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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: December 05, 2005

---------

From: Lucy Brown Karwoski (lucy.kski_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Dec 08 2005 - 20:16:30 PST


Re: Holiday Project
   I displayed a variety of wintery landscapes in the art room, for
inspiration, and taught a simple one point perspective lesson based
upon a covered bridge derived from a John Gnagy book.
   The students loved it. They inspired each other with their
work.The eighth and ninth grades used water color pencils for their
final drawings, with water washes to create painterly effects. The
tenth grade created detailed black and white pencil drawings.
   I matted the most successful work and displayed it in the front
hallway of the building, on an icy blue background. I taught some of
the younger classes how to cut great snowflakes, and taped them all
around the images.
   Happy Winter!!!!
   Lucy

On 12/7/05, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, December 05, 2005.
>
> 1. Re: holiday project
> 2. Re: holiday project
> 3. Second Grade Still Life Paintings From Imagination
> 4. Re: Second Grade Still Life Paintings From Imagination
> 5. Re: holiday project
> 6. RE: Second Grade Still Life Paintings From Imagination
> 7. RE: drywall texture/paint
> 8. Re: Need Quick Drying Paint
> 9. RE: drywall texture/paint
> 10. Re: holiday project
> 11. Arts Advocacy - Teaching and Learning Strategies
> 12. Re: Second Grade Still Life Paintings From Imagination
> 13. Re: Need Quick Drying Paint
> 14. RE: xerox to canvas transfers
> 15. Re:holiday projetcs
> 16. Re: Clay Animation Questions
> 17. Re: Clay Animation Questions
> 18. Re: holiday project
> 19. Re: holiday project
> 20. Re: holiday project
> 21. holiday projects-long post for elementary level
> 22. holiday projects: poinsettias
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: holiday project
> From: chris massingill <chris_massingill@yahoo.com>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 03:54:02 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Stacie,
>
> I am a newbie to the list as well as a first year
> teacher in a brand-new program (this is our first year
> for elementary art in Arkansas) so I don't usually
> have that much to contribute and tend to be a lurker
> on the list. But I thought that I might respond to
> your holiday project question since we might be in the
> same boat.
>
> As a new teacher I don't want to be too disagreeable
> about requests from my principals (I teach elementary
> art at three schools), but I also don't want to set a
> precedent regarding holiday projects. So I have
> decided upon a happy medium.
>
> So far, when approached about holiday projects I
> remind everyone of my curriculum and frameworks and if
> pressed, I make stand alone lessons that they can use
> for display if they want to (this also allows me to
> include ALL of my students in the lesson as some
> students can't participate when it comes to Christian
> holidays)
>
> So, for example, one school insisted on "Halloween
> Masks" I didn't want to teach that lesson, so instead
> we made multicultural masks and looked at African
> masks, Mexican sun masks, chinese dragon masks, etc.
> and the kids were able to choose from pre-selected
> options for which I provided the templates.
>
> For Christmas one of my schools insisted on a backdrop
> for the "holiday concert' and so we are making a giant
> paper mural made of bulletin board paper that I taped
> together and each class that works on the project
> first gets a twenty minute lesson about Diego Rivera.
> Another school insisted on "christmas ornaments" for a
> community project where the theme is the 1940's. So,
> being passive agressive I read my students "Sadako and
> the Thousand Paper Cranes" and they are making paper
> cranes for a "peace tree" instead of a "Christmas
> tree"
>
> You will probably have to decide for yourself how you
> want to handle holidays, but this has been my personal
> solution.
>
> Chris Massingill in Central Arkansas
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> __________________________________________
> Yahoo! DSL ? Something to write home about.
> Just $16.99/mo. or less.
> dsl.yahoo.com
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: holiday project
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2005 05:43:18 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Chris,
> You may be a newbie and a first year teacher but
> your solutions sound like many years of experience. You
> seem to have the diplomatic skills to swim between the
> currents. Best of luck over the next 30 years of
> enjoyable and productive teaching.
