature on the back of it indicating they did their task. This grade ultimately boosted their exam grade, and so they were eager to have the extra points.

San D
>
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Subject: Re: clean up
From: Gina Arena <ginaarena@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2011 10:15:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

How about rotating cleanup through each student. Have students put used brushes and palettes in a bucket of water. Assign however many kids to wash all of the materials at the end of class. If you rotate thru your attendance list, everyone does it and you know who was responsible for that days cleanup.

Gina Arena

>
> Does anyone have a good clean up plan? My biggest issue is with 6th and 7th grade and the state they leave my sink and paint brushes in. My classroom sink is right outside my classroom, so it is hard to monitor both what is happening outside at the sink and in the room. It never fails, someone (no one will own up to it) leaves a pile of unclean pallettes and ruined paintbrushes in the sink. I have tried limiting the sink to two at a time, but then we get a long line of people waiting and clean up takes forever and there is still a mess. Any thing that has worked for others?
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

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Subject: RE: clean up
From: "Pokojski, Kelly" <Kelly-Pokojski@cdolinc.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2011 11:30:56 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

I just have them do the cups and put the brushes in a bucket (dry or not
depending on the medium), if I don't the brushes are ruined, also I have
been known to assign two students to brush duty, I only have a sink, no
counter, big talbes and not much space, having any class all trying to
clean ups is so impractical.

-----Original Message-----
From: Chantal Pinnow [mailto:chantalpinnow@hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, December 20, 2011 7:49 AM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] clean up

Does anyone have a good clean up plan? My biggest issue is with 6th and
7th grade and the state they leave my sink and paint brushes in. My
classroom sink is right outside my classroom, so it is hard to monitor
both what is happening outside at the sink and in the room. It never
fails, someone (no one will own up to it) leaves a pile of unclean
pallettes and ruined paintbrushes in the sink. I have tried limiting the
sink to two at a time, but then we get a long line of people waiting and
clean up takes forever and there is still a mess. Any thing that has
worked for others?

---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
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Subject: Re: clean up
From: "Kang, Jenna [WR]" <JKang@srvusd.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2011 11:04:33 -0800
X-Message-Number: 5
Hello,
My students sit by tables. Five out of eight tables have extra clean up duty when we do messy projects, like sink 1, 2, 3, floor by sinks, and counters. I have them bring me clean brushes back. Each table has two palettes (approx. 9"x12") with their table number on the back, so I know who didn't clean up if it's left dirty. either they lose points, stay late to clean up, or come back to finish cleaning. This system works pretty well.
Jenna
6th thru 8th grade
Sent from my iPad
On Dec 20, 2011, at 5:50 AM, "Chantal Pinnow" <chantalpinnow@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> Does anyone have a good clean up plan? My biggest issue is with 6th and 7th grade and the state they leave my sink and paint brushes in. My classroom sink is right outside my classroom, so it is hard to monitor both what is happening outside at the sink and in the room. It never fails, someone (no one will own up to it) leaves a pile of unclean pallettes and ruined paintbrushes in the sink. I have tried limiting the sink to two at a time, but then we get a long line of people waiting and clean up takes forever and there is still a mess. Any thing that has worked for others?
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
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Subject: Re: clean up
From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2011 15:03:40 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6
Could a mirror be strategically mounted so you can observe the sink activity? Could video surveillance observe the sink so you could identify irresponsible students? Could student teams be asked to sign up on a rotating basis to be responsible to watch other students and require compliance, or else clean it up themselves?
Marvin
On Dec 20, 2011, at 8:49 AM, Chantal Pinnow wrote:
>
> Does anyone have a good clean up plan? My biggest issue is with 6th and 7th grade and the state they leave my sink and paint brushes in. My classroom sink is right outside my classroom, so it is hard to monitor both what is happening outside at the sink and in the room. It never fails, someone (no one will own up to it) leaves a pile of unclean pallettes and ruined paintbrushes in the sink. I have tried limiting the sink to two at a time, but then we get a long line of people waiting and clean up takes forever and there is still a mess. Any thing that has worked for others?
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
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Subject: RE: clean up
From: "Alice Matthews Gentili" <amgentili@charter.net>
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2011 19:07:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7
In my room, clean up time takes 10 minutes for 30 stduents. My classes meet
back-to-back with no time in between for clean up, so the materials must be
made ready by the first group for the next group. Students sit at 2 very
large tables (each made of 4 tables). To start a painting task, I ask one
half of the large table to get paint, palette, cup, brushes. When the first
half is all set, the next half of the table goes. By now you're thinking,
"But I asked about clean up not set up". It is important because 10 minutes
before class is over, I ask that first group to clean up and send the groups
up in the same order, which the kids understand and can anticipate getting
themselves to a good stopping place.
The first time my youngest student paint, I am all over them with clean up.
I legitimately scrutinize every palette, brush, and cup that is returned to
the work center - clean and dry. If the materials aren't clean enough, the
students are sent back to do a better job. This works VERY WELL. It is
important to summon patience and not rush through this because it is very
important groundwork. After this first time, there are very few problems.
In your situation with the sink outside the room, I imagine you have one
foot in the hall and the other in the classroom. Your supply table should be
positioned just inside your room so you can see the supplies being returned.
If this is not possible, do a visual inspection as they pass by you..."the
password is clean" type of thing. It is obvious that many of my 7th and 8th
grade students have never cleaned a thing in their lives, so now I guess I
teach that, too!
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Subject: clean up
From: Barbara Marder <marder621@rcn.com>
Date: Tue, 20 Dec 2011 22:40:03 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8
I have a tight schedule and do not allow pile-uip at the sink. I also watch
anything breathing at all times.
I use a plastic beach pail filled 1/3 way with water and have all dirty
brushes dropped in that.
I use disposable paletts or large paint cakes that I have on plastic trays
I got from bargain store.
These trays get stacked up on a rolling cart near me and I wheel it out of
the way.
I rarely allow anyone at my sink-hand-washing can take place in the school
lav
I appoint TWO students to wash brushes or do it myself at the end of the
day and put them to dry upside down in a new beach bucket.
This has worked evry well for years.
I do not wash acrylic paints down the drain-cannot be good for water supply.
I use plastic scraps (lucite) that i got from a nearby company-when the
paint piles up heavily, we use these painted palettes to create something
abstract.
Barbara from Boston
On Dec 20, 2011, at 8:49 AM, Chantal Pinnow wrote:
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END OF DIGEST
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