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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: August 18, 2011

---------

From: Daniel Murren (djmurren_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Aug 19 2011 - 07:20:40 PDT


I like the doodling idea for middle school. The Kleenex box is a great
idea. Would you cover it with drawing paper? Perhaps, cut paper to the
size needed, doodle and then glue onto to the box.

Does anyone have any suggestions of music to play in the art room with
middle school?
Sue

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Friday, August 19, 2011 3:03 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: August 18, 2011

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, August 18, 2011.

1. New Job Jitters
2. Doodle lesson
3. Re: Doodle lesson
4. RE: Doodle lesson
5. Re: Doodle lesson
6. Re: New Job Jitters
7. Re: Doodle lesson
8. SITES DE EDUCATION PROGRAMS on WEB - Art Educators k-12
9. doodling on 3D object
10. Re: doodling on 3D object

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New Job Jitters
From: sarah k <sarah.kerns3@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 12:47:57 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

After working at a small, private, Catholic, elementary and middle
school for three years, I am starting in September at one of the five
public middle schools in my city! I am super excited as I have been
trying to get my foot in the door for years, and am really thankful
for this opportunity to keep growing as a teacher.

I will be transitioning from about 250 kids, grades 2-8, to upwards of
600 middle school aged kids. I'm nervous to say the least. I know I
have been hired because I (appear to) know what I am doing, but with
no curriculum in place to follow, just the MA state frameworks as
guidelines (which I've basically taught to in the past) I have to
start from scratch again and I'm a little overwhelmed. Aside from an
introductory name design or mandala, I need to start organizing some
units and/or lessons and nail down what supplies I have to work with.

Does anyone have any advice for organizing a middle school curriculum?
What materials (and brands) are a must have for a successful program?
More over, does anyone have any advice for a first year, part time,
middle school art teacher (whose going back to school part time
herself)?

You can find some of my lessons, and some other experiences, on my
blog: http://chucksandcrayons.blogspot.com/

Thank you, as always, for your guidance and advice! Feel free to email
me off the list as well.

Sarah Kerns
Art
Broad Meadows Middle School
Quincy, MA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Doodle lesson
From: Katherine Purdy <kjp1627@lausd.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 10:14:09 -0700
X-Message-Number: 2

Hello everyone-

I teach middle school and usually begin the year with a doodle project
to ease my students fears about drawing....
This year, instead of creating doodles in their sketchbooks, I'd like
to get them doodling on some "thing"-like a 3-D
object, but it has to be something we can make, costs little money or
is from the recycle bin. Also it needs to be a surface
we can actually draw on and SEE our doodles. I know-tough criteria!

As you know when you TRULY doodle it is often on a piece of napkin,
or a throwaway scrap of paper- because doodling is not precious!
So my back up idea is to use napkins....but I am not sold on it yet!

So I thought I'd ask the group fpr suggestions. I also thought of
teaching kids FIRST to make a 3-D origami cube,
because I do origami early in the year as well, but that's more
difficult for some kids, and really requires me to teach origami
first instead of doodling-and I like to start EASY for everyone! If
the following tidbit helps spur your imaginations.... I got this
3-D doodling idea from a Kleenex box with amazing looking ballpoint
doodle designs on it!

Thanks,
Kathy

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Doodle lesson
From: Ann Heineman <aiheineman@prodigy.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 13:40:18 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Bonjour Kathy,
   Perhaps you can purchase some small white paper sacs in bulk then stuff
them with firm rolls of newspaper until they fill up to the dimensions of a
cube. Tape close the flaps and voilĂ , instant cube.

       Ann-on-y-mouse in Columbus
       Art Teacher K-5, retired since 2002. My work is going to be in a
group exhibit at Fort Hayes HS Shot Tower Gallery August 26- October 7.
There will be a reception on Friday, September 30, 7-9 PM. If you are in the
Central Ohio area, you are most welcome to attend!

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 18, 2011, at 13:14, Katherine Purdy <kjp1627@lausd.net> wrote:

> Hello everyone-
>
> I teach middle school and usually begin the year with a doodle project to
ease my students fears about drawing....
> This year, instead of creating doodles in their sketchbooks, I'd like to
get them doodling on some "thing"-like a 3-D
> object, but it has to be something we can make, costs little money or is
from the recycle bin. Also it needs to be a surface
> we can actually draw on and SEE our doodles. I know-tough criteria!
>
> As you know when you TRULY doodle it is often on a piece of napkin, or a
throwaway scrap of paper- because doodling is not precious!
> So my back up idea is to use napkins....but I am not sold on it yet!
>
> So I thought I'd ask the group fpr suggestions. I also thought of
teaching kids FIRST to make a 3-D origami cube,
> because I do origami early in the year as well, but that's more difficult
for some kids, and really requires me to teach origami
> first instead of doodling-and I like to start EASY for everyone! If the
following tidbit helps spur your imaginations.... I got this
> 3-D doodling idea from a Kleenex box with amazing looking ballpoint doodle
designs on it!
>
> Thanks,
> Kathy
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go
tohttp://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Doodle lesson
From: Marcia <mbhirst@aol.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 12:42:19 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

How about doodling on a styrofoam cup ? I have seen an artist somewhere on
the internet who does amazing cups.
Marcia in Illinois

-----Original Message-----
From: Katherine Purdy
Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2011 12:14 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Doodle lesson

Hello everyone-

I teach middle school and usually begin the year with a doodle project
to ease my students fears about drawing....
This year, instead of creating doodles in their sketchbooks, I'd like
to get them doodling on some "thing"-like a 3-D
object, but it has to be something we can make, costs little money or
is from the recycle bin. Also it needs to be a surface
we can actually draw on and SEE our doodles. I know-tough criteria!