> Woody
>
> chris massingill wrote:
> > I am a newbie to the list as well as a first year
> > teacher in a brand-new program (this is our first year
> > for elementary art in Arkansas) so I don't usually
> > have that much to contribute and tend to be a lurker
> > on the list. But I thought that I might respond to
> > your holiday project question since we might be in the
> > same boat.
>
> > As a new teacher I don't want to be too disagreeable
> > So I have decided upon a happy medium.
>
> > "Halloween Masks" we made multicultural masks and looked at African
> > masks, Mexican sun masks, chinese dragon masks, etc.
>
> > For Christmas backdrop for the "holiday concert'
> > giant paper murallesson about Diego Rivera.
> > "christmas ornaments" for a they are making paper
> > cranes for a "peace tree"
> --
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art & Fear?
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html
> Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
> http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Second Grade Still Life Paintings From Imagination
> From: lindwood@webtv.net
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 07:15:52 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Hi all,
> I just added a gorgeous collection of paintings by my second
> graders. I showed them a Power Point of still life paintings by a wide
> variety of artists. While we looked at the wide variety of subject
> matter, we focused on the line and pattern of Matisse still life
> paintings, and I introduced them to the word "painterly" and taught them
> to double load their brushes to create textures and blend colors.
>
> Day one and two were spent drawing several black ink brush line
> drawings of flowers and containers made up from their imagination. We
> looked at different flowers and discussed the elipse of vases and other
> containers. We used Sax Ultra Plus Tempera to paint them. Pattern and
> texture were again emphasized, as well as color theory of complementary
> colors and contrast.
>
> I think they turned out so beautifully. Our development office is going
> to make thank you cards for donors from them. Our LS principal is going
> to color xerox a number of them to hang in her office. The entire
> exhibit is creating a major wow effect.
>
> TO see them, the easiest way is to go to our www.sjs.org website, click
> on the student button. Scroll to the bottom of the page, and click on
> the media gallery. They are titled "Class Two Still Life Paintings from
> Imagination" There are some amazing paintings here, in my most humble
> opinion. Enjoy!
>
> Linda
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Second Grade Still Life Paintings From Imagination
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2005 06:51:53 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Fantastic paintings, congrats, Woody
>
> lindwood@webtv.net wrote:
> > Hi all,
> > I just added a gorgeous collection of paintings by my second
> > graders. I showed them a Power Point of still life paintings by a wide
> > variety of artists. While we looked at the wide variety of subject
> > matter, we focused on the line and pattern of Matisse still life
> > paintings, and I introduced them to the word "painterly" and taught them
> > to double load their brushes to create textures and blend colors.
>
> > TO see them, the easiest way is to go to our www.sjs.org website, click
> > on the student button. Scroll to the bottom of the page, and click on
> > the media gallery. They are titled "Class Two Still Life Paintings from
> > Imagination" There are some amazing paintings here, in my most humble
> > opinion. Enjoy!
> > Linda
>
> --
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art & Fear?
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html
> Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
> http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: holiday project
> From: Judy Decker <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 09:58:00 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Hi Stacie,
>
> Poinsettias make a nice holiday display. You can purchase a few plants
> for students to draw from life. Tie some art history by looking at the
> paintings of Georgia O'Keeffe' have the students really focus down on
> the plant.
>
> I did pen and ink poinsettia drawings with sixth graders. They could
> also include a dove in the drawing if they wished. They selected one
> part of the drawing to add color. We use tissue paper collage.
>
> Torn paper poinsettia collage might be nice.
>
> There are two sites that have interesting facts about poinsettias.
> http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/poinsettia/
>
> and
> http://www.ecke.com/html/h_corp/corp_hist.html
>
> At my former school, six grade students made large paper poinsettias
> to decorate the hallways. The classroom teachers did this.
>
> I couldn't find the "How to" online they way they did them... but
> there are other how tos. You could share them with the classroom
> teachers.
>
> Kindergarten and first grade could do these (with several students
> working together to make one flower).
