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Lesson Plans


Some Basic Art ideas 4U

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
MaryAnn Kohl (maryann)
Mon, 16 Aug 99 16:38:55 -0700


Hi, y'all.
I was just thinking: basic, old ideas are sometimes the best. That's how they become basic and old (ha ha).
Here are some easy art ideas .... some basic and not new, others maybe new to you .... that are reminderes of good things to do with kids of all ages. Thought you might enjoy having them. I chopped these out of Preschool Art, one of the books I have written/compiled, but they work with all ages.

Have fun! Doncha just love doing this stuff?????
MaryAnn :o)

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Wet Chalk Drawing
(all ages)
prep=easy
drawing<

Materials
sugar solution (1 cup sugar to 1 cup water) in a container
poster chalk
paper
hair spray, optional

Art Process
1. Soak poster chalk overnight in sugar solution.
2. Draw with the wet chalk on paper. The sugar-water help brighten the chalk colors and keeps the drawing from smearing too much.
3. Dry the completed art project.
4. Spray the completed drawing with hair spray (outside) if a completely non-smear drawing is desired.

Variation
- Dip the end of dry chalk into the sugar solution and draw with the dampened chalk.
Hints:
- Keep in mind that chalk has unique qualities. It breaks easily; it smudges; it does not act like crayon; it can be brushed with a cotton ball, cotton swab or tissue; its colors can be blended, used brightly or lightly; it can be crushed and used as powder; powdered chalks can be mixed to make new chalk colors; it is messy and beautiful.

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Crayon Rubbing
(all ages)
prep=easy
drawing

Materials
large, peeled crayons
butcher paper or construction paper
objects with textures for rubbings:
pieces of yarn, pieces of sandpaper, shapes cut or torn from heavy paper,
leaves, scraps of fabric glued to cards, other flat or textured items

Art Process
1. Place chosen objects under the heavy paper.
2. Tape the corners of the paper to the work surface to prevent shifting paper.
3. Holding the paper down with one hand, gently rub the flat side of the crayon over the covered objects.
4. An imprint of the covered object will appear on the paper.
Hints: Younger children will achieve varying degrees of quality with rubbings. Age and experience will affect the final outcome. Expect vigorous arm movements and torn or wiggling paper if the project is not taped to the work surface. Some artists may not really care about finding the imprint of the covered object. Others may be too young to achieve an imprint that is recognized by an adult. All these results are normal for young children and should be accepted and enjoyed.

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Paint Dough
(all ages)
prep=easy
some help
painting

Materials
flour
water
salt
liquid tempera paint
measuring cup
bowls, mixing spoons
posterboard or matte board
plastic squeeze bottles

Art Process
1. Mix equal parts of flour and salt.
2. Add paint to form a paste consistency.
3. Pour paint mixture into plastic squeeze bottle.
4. Squeeze paint onto the posterboard or matte board to make designs.
5. Dry the completed project. The salt gives the designs a glistening crystal quality when dry.

Hints:
- Different colors of paint mixtures will not mix together when colors bump into each other. They maintain their own separate design and space, which is different from regular paints.
- Paint mixture can dry and harden in squeeze bottles so rinse bottles clean when project is complete.

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Monoprint
(all ages)
prep=easy
some help
painting

Materials
washable table
powdered tempera paint (or liquid)
liquid starch
spoon
paintbrush
paper
newspaper covered drying area

Art Process
1. Pour a puddle of liquid starch in the artistĘs work space.
2. Add a spoonful of powdered tempera paint to the puddle.
3. Mix the starch and paint with hands or a paintbrush, spreading it out on the table to a size that will fit the piece of paper.
4. Draw a design in the paint using the fingers.
5. When the design is complete, gently place the sheet of paper over the design and pat without pressing too hard.
6. Lift the paper from the design by the corner, peeling it away from the paint.
7. A monoprint of the design will be on the paper. Place the paper on some newspaper to dry.
8. Additional prints may be made from the same design or a new design can be made and printed.

