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Lesson Plans


RE: CONTENT and STRUCTURE

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Bob Beeching (robprod)
Fri, 20 Aug 1999 20:55:33 -0700


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ON CONTENT and STRUCTURE:

The American Public School system is in constant flux; modifying, =
changing, and correcting content and structure. When it comes to =
curriculum planning, the visual and performing arts have been used and =
abused throughout this century simply because there has never been a =
unifying and concerted effort to integrate and to formalize ARTS =
training in grades P/K through 8th grade. Educational psychologists - =
rather than artists - have usurped the positions of advocacy in terms of =
content and procedure.

It is not as though many attempts have not been made to bring the arts =
into the classroom with the introduction of printed text, audiovisual, =
and - now - computer-driven programs. The central problem has always =
been the lack of training in our formative years. Unlike the study of =
reading, writing, and arithmetic - that begins in kindergarten - most =
Americans are not introduced to formal art training until reaching high =
school - if at all.

Consequently, those untrained in the visual arts tend to resort to =
one-time "crafts projects" rather than to a traditional scope and =
sequence approach to visual arts instruction. This is not the case for =
music, dance, or physical education, where there has always been a =
strong emphasis placed on demonstration, concerted effort, and =
continuous practice.

All artists begin as craftsmen and women learning the various processes =
and skills required to render a piece of art. But not all craftsmen and =
women necessary become artists. Those who study reading, writing, and =
arithmetic do not necessarily become authors or mathematicians. The same =
is true for visual arts training. But the applications of what one =
learns in the arts transfer into many other areas of human conduct, i.e. =
biology, geology, dentistry, and surgery; where eye-hand coordination =
skills become paramount.

We are entering a highly impacted visual environment where the arts are =
becoming prominent in all phases of communications. If we do not expose =
children to the arts in their formative years - by the year 2000 - more =
artists will continue to be hired from off shore Europe and Southeast =
Asia to fill positions that now go begging for the lack of =
American-trained industrial and graphics designers, animators, and =
illustrators.

There are those of us who have a foot in both worlds of education and =
industry, and who are ready to share our expertise with the classroom =
teacher. The problem has always been one of non-participation and =
denial. We don't miss what we have not experienced, and if teachers =
continue to avoid training in the ARTS, our curriculums of instruction =
will continue to lack the "core" from which all learning stems; =
LEARN-BY-DOING!

SEE: http://www.sierratel.com/robprod/dteknetwork.jpg

_________________________________________________________________________=
_______rb

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ON CONTENT and STRUCTURE:

The American Public School system is in constant flux; modifying, = changing,=20 and correcting content and structure. When it comes to curriculum = planning, the=20 visual and performing arts have been used and abused throughout this = century=20 simply because there has never been a unifying and concerted effort to = integrate=20 and to formalize ARTS training in grades P/K through 8th = grade.=20 Educational psychologists - rather than artists - have usurped the = positions of=20 advocacy in terms of content and procedure.

It is not as though many attempts have not been made to bring the = arts into=20 the classroom with the introduction of printed text, audiovisual, and - = now -=20 computer-driven programs. The central problem has always been the lack = of=20 training in our formative years. Unlike the study of reading, writing, = and=20 arithmetic - that begins in kindergarten - most Americans are not = introduced to=20 formal art training until reaching high school - if at all.

Consequently, those untrained in the visual arts tend to resort to = one-time=20 "crafts projects" rather than to a traditional scope and sequence = approach to=20 visual arts instruction. This is not the case for music, dance, or = physical=20 education, where there has always been a strong emphasis placed on=20 demonstration, concerted effort, and continuous practice.

All artists begin as craftsmen and women learning the various = processes and=20 skills required to render a piece of art. But not all craftsmen and = women=20 necessary become artists. Those who study reading, writing, and = arithmetic do=20 not necessarily become authors or mathematicians. The same is true for = visual=20 arts training. But the applications of what one learns in the arts = transfer into=20 many other areas of human conduct, i.e. biology, geology, dentistry, and = surgery; where eye-hand coordination skills become paramount.

We are entering a highly impacted visual environment where the arts = are=20 becoming prominent in all phases of communications. If we do not expose = children=20 to the arts in their formative years - by the year 2000 - more artists = will=20 continue to be hired from off shore Europe and Southeast Asia to fill = positions=20 that now go begging for the lack of American-trained industrial and = graphics=20 designers, animators, and illustrators.

There are those of us who have a foot in both worlds of education and = industry, and who are ready to share our expertise with the classroom = teacher.=20 The problem has always been one of non-participation and denial. We = don't miss=20 what we have not experienced, and if teachers continue to avoid training = in the=20 ARTS, our curriculums of instruction will continue to lack the "core" = from which=20 all learning stems; LEARN-BY-DOING!

SEE: http://www.sier= ratel.com/robprod/dteknetwork.jpg

______________________________________________________________________= __________rb

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