As you know when you TRULY doodle it is often on a piece of napkin,
or a throwaway scrap of paper- because doodling is not precious!
So my back up idea is to use napkins....but I am not sold on it yet!

So I thought I'd ask the group fpr suggestions. I also thought of
teaching kids FIRST to make a 3-D origami cube,
because I do origami early in the year as well, but that's more
difficult for some kids, and really requires me to teach origami
first instead of doodling-and I like to start EASY for everyone! If
the following tidbit helps spur your imaginations.... I got this
3-D doodling idea from a Kleenex box with amazing looking ballpoint
doodle designs on it!

Thanks,
Kathy

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Doodle lesson
From: Natalie Sakurai <gnatsak@surewest.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 10:45:15 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5
Why not doodle on a square of paper, and then use it to create a  
simple origami?
Natalie
On Aug 18, 2011, at 10:14 AM, Katherine Purdy wrote:
> Hello everyone-
>
> I teach middle school and usually begin the year with a doodle  
> project to ease my students fears about drawing....
> This year, instead of creating doodles in their sketchbooks,  I'd  
> like to get them doodling on some "thing"-like a 3-D
> object, but it has to be something we can make, costs little money  
> or is from the recycle bin.  Also it needs to be a surface
> we can actually draw on and SEE our doodles. I know-tough criteria!
>
> As you know when you TRULY  doodle it is often on a piece of napkin,  
> or a throwaway scrap of paper- because doodling is not precious!
> So my back up idea is to use napkins....but I am not sold on it yet!
>
> So I thought I'd ask the group fpr suggestions.  I also thought of  
> teaching kids  FIRST to make a 3-D origami cube,
> because I do origami early in the year as well, but that's more  
> difficult for some kids, and really requires me to teach origami
> first instead of doodling-and I like to start EASY for everyone!  If  
> the following tidbit helps spur your imaginations.... I got this
> 3-D doodling idea from a Kleenex box with amazing looking ballpoint  
> doodle designs on it!
>
> Thanks,
> Kathy
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go
tohttp://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: New Job Jitters
From: Diane Gregory <gregory.diane55@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 11:18:17 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6
Hi Sarah,
This sounds like an elementary art teaching position I had several years
ago.  
You are correct.  The first thing to do is make an inventory of supplies, 
equipment, supply storage and storage for on going projects.
The second thing to do is to get information about the students 
themselves.  Perhaps your school principal or other teachers can give 
you professional insight about the strengths and abilities of the 
students at the school.  They can also give you dates and information 
about special occasions or functions that you may want to integrate with
your art program or be aware how it might affect your planning.
The 
third thing you need to do is create a week by week frame work that can 
fit on one or two pages for the entire year.  The framework should list 
grade level, time taught, objectives, theme, media, themes.  This 
framework is essential so that you can begin to plug in learning 
experiences for each week so that you have only two or three 
preparations as far as supplies, resources, storage.  You could create a
table using Microsoft Word to help yourself get organized.  The idea 
here is to organize your curriculum so as not to overwhelm yourself.  I 
would use no more than 2 or 3 different media each week and 
corresponding visual resources.  You can change up the assignment, but 
keep the changes in media and resources to only 2 or 3 different media 
or resources.  I would tend to divide the curriculum into 2D, 3D,and 
mixed media.  I would probably do 2D and mixed media in the fall and 3D
mixed media in the spring.
As you work through this framework, contact other teachers to see if you 
can integrate any of your lessons with theirs.  They really don't need 
to coincide at the same time.  You might just choose one or two 
disciplines to integrate during your first year.
Fourth, develop a classroom management and discipline plan that works with
your framework.  Make sure you have enough storage for supplies.  Develop a 
traffic flow pattern and if necessary rearrange the furniture to 
accommodate your framework.  Make sure you have enough storage for 
on-going projects...600 students is a lot and you will need a system to 
manage all of this. (When developing your framework, be sure to take 
this into account.  You may want to minimize or plan for projects that 
take on-going storage, if you have limited on-going space.)
Fifth, develop a support group from the community and other teachers. 
Perhaps you can ask for volunteers and make contact with community resources
and parents and of course the PTA.
Sixth, develop scoring rubrics for each project that can be carried around 
with you as you work with students in the classroom.  Part time jobs can
have a way of becoming full time jobs at part time pay if you are not 
able to do the work while at work.  I am trying out using my iPad 2 this
fall as a way to evaluate student artistic performance (process and 
product) using Pages, a great app for a number of things.  During class, I
hope to visit with most students and evaluate their work in-progress 
and completed while in class, thereby reducing my out of class workload.
There are, of course, many other things you could do, but this is enough for
starters :-)
Best of luck.
Diane
 