Variations
- Add more than one color or paint to the puddle of starch and experiment with combinations of colors and mixing colors.
- Instead of painting on the table top, paint on a sheet of Plexiglas or on a cookie sheet.
- If the paint on the table dries out, add more starch to make it smooth and ready again.
- Curled, dry paintings can be ironed to flatten.

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Dip and Dye Papers
(all ages)
prep=moderate
help
painting

Materials
one of the following papers:
coffee filters, paper towels, napkins, ink blotter or white tissue paper
covered table
sheets of newsprint
cups of food coloring or paper dye
eyedroppers
drying area

Art Process
1. Cover a table with thick layers of newspaper.
2. Place sheets of newsprint around the table like placemats where each artist will work.
3. There are several techniques in Dip and Dye. The easiest one is to first place a paper towel on the newsprint and then squeeze drops of food coloring or paper dye onto the paper towel. Another technique is to fold the paper towel and then dip the corners of the towel into the cups of dye. Unfold carefully and place the towel on the sheet of newsprint. A coffee filter is perhaps the best paper to fold and dip in the cups of dye.
4. Experiment with dipping and dying any of the papers suggested.
5. Carry the wet dyed towel or paper on the sheet of newsprint to a drying area and dry for an hour or so. If dying a thin paper such as white tissue, unfold the wet dyed paper as far as possible without tearing and dry overnight. Finish unfolding the dry paper the next day. When completely dry, iron the paper with adult help if necessary.

Variation
- Place the dyed papers in the window, mount on posterboard, bunch into a flower shape, cut into collage material or use for wrapping paper.
- Young artists tend to over-soak their first attempts with dying paper. Demonstrate how to dip the paper into the dye very briefly and then watch the paper absorb the color.
Hints:
- Paper dyes are available at art stores in jars of highly concentrated powdered dyes. Although fairly expensive, the dyes will last for years and the colors are incredibly bright and vibrant. In the long run, the powdered dyes are cheaper and better than food coloring.

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Collage
(all ages)
prep=moderate
collage

Materials
any collage items (see suggestions below)
white glue in a squeeze bottle or white glue thinned with water in a cup with a paintbrush
materials for a base such as paper, wood, cardboard, an old file folder, matte board, a paper plate, a
styrofoam tray or box

Art Process
1. Using glue, stick any collage items to a chosen base.
2. Any design and any amount or type of collage items makes each collage unique.
3. Dry the project completely, sometimes overnight, if the glue is very thick.

Variations
- A group can work on a collage together with everyone participating on a large base.
- Choose a theme for a collage such as shapes, colors, plants, happiness, good foods or textures.
- The following is a small list of collage suggestions:
acorns, aluminum foil, bark, beads, bobby pins, bolts, bones, bottle caps,
candy wrappers, cellophane, confetti, cork, cotton, sawdust, shells, stars,
sticks, string, eggshells, embroidery thread, fabric, feathers, felt, flowers,
gift wrap, glitter, hair rollers, hooks, ice cream sticks, inner tube scraps,
jewelry, junk, keys, lace, meat trays, moss, newspapers, origami paper,
paper dots, pebbles, pine cones, cotton swabs, ribbons, rocks,
telephone wire, tiles, toothpicks, vermiculite, wallpaper,
wood scraps, wood shavings, wooden beads, yarn or zippers.

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Lace and Sew
(all ages)
prep=moderate
craft

Materials
matte board or cardboard cut in squares
scissors
pre-cut lengths of colored yarn (about 2Ę long)
masking tape

Art Process 1--Lace and Wrap
1. Cut slits around the edge of a cardboard or matte board square.
2. Pull the end of a string of yarn through a slit and then wrap the yarn through another slit, crisscrossing the cardboard square as desired.
3. Finish the lacing by tucking the end of yarn through a slit and trimming.

Art Process 2-- Needleless Sewing
1. Punch holes around the edge of a piece of cardboard or a styrofoam tray.
2. Tape the end of a piece of yarn with enough masking tape to secure the end of yarn and make a needle-like end.
3. Push the taped end of the yarn through a hole, pull through and then push the yarn through the next hole. Continue sewing with the yarn until it runs out. Tape the end down.
4. You may sew in more yarn if you wish.