> http://www.enchantedlearning.com/crafts/christmas/poinsettia/
>
> Here is one to share with classroom teachers:
> http://www.kckpl.lib.ks.us/ys/CRAFTS/poinset.htm
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Judy Decker
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Second Grade Still Life Paintings From Imagination
> From: "bicyclken@earthlink.net" <bicyclken@earthlink.net>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 07:00:57 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> About the still life paintings from Linda at St. John's School, these are
> fantastic. I mean I wish I could get my art 4 seniors to be loose and free
> like that. Marvelous use of color, values, composition, etc. I think they
> would be great matted and framed. They remind me of Matisse and other
> artists of that time who would paint without abandon. I love it.
>
> Ken Schwab
>
> bicyclken@earthlink.net
> http://room3art.com
>
>
> > [Original Message]
> > From: <lindwood@webtv.net>
> > To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > Date: 12/6/2005 5:16:26 AM
> > Subject: [teacherartexchange] Second Grade Still Life Paintings From
> Imagination
> >
> > Hi all,
> > I just added a gorgeous collection of paintings by my second
> > graders. I showed them a Power Point of still life paintings by a wide
> > variety of artists. While we looked at the wide variety of subject
> > matter, we focused on the line and pattern of Matisse still life
> > paintings, and I introduced them to the word "painterly" and taught them
> > to double load their brushes to create textures and blend colors.
> >
> > Day one and two were spent drawing several black ink brush line
> > drawings of flowers and containers made up from their imagination. We
> > looked at different flowers and discussed the elipse of vases and other
> > containers. We used Sax Ultra Plus Tempera to paint them. Pattern and
> > texture were again emphasized, as well as color theory of complementary
> > colors and contrast.
> >
> > I think they turned out so beautifully. Our development office is going
> > to make thank you cards for donors from them. Our LS principal is going
> > to color xerox a number of them to hang in her office. The entire
> > exhibit is creating a major wow effect.
> >
> > TO see them, the easiest way is to go to our www.sjs.org website, click
> > on the student button. Scroll to the bottom of the page, and click on
> > the media gallery. They are titled "Class Two Still Life Paintings from
> > Imagination" There are some amazing paintings here, in my most humble
> > opinion. Enjoy!
> >
> > Linda
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: drywall texture/paint
> From: "bicyclken@earthlink.net" <bicyclken@earthlink.net>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 07:08:47 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> In my class we do a relief with matt boards, toilet paper, drywall paste
> glue, etc. we cover it with gesso or acrylic primer and the use acrylic
> paint. It is then antique with oil paint. very interesting results.
>
> Ken Schwab
>
> bicyclken@earthlink.net
> http://room3art.com
>
>
> > [Original Message]
> > From: Duffey, Patrick G. <DuffeyP@Peninsula.wednet.edu>
> > To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > Date: 12/5/2005 6:51:33 PM
> > Subject: [teacherartexchange] drywall texture/paint
> >
> > You can paint any drywall joint or topping compound that you have used
> > as a texture after it is dry with PVA (poly vinyl acetate) a drywall
> > sealer, or latex or acrylic paint. I have had great success using any
> > light color latex paint as a base coat and then paint with acrylic
> > paints and mediums. Check out the book "The Paint Effects Bible" by
> > Jerry Skinner...there are lots of water based recipes for paint effects
> > in there
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Peri Raygor-Yanez [mailto:perigraphics@earthlink.net]
> > Sent: Saturday, December 03, 2005 1:47 PM
> > To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> > Subject: [teacherartexchange] Paint medium to build up texture
> >
> > Linda,
> > Drywall topping, especially the lightweight variety works well if you
> > put it on first then paint on top of it. It is cheap and fluffy. You
> > might try adding dry tempera to it, but I tried adding paint to it
> > and plastering my studio wall and it stunk like sour milk for 2
> > years. I kid you not! For my students, I had them put the "mud" on
> > masonite. It was dry by the next day. Then we tempera painted and
> > gold leafed the stuff. It lasts forever and the students were
> > thrilled to use "faux-painting" techniques.
