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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: December 11, 2010

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From: Susan Davis (smd1133_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Dec 12 2010 - 04:26:09 PST


This is becoming more common all in many districts. I am assigned to 2nd
grade for a daily 40 minute enrichment time as well as supporting the
teacher working with kids at risk in reading. Art class cut 10 minutes this
year to 50 min...ends up to be 40 minutes. No planning on one day when I
have over 100 students! Meetings (one was for differentiation in Math
believe it or not!), AND I have two duties per day, classroom teachers have
two per week. So for sanity's sake, I must look at the good and am thankful
for a job these days. My daughter is working at Nordstrom's because she
hasn't found a teaching job. 300 lay-offs in her city.

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Sunday, December 12, 2010 1:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: December 11, 2010

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, December 11, 2010.

1. Re: 50-minute periods?
2. Advice needed: Glazes
3. RE: Advice needed: Glazes
4. RE: teacherartexchange digest: December 08, 2010
5. Re: teaching 2 point perspective- advice needed
6. shuffled grid drawings
7. Re: Advice needed: Glazes
8. yz1mzdik 2zul mt
9. Re: 50-minute periods?
10. Re: 50-minute periods?
11. Re: shuffled grid drawings
12. RE: 50-minute periods?
13. RE: 50-minute periods?

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Subject: Re: 50-minute periods?
From: "allgaul" <allgaul@comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 07:27:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

We used to have 50 minutes in elementary as well. Then they did the same to
us as they did to you- "45" minutes....and they didn't account for any time
between classes to clean up or set up, or travel time. IF teachers get to
the room on time and IF teachers get there to pick up on time and IF....you
are living it, I don't have to tell you! Doing that eliminated 2 elementary
art teacher jobs in elementary and my friend and I were lucky enough to get
reassigned to the same middle school where now we teach 55 minute classes,
they get art in a rotation of 5 exploratory special subjects and it adds up
to about 17-18 class periods. The middle school had such BAD art for so long

they made a new position and the kids get 2 art rotations! I teach 3-D and
have a clay studio set up and my friend teaches the 2-D projects. Working
out great and it is like being at the country club compared to the horrible
schedule and run around that my friends in elementary are putting up with.
They can't get anything done because the period suddenly becomes 35 minutes
because of the above-mentioned situations. AND they are plugging the art
teachers in to things like outside playground duty....teaching a
'enrichment' period (one friend had to teach Shakespeare to 2nd graders
believe it or not).
Nightmare.
 I consider myself very lucky to have escaped that new schedule where they
are referred to as 'encore' teacher. Makes no sense!

Good luck

Cathy in NJ

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Subject: Advice needed: Glazes
From: "KulasFamily" <makul9@gra.midco.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 06:39:42 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

Anyone have advice for a new hs art teacher on glazes for her (low fire)
ceramics unit? She inherited about 9 pints of Gare underglazes. I suggested

just adding a clear glaze and giving the students the option of gloss/glazed

and unglazed surfaces ( for her first year of teaching). Any additions that
she should add?
Thanks in advance for the help!!
Mary in MN

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Advice needed: Glazes
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 12:58:49 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

I am assuming she can not order new glazes and must use what she has. First
off she should make test tiles with the glazes so SHE can see what they look
like as well as her students. The tiles should be examples of the glazes
gloss/matt. I am not a math major but there are many permeations of how many
test glazes she could get by brushing one color over the other, or more than
one, etc, etc, etc.
 
Next she should teach students about pouring and splattering, scraffitto,
using different color clay bases, masking off different areas (I used
masking tape then carefully pulled off the masking tape right before
firing). You can also NOT glaze the surfaces, but paint with regular
paints, do a decoupage technique with other materials, spray paint, etc. The
alternative useages should be on pieces that will NOT be used for food or
drink (i.e. functional boxes, things with drawers, sculptural objects).
 
Just a word about scraffitto. I have seen some interesting pieces using this
technique where you incise a design in the leather hard clay, bisque fire
the work, then paint the glaze over the desing, then steel wool the glaze
off the pot, but leave it in the crevices of the scraffito. Doesn't take
much glaze, and it looks terrific when fired again.
 
