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Lesson Plans


the matter of art education

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Litesal (Litesal)
Mon, 3 Aug 1998 10:58:28 -0400


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-----Original Message-----
From: Litesal <Litesal>
To: robprod <robprod>; =
artsednet.edu <artsednet.edu>
Date: Wednesday, July 29, 1998 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: VISUAL ARTS IN A NEW KEY!
=20
=20
=20
Dear Colleagues,=20

The next paragraph is my response to Robert Beeching regarding =
the importance of providing an art foundation to our students. I don't =
remember seeing it on the list. I am including it in this letter, =
because I get the feeling that I may have communicated that I support =
using art class for a place to create decorations. I do not, in fact, I =
find the notion disturbing. Following that, are a few more comments =
about why I want some suggestions for holiday art.

Response to Robert:

Well said, I agree with you 100 percent! So many people think =
art skills are a "gift" you are born with, not something you can learn, =
practice, and improve upon. That word "gift" bothers me, it's as if it =
took no effort for me to acquire my skills. Furthermore, it implies =
that teaching art is unnecessary since "you have it, or you don't." I =
try to dispel that myth daily. "I'm not good at art," is the lament I =
hear often from my students (at first). I, of course, tell them that's =
why they are in my class, to get better! I prove to them as often as =
possible, that other students who are, "good at art," actually practice =
constantly and that is what makes them skilled.

I requested some good, art educationally sound, foundation =
providing holiday art lessons, because I know that they are possible. =
Because of my bias against them, I have trouble planning them. However, =
I also realize that holidays are an important part of an elementary =
student's (and our) life experience. Therefore, I don't feel I'm =
selling out by facilitating art experiences that draw from that subject =
matter, as long as they meet the criteria of legitimate art creation or =
skills building (not monkey-see-monkey-do, as Reatha would say). So =
far, I've gotten some good ideas. I will share them in another post if =
requested (most of the ideas I received were also on the list).=20

In addition, I wanted to say that I also agree that craft does =
not equal non-art. The line between fine arts and crafts is almost =
non-existent today. However, the definition of a craft seems to include =
that pre-made, just assemble variety, the kind that takes no original =
thought (this is the definition many students and teachers have). It is =
important that we let people know that is not art (because many think it =
is!).

Sincerely, Leah

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-----Original = Message-----
From:=20 Litesal <Litesal>
To:=20 robprod <robprod>; = artsednet.edu= =20 <artsednet.edu= >
Date:=20 Wednesday, July 29, 1998 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: VISUAL = ARTS IN A=20 NEW KEY!

 

Dear Colleagues,=20

The next paragraph is my response to Robert = Beeching=20 regarding the importance of providing an art foundation to our=20 students.  I don't remember seeing it on the list.  I = am=20 including it in this letter, because I get the feeling that I = may have=20 communicated that I support using art class for a place to = create=20 decorations.  I do not, in fact, I find the notion=20 disturbing.  Following that, are a few more comments about = why I=20 want some suggestions for holiday art.

Response to Robert:

Well said, I agree with you 100 = percent!  So=20 many people think art skills are a "gift" you are born = with,  not something you can learn, practice, and improve=20 upon.  That word "gift" bothers me, it's as if it = took no=20 effort for me to acquire my skills.  Furthermore, it = implies that=20 teaching art is unnecessary since "you have it, or you=20 don't."    I try to dispel that myth = daily. =20 "I'm not good at art," is the lament I hear often from = my=20 students (at first).  I, of course, tell them that's why = they are=20 in my class, to get better!  I prove to them as often as = possible,=20 that other students who are, "good at art," actually = practice=20 constantly and that is what makes them skilled.

I requested some good, art educationally sound, foundation = providing=20 holiday art lessons, because I know that they are = possible. =20 Because of my bias against them, I have trouble planning = them. =20 However, I also realize that holidays are an important part of = an=20 elementary student's (and our) life experience.  = Therefore,  I=20 don't feel I'm selling out by facilitating art experiences that = draw=20 from that subject matter, as long as they meet the criteria of=20 legitimate art creation or skills building (not = monkey-see-monkey-do, as=20 Reatha would say).  So far, I've gotten some good = ideas.  I=20 will share them in another post if requested (most of the ideas = I=20 received were also on the list).

In addition, I wanted to say that I also agree that craft = does not=20 equal non-art.  The line between fine arts and crafts is = almost=20 non-existent today.  However, the definition of a craft = seems to=20 include that pre-made, just assemble variety,  the kind = that takes=20 no original thought (this is the definition many students and = teachers=20 have).  It is important that we let people know that is not = art=20 (because many think it is!).

Sincerely,=20 Leah

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