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Lesson Plans


re: visually impaired

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Sidnie Miller (sidmill.us)
Fri, 20 Aug 1999 19:23:34 -0700 (PDT)


I had a student who was visually impaired but not in a usual way.
She had told people that she could only see when she turned sideways
and looked out the corners of her eye (she has a progressive, degenerative
disease). I had the kids look in mirrors and draw self-portraits. She
started on one edge and drew an ear and hair and part of an eye, then she
went over to the other edge and drew the counterpart leaving nothing in
the empty space in the whole center of the paper. I was sort of shocked
and showed her mother who was flabbergasted. She showed her doctors and
everyone was so excited to understand visually what she had been trying to
explain. It helped with their diagnosis of her problem. When you see
artwork that doesn't fall in any normal range of ability--make sure you
contact care givers. It can be quite helpful. Sid

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# Sidnie Miller #
# Elko Junior High School #
# 777 Country Club Drive #
# Elko, NV 89801 #
# 702-738-7236 #
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On Sun, 15 Aug 1999, McGugan wrote:

> I had two visually impaired students my very first year of teaching. They were in the 5th grade and each had some vision, one peripherally and the other tunnel, so they could barely see lines on paper when drawing. Other lessons that were very successful were weaving, papermaking (one of the girls was outraged because her "helper" did everything for her, on the 2nd go round she did every step by herself), drawing on paper with glue lines and filling in after it was dried with pastel, etc; counter repousee with aluminum sheets from the newspaper; printmaking done with cut cardboard or innertube shapes. THEY taught me a lot that year.
> Joy
>