> >
> > Peri Raygor-Yanez
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Need Quick Drying Paint
> From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
> Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2005 08:16:13 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> Hi, Woody,
>
> If all you're trying to do is seal the plate for inking, what about
> spraying with fixative? Or even hairspray (the dollar-store kind)?
>
> I'm surprised latex house paint wouldn't dry in time. I know when I
> paint my walls here in Tucson, they are dry to touch in that amount of
> time. You're not in Kansas anymore; doesn't Alby's arid climate dry the
> paint in your time frame? Someday I'll have to get over to Alby and
> take one of your workshops. I was in Santa Fe for a few days the week
> before Thanksgiving and fell in love with it all over again.
> Unfortunately, it's a very expensive crush....
>
> Maggie
>
> Woody Duncan wrote:
>
> > I do a collograph printmaking workshop that requires
> > painting the printing plate (and then drying time)
> > prior to inking and printing. Normally I use some
> > cheap white house paint. But for workshops it would
> > be great if I could coat the plates with something
> > that would dry completely in a very short time. By
> > that I mean 20 - 30 minutes. Does anyone know what
> > I could use (just for workshops).
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: drywall texture/paint
> From: Diane Davis <dianemdavis@mac.com>
> Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2005 07:20:53 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> I do cave drawings by having students cover drywall with plaster to make their own cave walls. They create a texture in the plaster and we incorporate that texture into our paintings. I use both watercolors and tempera on the plaster,covering them with a tempera varnish so the paints don't flake off. They look awesome.
> diane
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: holiday project
> From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
> Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2005 08:24:54 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> Chris,
>
> Your lessons for subverting holiday "art" requests are fantastic and
> creative. You're being mindful of your curricular standards as well as
> being sensitive to your students' diversity, AND appeasing your various
> admins. You should give some thought to presenting your philosophy and
> ideas at an NAEA conference. Although I was fortunate I never had admin
> or teachers trying to interfere with my curric, a lot of teachers have
> to navigate that slippery slope.
>
> maggie
>
> chris massingill wrote:
>
> ><snip>
> >
> >So far, when approached about holiday projects I
> >remind everyone of my curriculum and frameworks and if
> >pressed, I make stand alone lessons that they can use
> >for display if they want to (this also allows me to
> >include ALL of my students in the lesson as some
> >students can't participate when it comes to Christian
> >holidays) <snip>
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Arts Advocacy - Teaching and Learning Strategies
> From: Judy Decker <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 14:29:13 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> Samantha sent me this link for articles on Arts Advocacy.
> Arts in Education:
> http://www.newhorizons.org/strategies/arts/front_arts.htm
>
> You might be interested in checking out some of the other topics, too
> Teaching and Learning Strategies
> http://www.newhorizons.org/strategies/front_strategies.html
> Articles on assessment, differentiated instruction, multiple
> intelligences, multicultural education and more.
> From New Horizons for Learning:
> http://www.newhorizons.org/
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
> Incredible Art Department
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> Incredible Art Resources
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Second Grade Still Life Paintings From Imagination
> From: Kristina <mhamster@earthlink.net>
> Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2005 13:51:29 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
>
> >> We used Sax Ultra Plus Tempera to paint them.
>
> What kind of paper/board did you use?
>
> and thanks susan for the brushes 101...
>
> Kristina
> who found a Sax catalog and is now comparing
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Need Quick Drying Paint
> From: "Sidnie Miller" <smiller@elko.k12.nv.us>
> Date: Tue, 06 Dec 2005 12:19:36 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
> Woody--My favorite tool (for the impatient) is a heat gun from Walmart. I =
> use it all the
> time for everything--it's great for hardening up clay, but I also use it =
> in altered books to
> speed up drying time. If the acrylic is gloss and think it will bubble. =
> Flat white is great. The
> guns get really hot (700 degrees) so you have to be careful about what =
> surface you heat on--
> you could line up some bricks or use a kiln shelf. If you're gluing stuff =
> on it may affect the
> glue--try it. Sid
>
> >>> woodyduncan@comcast.net 12/05/05 4:57 PM >>>
> I do a collograph printmaking workshop that requires
> painting the printing plate (and then drying time)
> prior to inking and printing. Normally I use some
> cheap white house paint. But for workshops it would
> be great if I could coat the plates with something
> that would dry completely in a very short time. By
> that I mean 20 - 30 minutes. Does anyone know what
> I could use (just for workshops). It's complicated
> to have participants come back later to print their
> plates. Any suggestions would be welcome.
