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Re: lousy coloring skills?!

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ARTNSOUL12_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Sun Dec 07 2003 - 04:25:24 PST


In a message dated 12/06/2003 9:34:20 PM Eastern Standard Time,
mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com writes:
One of the things that has amazed me is how poorly the students color
with colored pencils, crayons, and oil pastels. They just scribble the
color on in different directions, using long strokes which make the
color streaky, making the colors look pastel, not pressing down to get a
richer color without all the "holes" of white paper showing through.
And, *gasp*, they go outside the lines. They are often resistant to my
demos showing how to fill in their shapes with solid color.
Hi, Maggie!
It's funny that this is why I have an adversion to colored pencils and
especially crayons! I NEVER give them crayons or colored pencils because of exactly
what you describe.

 So here's my secret: When the project calls for it, I always have them use
water soluble colored pencils. The prang brand is expensive but absolutely
wonderful. And, the kids love coloring with colored pencils and then using
clear water over the colors to blend- ah, the pencil turns magically to paint,
and, voila!, no scribble marks! Craypas can be more easily blended, but I find
that painting large areas is the most successful techique with this age group.
I always thought that my kids are always painting because paint is my
favorite medium to use in my personal work. But, now that you brought up the
subject, I realize that everything my students color look better painted and that
they have the most success and control with paint.

For example, I did a version of Bunki's lesson, the 3-d boxes with the
"squigglies" running through the holes. Thanks, Bunki, for sharing that project
with us, my kids loved it! It was a disaster for my 5th graders when I tried to
get them to color neatly with the Prang colored pencils. As soon as I
switched to the Prang water soluble colored pencils, their art took on a "finished"
look. O.k, o.k, I'll get around to putting it on my school website, or I
should say I'll eventually get someone to show me how to do it, so you can see what
I mean.
Susan on Long Island (where we just had the most gloriously beautiful
blizzard-I'm inspired to paint today!)

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