Variations
- Color in the shapes between the yarn with felt pens.
- Use embroidery thread instead of yarn.
Hint:
- Keep the yarn no longer than two feet in length. If using one of the large plastic darning needles, thread the needle with a doubled four foot length of yarn, tie both ends in a knot and begin sewing.


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Wood Sculpture
(all ages)
prep=moderate
construction

Materials
scraps of wood (see hints below)
matte board cardboard or square of wood for base, optional
white glue
decorating items such as:
tempera paint, glitter, confetti, ribbon, nails, felt pens, nuts and bolts,
pieces of straws, pieces of old toys, rubber bands or bits of collage materials

Art Process
1. Collect scraps of wood from a high school shop class or a picture frame shop.
2. Work on a base of matte board or a square of wood if desired.
3. Glue pieces of scrap wood together much like building with blocks. (For quicker and stronger sculptures, an adult can handle a glue gun for the artist. This technique must be supervised closely.)
4. Let the sculpture dry overnight.
5. When dry, the artist may choose to further decorate or paint the sculpture.

Variations
Build a specific object such as a house, bridge or car.
- Combine several sculptures with identical bases to make a large sculpture.
- Sculptures can be displayed on a wall.

Hints:
- If a sculpture is top heavy or unbalanced, white glue won't hold well. Add some masking tape, rubber bands or other supports until the glue has set. Remove the supports when the project is completely dry.
- Interesting wood scraps come from picture frame stores. Bring them a box to save pieces for you. Gold or velvet pieces are especially popular.
- Wood shop classes using jig-saws can save curved, puzzle-like and unusually shaped pieces that are creative treasures when making wood sculptures.

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FALL Branch Weaving
(5+)
prep=moderate
help
craft

Materials:
tree branch with at least three smaller branches shooting out
yarn in many colors and textures
wool
nature items such as long grasses, weeds, feathers or corn husks
strips of fabric, ribbon and other strings or cords
scissors

Art Process:
1. helps the artist start at the top or the bottom of one small branch by looping some yarn around the branch to get the project started.
2. Wrap yarn around smaller branches to make a base of yarn moving up or down the branches.
3. Weave other yarn, wool, grasses, fabric strips or any intriguing items into the yarn base. Random weaving and wrapping is also effective.
4. Wrap and weave until the branch weaving is complete.

Variation:
- Nail or glue strips of thin wood into a frame or box shape. Wrap and weave yarns on the wood base.

Hint
- Keep the yarn about two feet in length so it doesnĘt get out of control. When the yarn is too short it can be frustrating and when it is too long it gets tangled. More yarn can always be added as each piece is used up.

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Fall: Sponge Chalk
(all ages)
Materials
large, flat wet sponge
colored chalk
paper

Art Process:
1. Draw freely on the wet sponge with chalk.
2. Press the sponge onto paper to transfer a print of sponge design to the paper.

Variation:
- Grind, crush or grate chalk into a dish. Dip pieces of wet sponge into the chalk and dab them on the paper.
Hint
- Chalk breaks often which is perfectly chalk-like. Just use the small pieces until they are too small to hold. Save the tiny pieces to grind or crush into powder for other art projects.

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FALL: Shoe Polish Leaves
(4+)
prep=easy
painting

Materials:
supple autumn leaves
shoe polish in bottle with applicator (variety of colors)
variety of papers
covered work surface
extra sheets of newsprint
bucket of soapy water
nail brush
towel

Art Process:
1. Collect fresh autumn leaves in a variety of shapes and sizes.
2. Place a leaf on a piece of newsprint, face side down.
3. Dab shoe polish over the back surface of the leaf.
4. Select a piece of paper and lay it gently on the shoe polished leaf. Press and pat the paper gently over the leaf.
5. Peel the paper and leaf apart revealing a shoe polish leaf print on the paper.
6. Select another leaf, change polish colors or change make a print on a new sheet of newsprint.

Variations:
- Place a leaf on a sheet of paper. Dab shoe polish around the edges of the leaf, brushing out from the edges onto the paper. Remove the leaf and a stencil design will be left.
- Experiment with patterns and designs, types of paper and colors of shoe polish.

