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RE: on teaching painting

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From: Payne, Debbie (dpayne_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Dec 02 2003 - 12:42:02 PST


I teach 4 levels of painting in a curriculum that has Drawing and Painting I, II, Interpretive Drawing and Painting and finally AP Studio Art. In the Drawing and Painting I we work exclusively with black and white. Using acrylic paint first then watercolor value work with flat and graded washes. The students begin by painting black and white, flat sided objects like boxes, slides, cinder blocks etc. The second painting is of round objects, like bottles, cups, wooden spools painted black and white and then the third is of metal, glass and water on a piece of plexiglas so there is a little reflection. Then their final acrylic painting is a self portrait taken from a digital photograph. The water color unit is very similar.
In Drawing and painting II the students are introduced to color and the names of tube colors like cadmium red light, yellow oxide etc. The first still life is all plastic objects and paper wrapped books in all different colors. The main objective is to match the colors in light and shadow. The objects are so simple the technique of painting the objects should not be too challenging, Matching the colors however is difficult. The next painting deals with how to approach painting. Blocking in the major shapes and developing from general to specific. For this one I use and slide and focus it in slowly so they can't see the details until the end. Then we do some palette knife painting from observation and then we look to Leroy Nieman for inspiration for our final which is a group of figures in action. Let me know if you want to know about the Interpretive painting assignments or the AP. Don't want to overwhelm the strand.

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> From: Randy Menninghaus
> Reply To: ArtsEdNet Talk
> Sent: Tuesday, December 2, 2003 6:04 AM
> To: ArtsEdNet Talk
> Subject: on teaching painting
>
> I am trying to figure out a way to adapt our hIgh school program. We are a regional high school and students are coming in with fewer and fewer painting experiences. The skill levels are very low and the ability to develop personally meaningful imagery seems nil. Add three other teachers in the same program area that use clip art or pure copying as primary subject matter and you have me, one discouraged art puppy. Could we start a strand on sequential ways to improve skill level... brush control, color control,surface feel ... and ways to work students towards more self generated imagery...
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> Oh , add a small room, with full classes, each student carrying a huge gym bag, & few if any safe places to use still life set ups...I would say I have no places... but with a lot of haggling I can set up still lifes. I do not feel students can get very close to them.... which creates other problems.
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> I am thinking about over a three year period . Most of our students don't take 4 sequential years.
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> thank you Randy in cold, snow-less Maine.
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