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Lesson Plans


Fwd: Something for Getty

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
RWilk85411
Tue, 3 Aug 1999 19:46:21 EDT


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In a message dated 7/19/99 11:32:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time, TAH1916 writes:

<< PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT REPORTS

NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
Office of the Executive Director
Phone 703-860-8000 Fax 703-860-2960
E-mail: naea


***What Teachers Should Expect From Staff Development.
Source: Dennis Sparks, Executive Director, National Staff Development
Council, Education Week, June 23, 1999.

Teachers and parents understand intuitively that quality teaching makes a
significant difference in student learning. But only recently are educators
and the public learning more about the kind of on-the-job learning that
enables teachers to be more effective in raising student performance.

Following is a set of guidelines that teachers can use to determine whether
their staff development program has the potential to produce instructional
changes that will cause all students to learn at high levels. NSDC believes
staff development programs should:

* Deepen teachers' knowledge of the content they teach. Deeper
understanding of academic content and its application in real-world settings
requires sustained, intellectually rigorous study. While occasional
awareness sessions about content standards or after-school make-and-take
workshops may have their place as part of a comprehensive staff development
plan, they alone are insufficient.

* Expand teachers' repertoire of research-based instructional skills to
teach that content. Some strategies are more effective than others in
particular subject areas. It is critical that teachers be taught using
methods that are consistent with those they will be expected to use in their
classrooms. They will also need "at-the-elbow" assistance to implement many
new instructional strategies. This assistance can come from other teachers,
trainers, or the school's principal.

* Create regular opportunities for serious collaborative work. Quality
staff development programs have at their core a small team of teachers who
plan lessons together, critique student work, and assist in problem solving.
These teams should meet for an hour or more several times a week, with team
members sharing responsibility for their students' learning.

* Develop classroom assessment skills that allow teachers to regularly
monitor gains in student learning resulting from improved classroom
practices. Teachers need efficient, practical ways to monitor daily and
weekly improvements in student learning. Not only will the acquisition of
these assessment skills improve teaching, they also will enable teachers and
staff development leaders to determine the effectiveness of their efforts.

* Encourage innovation, experimentation, and the collegial sharing of new
ideas and practices that support teacher learning. Because school cultures
exert a powerful force on performance, teachers must be surrounded by norms,
symbols, and stories that support high expectations and create an environment
in which continuous involvement thrives. School calendars and schedules,
labor contracts, incentive systems, and other structural elements must also
support continuous learning for all teachers.

* Connect teachers to other professionals within and beyond their schools
and to outside sources of knowledge and skill. Teacher networks,
face-to-face and electronic, can serve as important sources of information,
materials, and support. Networks enable teachers to connect to the latest
research and advances in their fields and to have interpersonal connections
that enrich their work.


**State Councils to Seek Better In-Service Teacher Training
Source: Education Daily, June 14, 1999 (National Staff Development Council)

Nationally, in-service training programs at schools are often criticized for
using "one shot" or "drive by" workshops that amount to teacher pep rallies
and don't focus on skills and strategies needed to improve instruction.

Another frequently cited problem with staff development programs, the NSDC
report said, is that while teachers often must take continuing education
courses to remain certified, those courses are not always connected to their
subject area. "There's a plethora of learning opportunities out there," the
report stated, "and people can choose what interests them instead of what is
connected to learning."

All 10 state NSDC councils have had some success so far. For example,
NSDC's Texas council worked with state officials in engineering a teacher
recertification system that provides incentives for teachers to participate
in training that improves their knowledge and skills rather than just offer
"an accumulation of hours."

And in Illinois, teachers will soon be required to complete 120 hours of
training over five years to keep their licenses, but the NSDC affiliate and
business interests successfully campaigned to tie training to the state's
teaching and learning standards.


###

Circulated as a Public Service by NAEA

>>

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From: TAH1916
Full-name: TAH1916
Message-ID: <744a2106.24c547b7>
Date: Mon, 19 Jul 1999 23:32:07 EDT
Subject: Something for Getty
To: RWilk85411
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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT REPORTS

NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
Office of the Executive Director
Phone 703-860-8000 Fax 703-860-2960
E-mail: naea

***What Teachers Should Expect From Staff Development.
Source: Dennis Sparks, Executive Director, National Staff Development
Council, Education Week, June 23, 1999.

Teachers and parents understand intuitively that quality teaching makes a
significant difference in student learning. But only recently are educators
and the public learning more about the kind of on-the-job learning that
enables teachers to be more effective in raising student performance.

Following is a set of guidelines that teachers can use to determine whether
their staff development program has the potential to produce instructional
changes that will cause all students to learn at high levels. NSDC believes
staff development programs should:

* Deepen teachers' knowledge of the content they teach. Deeper
understanding of academic content and its application in real-world settings
requires sustained, intellectually rigorous study. While occasional
awareness sessions about content standards or after-school make-and-take
workshops may have their place as part of a comprehensive staff development
plan, they alone are insufficient.

* Expand teachers' repertoire of research-based instructional skills to
teach that content. Some strategies are more effective than others in
particular subject areas. It is critical that teachers be taught using
methods that are consistent with those they will be expected to use in their
classrooms. They will also need "at-the-elbow" assistance to implement many
new instructional strategies. This assistance can come from other teachers,
trainers, or the school's principal.

* Create regular opportunities for serious collaborative work. Quality
staff development programs have at their core a small team of teachers who
plan lessons together, critique student work, and assist in problem solving.
These teams should meet for an hour or more several times a week, with team
members sharing responsibility for their students' learning.

* Develop classroom assessment skills that allow teachers to regularly
monitor gains in student learning resulting from improved classroom
practices. Teachers need efficient, practical ways to monitor daily and
weekly improvements in student learning. Not only will the acquisition of
these assessment skills improve teaching, they also will enable teachers and
staff development leaders to determine the effectiveness of their efforts.

* Encourage innovation, experimentation, and the collegial sharing of new
ideas and practices that support teacher learning. Because school cultures
exert a powerful force on performance, teachers must be surrounded by norms,
symbols, and stories that support high expectations and create an environment
in which continuous involvement thrives. School calendars and schedules,
labor contracts, incentive systems, and other structural elements must also
support continuous learning for all teachers.

* Connect teachers to other professionals within and beyond their schools
and to outside sources of knowledge and skill. Teacher networks,
face-to-face and electronic, can serve as important sources of information,
materials, and support. Networks enable teachers to connect to the latest
research and advances in their fields and to have interpersonal connections
that enrich their work.

**State Councils to Seek Better In-Service Teacher Training
Source: Education Daily, June 14, 1999 (National Staff Development Council)

Nationally, in-service training programs at schools are often criticized for
using "one shot" or "drive by" workshops that amount to teacher pep rallies
and don't focus on skills and strategies needed to improve instruction.

Another frequently cited problem with staff development programs, the NSDC
report said, is that while teachers often must take continuing education
courses to remain certified, those courses are not always connected to their
subject area. "There's a plethora of learning opportunities out there," the
report stated, "and people can choose what interests them instead of what is
connected to learning."

All 10 state NSDC councils have had some success so far. For example, NSDC's
Texas council worked with state officials in engineering a teacher
recertification system that provides incentives for teachers to participate
in training that improves their knowledge and skills rather than just offer
"an accumulation of hours."

And in Illinois, teachers will soon be required to complete 120 hours of
training over five years to keep their licenses, but the NSDC affiliate and
business interests successfully campaigned to tie training to the state's
teaching and learning standards.

###

Circulated as a Public Service by NAEA

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