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Re: [teacherartexchange] Clay Animation Questions

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sharon_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Thu Dec 01 2005 - 19:57:33 PST


Kristina wrote:

>Could you please keep this onlist for all of us.
>
>
>
Yes, I can do that--I just wasn't sure how much this topic had already
been discussed and didn't want to be too repetitive. :-)

As I'm brainstorming this, animation (using "tangible" things like clay
or wire OR "drawn" images) will be one option for projects for my
advanced students when we return from the winter break. I have small,
mixed-level classes BUT I also have just one camera (my personal 3 mp
camera) and just one computer (my school-issued personal non-Mac laptop).

A couple of times over the last 6-7 years, I've developed projects
around the movie "Labyrinth" and the kids have really, really enjoyed
it. One year they all did "Screamers" (
http://www.art-rageous.net/Creatures.html ) and another year they had a
choice of making creature figure sculptures or masks.

This year both Art I and Advanced Art students will be watching the
movie and doing the homework assignments I've already put together on
Jim Henson, Brian Froud, etc., and although this unit will be "new" to
all but one of my students, I want to include more project choices for
my advanced students. I've got one who's interested in set design and
another who's interested in costume design, so there will be project
choices related to those movie-related fields.

On my computer at home I have a program called "Gif Animator" from
Coffee Cup Software. I've used it to make some short animated things
(like quickly displaying a variety of still images) but I haven't
attempted anything that's like "real" animation and movement. If it
will work for that, I might be able to load it on my school computer.

I know I'll need to get a tripod and make sure I have a good and
consistent light source, but I'm looking for some technical information,
such as how many images do you need per second to make something that's
not too terribly jerky?

Sorry for the delayed response with this--I'm also up to my ears with
yearbook production now through March! :-0

-- 
Sharon
www.art-rageous.net
www.cafepress.com/artrageous
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