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[teacherartexchange] FW: teacherartexchange digest: August 24, 2009

---------

From: Sherry Syrie (ssyrie_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Aug 26 2009 - 10:31:47 PDT


Hello everyone! I am thinking of creating a "Portfolio Pride" night for
all my quarterly art students (4 times a year) where kids bring parents
to the school to have a student-led type of conference with them about
their art portfolio, but I need some assistance coming up with ideas.
Have any of you done this sort of thing before (or something like it)?
What worked, what didn't? Did you offer extra credit for attendance?
Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks
Sherry Syrie
Middle School Visual Arts Teacher
Cheney Middle School, WA

P.S. Did I do the "reply" part right on this email Judy so you don't
get the extra spam? Hope it worked

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest [mailto:]
Sent: Tuesday, August 25, 2009 1:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: August 24, 2009

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, August 24, 2009.

1. Re: BE CAREFUL USING JUNKED COMPUTERS!!
2. Re: Re:Beyond Textbooks
3. RE: Nam June Paik idea
4. LFS model
5. RE: Lesson plan help
6. Computer parts that are safe for jewelry making
7. Re: Lesson plan help - High School
8. RE: teacherartexchange digest: August 23, 2009
9. RE: Nam June Paik idea
10. RE: Lesson plan help
11. RE: Lesson plan help - High School
12. Mini Grants for supplies
13. sketchbook project opportunity
14. Re: BE CAREFUL USING JUNKED COMPUTERS!!
15. Re: Computer parts that are safe for jewelry making

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: BE CAREFUL USING JUNKED COMPUTERS!!
From: mwhiteec@cablemodem.com.ec
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 07:31:07 -0500 (ECT)
X-Message-Number: 1

Hey, Bunk,

I thought it was common knowledge. I just Googled computer motherboard
toxic
materials and got a lot of hits. The solder used to glue things
together
contains lead. I think the actual boards are a plastic you wouldn't
want to
breathe the sawdust of unless you're wearing protection.

I've seen really cool products made just from the motherboards (my
favorite
clipboard is one), but I don't know how the bumpy things were removed
and the
material shaped. Hope you can figure this out; sounds like a really fun
lesson.

Mag

> Hi Mags. I had heard that monitors were toxic materials (which we
> weren't going to use) but the motherboard pieces and wires were okay.
> I saw and heard this on a TV show about old computers. Where did you
> get your information? Toodles.....Bunki

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Re:Beyond Textbooks
From: Gabrielle Bliss <Gabrielle.Bliss@mpls.k12.mn.us>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 08:17:38 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Minneapolis used to use it with their online classes. I taught a High
School Art History class
with it 6 years ago as additional information to augment what I taught
in class. I thought it
was cool, especially all of the links. However, Minneapolis discontinued
it because they felt
the reading level was too hard for the students. I think it would be fun
to have available but
would not require the students to do the whole thing from beginning to
end.

Gabrielle Bliss
Visual Arts
Thomas Edison High School
700 22nd Ave NE
Minneapolis, MN 55418

----- Original Message -----
From: Hawkholt@aol.com
Date: Sunday, August 23, 2009 10:44 am
Subject: Re:[teacherartexchange] Beyond Textbooks

> Anyone have any experience with this program? We are going to be
> instituting it in our district and wonder how this works with an
> art program.
> Seems like we art teachers are beyond textbooks all the time, but
> I don't know
> anything about it yet. No explorative teachers were included in
> the
> preliminary meeting, but that's not unusual. Genie Holt
>
>
> **************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in
> just 2 easy
> steps!
> (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1222846709x1201493018/aol?
redir=http://www.freecreditreport.com/pm/default.aspx?sc=668072&hmpgID=1
15&bcd
> =JulystepsfooterNO115)
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Nam June Paik idea
From: Carrie Maras <carrie.maras@cincyart.org>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 09:29:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Hello Everyone!

I'm writing from the Cincinnati art Museum, where we have a Nam June
Paik as a part of our collection. We have used for many different ideas
and lessons. I'll include a link to our most recent program featuring
the piece http://www.happeninc.com/blog/LASTING-MPRESSIONS

If you're interested in using an image of our piece, let me know and
I'll send you one for educational purposes (it is copyright restricted.)
thanks - and good luck!
Carrie

Assistant Curator for Community Engagement
Cincinnati Art Museum
513.639.2342
carrie.maras@cincyart.org

-----Original Message-----
From: Bunki Kramer [mailto:bkramer@srvusd.net]
Sent: Sunday, August 23, 2009 12:42 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Nam June Paik idea

HI. I haven't used Nam June Paik as an artist motivator but then I'm
not familiar with this artist and had to look the name up on google. I
do have an idea for you. In fact, I was thinking of doing something
like this for the coming year. I went to our district warehouse this
summer to see if they had some old surplus file cabinets and book
shelf (which I could spray paint for my room) . While there, they had
stacks and stack of old surplus computers going to the dump. I
confiscated a couple to take apart for the insides. Years ago when I
went to an NAEA convention workshop, a college teacher had done the
same thing and had his students make wearable jewelry with the wires,
mother boards, etc. All you would basically need are the parts, wire
cutters, and "nail glue" from the hardware store. Think of the
exciting adventure and brain rush of finally taking apart one of those
contraptions that seems to be taking over the entire whole. I need to
check into the safety factors first though.