Go confidently in the direction of your dreams--Live the Life You've
Imagined!
Henry David Thoreau, Walden
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Associate Professor of Art Education
Director, Undergraduate & Graduate Studies in Art Education
dgregory@mail.twu.edu
----- Original Message -----
> From: sarah k <sarah.kerns3@gmail.com>
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Cc: 
> Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2011 11:47 AM
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] New Job Jitters
> 
> After working at a small, private, Catholic, elementary and middle
> school for three years, I am starting in September at one of the five
> public middle schools in my city! I am super excited as I have been
> trying to get my foot in the door for years, and am really thankful
> for this opportunity to keep growing as a teacher.
> 
> I will be transitioning from about 250 kids, grades 2-8, to upwards of
> 600 middle school aged kids. I'm nervous to say the least. I know I
> have been hired because I (appear to) know what I am doing, but with
> no curriculum in place to follow, just the MA state frameworks as
> guidelines (which I've basically taught to in the past) I have to
> start from scratch again and I'm a little overwhelmed. Aside from an
> introductory name design or mandala, I need to start organizing some
> units and/or lessons and nail down what supplies I have to work with.
> 
> Does anyone have any advice for organizing a middle school curriculum?
> What materials (and brands) are a must have for a successful program?
> More over, does anyone have any advice for a first year, part time,
> middle school art teacher (whose going back to school part time
> herself)?
> 
> You can find some of my lessons, and some other experiences, on my
> blog: http://chucksandcrayons.blogspot.com/
> 
> Thank you, as always, for your guidance and advice! Feel free to email
> me off the list as well.
> 
> Sarah Kerns
> Art
> Broad Meadows Middle School
> Quincy, MA
> 
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Doodle lesson
From: Katherine Purdy <kjp1627@lausd.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 11:33:27 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7
THANK YOU SO MUCH EVERYONE!
I especially love the styrofoam cup idea!
On Aug 18, 2011, at 10:42 AM, Marcia wrote:
> How about doodling on a styrofoam cup ? I have seen an artist  
> somewhere on the internet who does amazing cups.
> Marcia in Illinois
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Katherine Purdy
> Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2011 12:14 PM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Doodle lesson
>
> Hello everyone-
>
> I teach middle school and usually begin the year with a doodle project
> to ease my students fears about drawing....
> This year, instead of creating doodles in their sketchbooks,  I'd like
> to get them doodling on some "thing"-like a 3-D
> object, but it has to be something we can make, costs little money or
> is from the recycle bin.  Also it needs to be a surface
> we can actually draw on and SEE our doodles. I know-tough criteria!
>
> As you know when you TRULY  doodle it is often on a piece of napkin,
> or a throwaway scrap of paper- because doodling is not precious!
> So my back up idea is to use napkins....but I am not sold on it yet!
>
> So I thought I'd ask the group fpr suggestions.  I also thought of
> teaching kids  FIRST to make a 3-D origami cube,
> because I do origami early in the year as well, but that's more
> difficult for some kids, and really requires me to teach origami
> first instead of doodling-and I like to start EASY for everyone!  If
> the following tidbit helps spur your imaginations.... I got this
> 3-D doodling idea from a Kleenex box with amazing looking ballpoint
> doodle designs on it!
>
> Thanks,
> Kathy
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: SITES DE EDUCATION PROGRAMS on WEB  - Art Educators k-12
From: "Cristina Simoes" <crismatisse@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 16:10:22 -0300
X-Message-Number: 8
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Michal Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2011 9:18 AM
Subject: RE: Art Educators k-12
A few sites to get you started: 
http://www.gsn.org/programs/travelbuddies/index.html
http://projects.twice.cc/
http://cilc.org/
http://www.twice.cc/
http://www.epals.com/
By telecollaborative are you referring to using Skype or Polycom or similar
device? 
~Michal
Where can I find a list of art education organizations or individual teacher
groups that are presently involved in telecollaborativ art projects? I would
like to engage my students in something National or International; or
perhaps develop a project of my own? 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: doodling on 3D object
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 19:13:17 +0000
X-Message-Number: 9
http://www.flickr.com/photos/31239756@N04/sets/72157622448151132/
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: doodling on 3D object
From: Katherine Purdy <kjp1627@lausd.net>
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2011 12:32:57 -0700
X-Message-Number: 10
San,
Great beginning of the year activity!  I can really see my students  
working in groups to create these!  Have you made a lesson
for this that you would like to share here?
Thanks,
Kathy
On Aug 18, 2011, at 12:13 PM, San D Hasselman wrote:
>
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/31239756@N04/sets/72157622448151132/
> 	   		
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
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