> Woody
> --=20
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net=20
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html=20
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art & Fear?
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html=20
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html=20
> Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
> http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html=20
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to=20
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: xerox to canvas transfers
> From: "Judi Morgan" <judi.morgan@sgs.org>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 15:44:13 -0800
> X-Message-Number: 14
>
> Have you tried wintergreen oil? You can find it in the health food
> section as an essential oil. It also transfers, smells great, and isn't
> hazardous. We have used it to transfer Xerox images onto zinc plates
> for etching.
>
> Judi Morgan
> Saint George's School
> 2929 W. Waikiki Road
> Spokane, WA 99208
> 509.466.1636
> judi.morgan@sgs.org
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Sue Stevens [mailto:suestevens@rogers.com]=20
> Sent: Tuesday, November 22, 2005 4:59 PM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] xerox to canvas transfers
>
> Have you tried nail polish remover?
> I do a xerox transfer project with my seniors - basically I have a one
> page=20
> handout full of a variety of clip art images I have found - we cut out
> what=20
> we want to use, and then place face down onto paper, and rub nail polish
>
> remover onto the back - the xerox tranfers quite well.
> Different papers react differently of course - some are better than
> others.
> The photocopy has to be heavy ink, and a lazer image (not ink jet)
> Also, the nail polish remover has to be acetone (not the non-acetone
> stuff).
> I usually get the lemon smelling stuff - hahaha!
> Good luck
> Sue=20
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to=20
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re:holiday projetcs
> From: "christine" <kotarsky@bellsouth.net>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 18:50:45 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 15
>
> Stacie
> I have done 2 projects in the past. 1 was to teach 1 pt perspective and draw
> cubes and then turn the cubes into gifts or other objects that are cubes and
> rectangular prisms. Also we did a water color painting of winter. We Drew
> snowpeople. For each of the 3 circles we mixed the coplementary colors
> groups. Each circle for the snowguy/gal was modeled using a different shade.
> Gray winter sky, leaving white for snow. They looked very cold. You wouldn't
> know about this in Miami.
> Hope this helps
> Christine
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Clay Animation Questions
> From: "Rick Larson" <jrlarson51@comcast.net>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 20:02:46 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 16
>
> Michal, I couldn't find the free download on this site- it was probably
> right in front of me. Could you please tell me where to look on there?
> Thanks,
> Betsy
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2005 9:20 AM
> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Clay Animation Questions
>
>
> > There is a free software program that you can download at
> > http://www.animateclay.com/ that really simplifies the entire process.
> > Another REALLY simple program that I use is the one that comes in the kit
> > that is in several of the art supply catalogs (mine came from either
> > United Art & Education or Sax) -you can see it at
> > http://www.tech4learning.com/claykit/ (they have a website by the same
> > name where you can see samples done with their software). They also have
> > lesson plans AND a 30 day free trial. The kit runs under $50. As for
> > cameras, I use my son's webcam - it cost around $25 and works great.
> > Images are downloaded instantly.
> >
> > ~Michal
> > K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> > http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Clay Animation Questions
> From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 19:58:13 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 17
>
> I had forgotten how difficult the exact page was to find - Sorry!!! It's at
> http://www.animateclay.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=24&page=1
> If the link is too long you may want to cut & paste. The name of the program
> is "Anasazi Stop Motion Animator".
>
> I purchased "Claymation Christmas" from E-bay to show my class tomorrow.
> These kids are AMAZING! I showed them Gumby - 2 months ago they would have
> thought it was cheesy, but now they are making comments about how difficult
> and time consuming the opening shots would be. They started debating about
> how "Rudolph" MIGHT be clay animation, but definately was stop-animation.