Also another thing that looks terrific is if you fire your pot in one color,
ie white, and when you take it out of the kiln you take it over to the sink
while it is still pinging (and you wear gloves) and make sure you wear
safety glasses too, you run the warm pot under cold water. This will crack
the glaze all over the pot. You then put the pot aside until it is cool. You
then work in small areas by putting black ink on a rag and putting it over
the pot, making sure that you don't keep it on permanently on the glaze, but
rub it into the cracks. You get a crackle effect on your pot. This is a
technique not used for pots meant for food or drink.
 
San D
 
 

> From: makul9@gra.midco.net
> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Advice needed: Glazes
> Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 06:39:42 -0600
>
> Anyone have advice for a new hs art teacher on glazes for her (low fire)
> ceramics unit? She inherited about 9 pints of Gare underglazes. I
suggested
> just adding a clear glaze and giving the students the option of
gloss/glazed
> and unglazed surfaces ( for her first year of teaching). Any additions
that
> she should add?
> Thanks in advance for the help!!
> Mary in MN
>
>
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: December 08, 2010
From: Robin Phillips <rphillips@mvsd.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 08:03:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I have 40 minutes with Pre-K through 6th grade.

Robin in PA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teaching 2 point perspective- advice needed
From: <mwhite139@cox.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 9:58:14 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Longtime member (note that I did not say ¨old!¨) Bunki Kramer has a really
fun lesson that makes use of perspective. The students learn to draw boxes
in space, then they insert a ribbon or snake or worm or dragon slithering in
and out of holes in the boxes. It´s just the kind of goofy, nonthreatening
assignment a MS student would enjoy, and I also used it with my HS students
to incorporate both perspective drawing and the use of values to create
depth. She used to have a Web site from Los Cerros Middle School, but our
school server is too slow for me to search for it. The lesson may also be
on Incredible Art Dept.

Maggie

---- sarah k <sarah.kerns3@gmail.com> wrote:
> In your experiences, what has been the most successful approach to
> teaching 2 point perspective?
>
> I consider myself a novice teacher, after two years part time, this is
> my first year "full time" (24hrs a week). I am teaching my eighth
> graders perspective, many of them having little art experience, and
> even though most of them are doing, well after a 1 point perspective
> refresher and brief 2 point intro (I gave a handout with step by step
> directions and walked through), I feel I am loosing some.
>
> The assignment is to create a cityscape... now, in the future, along
> the beach, whatever they can imagine. I want them to be jazzed! But I
> think its a combination of lack of effort and creativity of the behalf
> of students and poor teaching techniques from me. How would you
> improve this situation?
>
> Thank you as always!
>
> Sarah K.
> Quincy Catholic Academy
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: shuffled grid drawings
From: Tina Vercelli <tvercelli@ardmore.k12.ok.us>
Date: Thu, 09 Dec 2010 09:26:07 -0600
X-Message-Number: 6

I have discovered that my middle school students LOVE the grid drawings
where the squares are all jumbled up and they have to draw them in the right
order. (I'm not even sure what they are called.) They say they like it
better than the traditional grid drawing. I have found a few online, but
I'm wondering if anyone knows of a book that has several of them available?

  

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Advice needed: Glazes
From: "KulasFamily" <makul9@gra.midco.net>
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 18:07:38 -0600
X-Message-Number: 7

Great ideas San D! She can order more glazes (my email was not clear) but on

a rather small budget...

----- Original Message -----
From: "San D Hasselman"

I am assuming she can not order new glazes and must use what she has. First
off she should make test tiles with the glazes so SHE can see what they look

like as well as her students. The tiles should be examples of the glazes
gloss/matt. I am not a math major but there are many permeations of how many

test glazes she could get by brushing one color over the other, or more than

one, etc, etc, etc.

Next she should teach students about pouring and splattering, scraffitto,
using different color clay bases, masking off different areas (I used
masking tape then carefully pulled off the masking tape right before
firing). You can also NOT glaze the surfaces, but paint with regular
paints, do a decoupage technique with other materials, spray paint, etc. The

alternative useages should be on pieces that will NOT be used for food or
drink (i.e. functional boxes, things with drawers, sculptural objects).

Just a word about scraffitto. I have seen some interesting pieces using this

technique where you incise a design in the leather hard clay, bisque fire
the work, then paint the glaze over the desing, then steel wool the glaze
off the pot, but leave it in the crevices of the scraffito. Doesn't take
much glaze, and it looks terrific when fired again.