Hints
- Shoe polish stains hands and fingernails. Have a soapy bucket of water close by with nail brush and towel for clean up.
- Shoe polish leaf prints show the veins and features of leaves in detail.

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FALL: Dot Dots
(4+)
prep=easy
drawing

Materials:
any drawing or coloring tools such as crayons, felt pens, paints and brushes, chalk, oil pastels or
colored pencils paper

Art Process:
1. Create an entire drawing or design using only dots of color.
2. Change colors as desired.
3. Combine different art media such as using crayon dots for part of the design and paint dots for the background.

Variations
- Use contrasting colors such as green dots on red paper or yellow dots on green paper.
- Pointillism is a technique of making paintings using nothing but dots to create a larger picture. This technique can easily be explored by young artists.

Hint
- Look through a magnifying glass at the Sunday comics, coloring books in color or comic books and see how dots make up the entire picture. Young artists can usually understand the approach of Dot Dots drawing after looking through the magnifying glass or looking at the work of pointillism artists such as Seurat.

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WINTER: Peeled Glue
(4+)
prep=easy
help
drawing

Materials
bottle of white glue
wax paper
felt pens
thread or yarn
newspaper to cover table

Art Process
1. Make a design with the bottle of white glue on a piece of wax paper. Make thick masses, shapes or forms.
2. Dry the glue until hard and clear.
3. Decorate the dry glue shapes with felt pens.
4. Carefully peel the dry, decorated glue shapes off the wax paper.
5. The shapes can be laced with thread or yarn and hung from the ceiling, worn as jewelry or used as holiday decorations.

Variations
- Mix tempera paint into the glue for a colored glue. Sprinkle glitter or salt on the glue before it dries for a sparkling effect.
Hints:
- Peeling the glue takes some patience and coordination so an adult may wish to help with this step.
- It may take several days until the glue dries clear and hard, depending on weather conditions.

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WINTER: Tissue Contact
(3+)
prep=easy
[author's favorite]
collage

Materials
clear contact paper
art tissue, variety of colors
scissors
hole punch
yarn
optional collage items such as bits of lace, thread, confetti, glitter or hole punches

Art Process
1. Cut a rectangle of clear contact paper about six by twelve inches or any other size.
2. Fold the rectangle in half. Peel the backing half way off the back, stopping at the fold.
3. Lay the clear side of the clear contact paper on the table, sticky side up. 4. Using any little torn or cut pieces of art tissue, attach them to the sticky contact paper. No glue is necessary. Holiday shapes such as hearts or flowers can also be used.
5. When a design is complete, pull the remainder of the contact paper backing off.
6. Fold over the remaining contact paper and stick it to the design.
7. Take scissors and trim the ragged edges.
8. If desired, punch a hole in the top of the design, add a piece of yarn and hang the artwork in a window or near a light source.

Variation
- Cut the finished contact paper design into a heart shape for a pretty Valentine.

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Claydoh Beads
(4+)
prep=moderate
help
clay

Materials
3/4 cup flour
1/2 cup cornstarch
1/2 cup salt
powdered tempera or food paste coloring for color
3/8 cup warm water
bowl
toothpicks string, yarn or leather strings
clear gloss enamel, optional

Art Process
1. Mix flour, cornstarch and salt in a bowl. (Add powdered tempera or Edicol for colored dough.)
2. Add warm water slowly until mixture can be kneaded into a stiff dough.
3. Add flour to reduce stickiness if necessary.
4. Roll dough into balls for beads.
5. Poke a hole in each ball with a toothpick and dry for a few days. (Large beads take longer to dry.)
6. Paint if desired.
7. Adult coats the beads with a clear gloss enamel if desired.
8. When the beads are dry, string them on yarn, string or leather strips. You may tie knots in between each bead.

Hints:
- To dry beads, stick toothpicks into a ball of playdough. Place one bead on each toothpick. Twist beads on toothpicks during the drying time to be sure they don't stick to the toothpicks.
- This recipe makes a fairly smooth dough that keeps its color when dry. A bit of salt residue shows in the beads, especially in darker colored doughs.
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................................
MaryAnn F. Kohl (WA)
maryann
http://www.brightring.com