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Lesson Plans


Re: What art is

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Barbara Bridges (maine)
Sun, 25 Aug 1996 08:42:41 -0500 (CDT)


Dear Craig,
I downloaded your questions, they were excellent!On Mon, 22 Jul 1996, craig
roland wrote:

> Having followed with interest the thread begun with McSwain's posting, I
> thought I'd make a contribution to the dialogue:
>
> Most recently, Bob Fromme wrote:
>
> ....(parts deleted)
>
> >I include Quigley's remark because the varied e-mail exchange about the
> >merits >(and lack of merit) concerning certain art in contemporary museums
> >illuminates >the diversity in cognitive systems among our members. As each
> >of us come to >evaluate art works, we can not escape the system of belief
> >which each of us as individuals hold as "the truth". That truth varies
> >according to our group, the situations of our upbringing, our education,
> >and our unique personal experiences with the creative experience , etc..
>
> ....(parts deleted)
>
> I agree with this assertion and feel that teaching students (particularly
> older students and adults) about "what art is" is as much a matter or
> making them aware of what they themselves think "art is" or is suppose to
> be.
>
> I also feel we shouldn't confuse the question of "what is art?" with the
> question of "what is good art?"
>
> I work with college students--both majors and non-majors. While I find
> that both of these groups share similar value systems regarding art (e.g.,
> a preference for realism) the latter group requires more background
> information in order to bring them "up to speed" with respect to
> contemporary art.
>
> I thought I'd include a few resources in my posting that I use in my
> classes when taking about the nature of art and more specifically
> contemporary art. So that it doesn't become too long, I'll be breaking this
> posting into two parts.
>
> <Part One>
>
> I have my students complete the following survey before talking about
> issues related to the nature of art and making judgments about it. The
> purpose of the survey is to bring to the surface some of the belief systems
> students hold with respect to art:
>
>
> What makes art valuable to you?
>
> In your opinion, what is the most valuable thing about a work of art?
> Number each of the following qualities from 1 to 5 to indicate their
> importance to you.
>
> (1=very important and 5=no importance.)
>
> ___ The time the artist spent working on it.
>
> ___ The skill of the artist.
>
> ___ How realistic it is.
>
> ___ How "eye-catching" it is.
>
> ___ The feelings or emotions it gives me.
>
> ___ How (or if) it makes me think about the world in some new way.
>
> ___ How original or different it is from other works I've seen.
>
> ___ The beauty of the subject depicted.
>
> ___ How much it sells for.
>
> ___ The name of the artist.
>
> ___ Other. (Please describe: _________________________.)
>
> Part 2 to follow.
>
> Craig
>
> ______________________________________________________________________________
> CRAIG ROLAND. Associate Professor-Art Education.
> University of Florida. Department of Art. Gainesville Florida. 32611-5801.
> (352) 392-9165 - Art Ed Office (352) 392-8453 - Fax
>
> * visit my homepage at <http://grove.ufl.edu/~rolandc/homepage.html> *
>
>
>
>