Also another thing that looks terrific is if you fire your pot in one color,

ie white, and when you take it out of the kiln you take it over to the sink
while it is still pinging (and you wear gloves) and make sure you wear
safety glasses too, you run the warm pot under cold water. This will crack
the glaze all over the pot. You then put the pot aside until it is cool. You

then work in small areas by putting black ink on a rag and putting it over
the pot, making sure that you don't keep it on permanently on the glaze, but

rub it into the cracks. You get a crackle effect on your pot. This is a
technique not used for pots meant for food or drink.

San D

> >
> Anyone have advice for a new hs art teacher on glazes for her (low fire)
> ceramics unit? She inherited about 9 pints of Gare underglazes. I
> suggested
> just adding a clear glaze and giving the students the option of
> gloss/glazed
> and unglazed surfaces ( for her first year of teaching). Any additions
> that
> she should add?
> Thanks in advance for the help!!
> Mary in MN
>
>
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: yz1mzdik 2zul mt
From: ktcass001@aol.com
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 20:11:57 -0500 (EST)
X-Message-Number: 8
http://rafbud-zachpomorskie.pl/images/zh316.html	6wn7tj wk7djg
sar7wcl 
wugih
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: 50-minute periods?
From: Gayle Parent <gayleparent@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 18:57:49 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9
I have 40 minute periods with no "passing time"  between classes.  I wish it
was a bit longer.  I see some students 1x per week, I see some 2x per week,
and I see some 3x per semester.  It's a difficult schedule, I don't
understand how it helps, but it was designed to "save" band and strings,
from what I understand.
Gayle
On Dec 8, 2010, at 7:11 AM, Elizabeth Heisey wrote:
> How much time does everyone else have with their K-5 art students? Is
50-min per week average? Do you have more or less time? You can respond off
list if you like but please just help me get a very brief rough survey.
> Thanks
> Beth
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: 50-minute periods?
From: "Flora Ito" <FIto@getty.edu>
Date: Thu, 09 Dec 2010 17:59:44 -0800
X-Message-Number: 10
I will be out of the office on Friday, December 9. For assistance with a
reserved tour, please contact my colleagues in Visitor Services at
310-440-7300 or groups@getty.edu. Thank you.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: shuffled grid drawings
From: "Laura Drietz" <laura@drietz.com>
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2010 22:33:38 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11
I have taken many coloring book pages I found online, then just cut them 
apart...I would number each piece, then put them together mixed up and copy.
Then they re-draw on a grid putting them in order to make the picture.  We 
really had fun drawing pictures of teachers and administration I simplified 
with Photoshop for this.  My kids always loved these projects too, and they 
make a great fill-in lesson when you have a day or two or are going to be 
gone if you make them pretty simple or less pieces.  I also used them as an 
extra credit opportunity.
---Laura Drietz
Currently taking a break from the art teaching world.
--------------------------------------------------
From: "Tina Vercelli" <tvercelli@ardmore.k12.ok.us>
Sent: Thursday, December 09, 2010 9:26 AM
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Subject: [teacherartexchange] shuffled grid drawings
> I have discovered that my middle school students LOVE the grid drawings
> where the squares are all jumbled up and they have to draw them in the 
> right
> order. (I'm not even sure what they are called.)  They say they like it
> better than the traditional grid drawing.  I have found a few online, but
> I'm wondering if anyone knows of a book that has several of them 
> available?
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: 50-minute periods?
From: "Holmgren" <holmgren@lakedalelink.net>
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 2010 23:18:51 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12
  In our district, grade 1-5 students have art 50 minutes a week; all-day K
students have art for 40 minutes once a week--and 1/2 day K students do not
have art or any other specialists.
Mary H. 
K-3, MN
-----Original Message-----
From: Elizabeth Heisey [mailto: 
Sent: Wednesday, December 08, 2010 8:11 AM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] 50-minute periods?
How much time does everyone else have with their K-5 art students? Is 50-min
per week average? Do you have more or less time? You can respond off list if
you like but please just help me get a very brief rough survey.
Thanks
Beth
---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: 50-minute periods?
From: "Flora Ito" <FIto@getty.edu>
Date: Sat, 11 Dec 2010 11:27:10 -0800
X-Message-Number: 13
I will be out of the office on Friday, December 9. For assistance with a
reserved tour, please contact my colleagues in Visitor Services at
310-440-7300 or groups@getty.edu. Thank you.
---
END OF DIGEST
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