> They knew immediately that Wallace & Grommit and Chicken Run were clay
> animation. They are really discussing backgrounds, facial expressions, how
> to do certain scenes. I am in awe at how far my middle school students have
> come in their thought process. I am planning on having my 2nd graders write
> stories in groups during my library class and having my middle school
> students animate them next semester.
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
>
>
> > Michal, I couldn't find the free download on this site- it was probably
> > right in front of me. Could you please tell me where to look on there?
> > Thanks,
> > Betsy
> >
> >> There is a free software program that you can download at
> >> http://www.animateclay.com/ that really simplifies the entire process.
> >> Another REALLY simple program that I use is the one that comes in the kit
> >> that is in several of the art supply catalogs (mine came from either
> >> United Art & Education or Sax) -you can see it at
> >> http://www.tech4learning.com/claykit/ (they have a website by the same
> >> name where you can see samples done with their software). They also have
> >> lesson plans AND a 30 day free trial. The kit runs under $50. As for
> >> cameras, I use my son's webcam - it cost around $25 and works great.
> >> Images are downloaded instantly.
> >>
> >> ~Michal
> >> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> >> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: holiday project
> From: StacieMich@aol.com
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 21:35:27 EST
> X-Message-Number: 18
>
> Great ideas, thanks!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: holiday project
> From: StacieMich@aol.com
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 21:43:25 EST
> X-Message-Number: 19
>
> Thanks, it's my first year too, and the director kind of calls the shots. I
> have also been asked to do the backdrop for the holiday show next week. I'm
> going to do that afterschool with volunteers instead of waste class time. I
> had actually been wanting to teach the kids about Diego Rivera but had not come
> up with a lesson for them to do yet, so that's an idea. When they ask me to
> do these special projects, I try to come up with an artist to relate to the
> project, but this was dumped on me yesterday. I had no time to prepare.
> Actually, today was a terrible day, and I just don' thave th energy to put together
> a comprehensive lesson. Thanks for the ideas though!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: holiday project
> From: StacieMich@aol.com
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 21:45:29 EST
> X-Message-Number: 20
>
> Thanks so much. I'm actually doing a Georgia O'Keeffe lesson right now with
> my middle school kids. I didn't even think of buying poinsettias. I'll check
> if the grocery store has them yet.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: holiday projects-long post for elementary level
> From: "Jeryl Hollingsworth" <holl5@innova.net>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 22:23:43 -0500 (EST)
> X-Message-Number: 21
>
> I have done several holiday projects lately with different grade levels
> because 1.schedule changes with classes gone on field experiences(can't
> call them field trips anymore) and 2.practices for chorus programs etc.and
> we have done service learning projects of painting post office windows,
> making ornaments for the town tree, decorating the bank, and office
> windows at my school. I don't have anything else scheduled, right?
> Seriously, I try to be as accomodating as possible (within reason). My
> principal respects my program, gives me budget considerations and listens
> to my ideas if I go along with some of her agendas! So having said that, I
> try to make all holiday art tie in with standards and use recycle stuff if
> possible. Some ideas...These are going to be quick. e-mail me if you want
> photos or more details-after I take the art club to the bank tomorrow!
> Making faux stained glass windows-drawing the design on white
> paper, then laying it over laminating film that has been saved-you
> know how there is that wasted space when the machine is first run?
> They draw and color with sharpies and then cut out circles of
> black construction paper for the frame, glue it down and trim. I
> have a good supplies of markers because they ask the art club to
> make signs for our business partners golf tournament every year
> and I agree if they buy us a bunch of colored sharpies
> Gingerbread men-(1st grade) I let them use a pattern and cut them
> out of sandpaper (get it cheap at the dollar store) and then paint
> on the features. This year a print shop donated lots of cardstock
> so they cut them out of tan paper and used crazy scissors to cut
> frosting out of scrap paper-also cut a ton of round stickers from
> a company and they used those for buttons, etc.. These look really
> cute in the front office.
> CD ornaments-sharpies again on cds. Color both sides and glue
> together with elmers. The tech person saved me tons of cds this
> summer when they put in new computers. I have also gotten them
> from a local store that aol promotions cds they were tossing. Art
> club got fancy and made theirs 3-d by gluing half of one on each
> side. I gently broke them and glued the halves together.
> toilet paper ornaments-these are un believably cool. You cut a
> third of the way in all around both ends of the tubes- I told them
> to cut as wide as their finger, bend the ends up-paint and glitter
> while they were still wet. These were a little messy- I gave them
> primary colors at several paint stations that I set up while they
> were painting and then had two glitter stations over coke box
> lids. I tied them with yarn and hung on wire hangers on the drying
> rack. These sound tacky but look unbelievable. Not many teachers
> could guess what we used.
> light paintings....3rd or 4th grade. I cut paper in 6 X 18 strips.
> Gave them green permanent markers (someone gave me a bunch of
> permanent ones- always send home a wish list!) which they used to
> draw a light cord across the page. I cut out a Christmas light
> pattern about 3 inches high. They trace about 7-9 lights across the
> strand and then come to a paint table to choose 2 primary colors +
> white. I squirt a dab in egg cartons and they don't gt water. This
> is a great color mixing lesson and they have fun making different
> tints for their lights. (the reason I give them the pattern is
> because I want them to focus on painting instead of spending the
> whole time trying to draw lights-most of these are one day lessons)
> These look great hung in a row-like a giant string of lights
> bell chains- this is a folding cutting activity a little more
> advanced than the traditional chain. They have to cut a bell on
> the fold and it gets hooked together without tape or glue-you
> would have to see this probably. Anyway I do a contest with the 4
> 1st grades to see which class make the longest chain in one class
> time- While they are cutting I work with a small group at a time
> making a pinata -request of teachers for their Christmas around
> the world. It works pretty well to do papier mache with only 7-8
> at a time.
> christmas diorama scenes- some of my 5th graders started doing this
> and it caught on. They are using pieces of matt board scraps to
> make little Christmas scenes about 6 inches wide and high. They
> take a piece and draw the wall with a fireplace , window, chair,
> etc.. Glue it to a piece for the floor and then make a standing up
> CHristmas tree, make little presents to go under it, little rugs on
> the floor, etc.. They are getting really creative with these. I
> still have a great source for endless scraps. My daughter is
> engaged to the son of the local framer!
> Painting poinsettias- I do this with kdg since they are studying
> the letter P. we look at lots of Christmas cards with photos of
> poinsettias and then they paint a big flower on green paper and
> punch yellow paper to drop the circles in the middle. Punch,
> paint, poinsettias-get it? I usually have them paint on 12 x 18
> green paper. They look really nice and sometimes the art club
> kids cut them out and cut leaf shapes from the green background.
> excuse the typos and quick thoughts-I haven't posted much lately-just
> lurking. I have been really busy this year-full load of 500+ kids, got
> stuck with the visually gifted program the week school started, I'm the
> team leader and also got tagged to lead the related arts book chat this
> semester,was our school representative on a big referendum vote to
> raise bonds for a new school (we won) and won a 4,000. state grant
> which is getting me all kinds of cool tech stuff in my room but its
> taking a lot time getting it all intergrated into my program.
> maybe things will slow down soon? HA!
> only 6 full days till break!!!
> Jeryl in SC
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: holiday projects: poinsettias
> From: wendy free <wendypaigefree@yahoo.com>
> Date: Tue, 6 Dec 2005 20:28:36 -0800 (PST)
> X-Message-Number: 22
>
> a quick note - when i do poinsettia studies i call and
> ask businesses to donate a few since i'm constantly
> trying not to spend so much $ out of my own pocket. i
> write an official letter so that the business has a
> record of the donation for write off purposes and
> afterwords have given color copies and/or photos of
> the work students did along with a thank you note from
> me. i've had walmart, publix (a regional grocery
> chain), target, lowe's, home depot, and the local
> florists all donate a few plants and they were really
> nice... we did christmas cacti, too.
>
> :D happy holidays!
>
> wendy free
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
>

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