Here is northern CA we had RAFT...Resource Area For Teachers...which
many companies donate to and offers junk, unused items, machine parts
for pennies on the dollar. I go there once a year to "shop" and get
wire, sponge parts, office machinery parts, paper, ribbons, plastics,
you-name-it. Most states have such places. You should check into
recycling areas around you. Freecycle.org is a good start. I put in
Boston, Mass. and a lot of good stuff came up. Google for places near
you. There's places out there...especially around a big city like
Boston. Toodles......Bunki

************************
On Aug 21, 2009, at 5:48 PM, bmarder@somerville.mec.edu wrote:

> Hi Bunki,
>
> I have been following you for some time-you have such great ideas.
>
> Have you used Nam June Paik as a motivating artist for art/video/
> technology lesson
> plans? I have middle schoolers in mind.
>
> I am giving this so much thought and looking for feedback.
>
> Thanks,
> Barbara from Boston
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go
tohttp://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: LFS model
From: donnalyn shuster <d_shuster@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 06:57:30 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4
We are picking up more training this fall in our school using the
Learner Focused model. It IS geared for academic areas....forget finding
anything written example wise for art.( At least I have not seen
anything....)  I agree with Jerry - just another sales package. In 29
years I have seen it all come and go.....I do like the idea of the
essential question...the rest of it seems to be just variations on the
old standby I learned in college years ago. 
I do use rubrics and checklists for grading and ALWAYS have students
write a reflective statement.That is what works for me. Good luck.
Donnalyn in NYT
      
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Lesson plan help
From: "Pokojski, Kelly" <Kelly-Pokojski@cdolinc.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 09:13:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5
Will this be only high school or also middle or elementary?
|Any idea of cost or subscription?
Thanks for all the effort, any and all ideas are so welcome, especially
for us that are relatively new.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Computer parts that are safe for jewelry making
From: Judy Decker <jdecker4art@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 10:26:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6
Greetings Getty Folks,
I know some computer parts are safe for jewelry making. I had a pin
and earrings made from Friendly Plastic and computer parts (maybe
memory sticks? - just small squares of the green board). I never got
around to experimenting myself (or researching what was safe) so never
did the project with my students. Wish I had known a couple months ago
- I could have sent them to Bunki! I never wore them. I sold them at
our church garage sale for $5.00 for the set (a super bargain!).
I just Googled - computer parts that are safe to use in jewelry making
- and got a lot of hits.
I also Googled - computer memory used for jewelry -
and got some hits.
Happy surfing!
Judy
Note: If you post a reply to this - please delete my email address. So
are, your efforts are working to reduce Spam on this account. I
appreciate all you are doing. I think I have only seen a couple of
people posted this address so far.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Lesson plan help - High School
From: Judy Decker <jdecker4art@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 10:35:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7
Greetings Kelly - and all,
Ken Schwab's lessons are for high school - BUT many have adapted them
to Middle School. It just depends on your students. You will find an
assortment of lessons by Ken Schwab on Incredible Art Department Web
site (use the Google search feature to find Ken Schwab - be sure
search the site is selected - not search the web).
Anyone interested in getting  'taste" of what Ken's lessons are like
should take a look at Incredible Art Department now. Once his site
becomes active, Ken's FREE lessons will be removed and replaced with
links to his site. Only the student images and lesson summary will
remain. Ken did not request this - I told him this is my plan and he
agreed to it.
Regards,
Judy Decker
P.S. Just a reminder top remove my email address if you post a reply.
Your efforts to reduce Spam are greatly appreciated.
On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 10:13 AM, Pokojski, Kelly wrote:
> Will this be only high school or also middle or elementary?
> |Any idea of cost or subscription?
> Thanks for all the effort, any and all ideas are so welcome,
especially
> for us that are relatively new.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: August 23, 2009
From: Pam Wellington <loveart@hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 10:37:05 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8
Dear Dana,Our school district here in PA has adopted Learning Focused
strategies. We MUST use the lesson plan template, the "Essential
Question" and the vocabulary lists. I have been a high school art
educator for 15 years. Bottom line, Learning Focus is old strategies
re-packaged and sold to us in a great big spiral wirebound book. There
is truly nothing new here. Unless you consider posting vocabulary words,
forming your objective for the day as a question instead of a statement,
and fitting your objectives and activity descriptions and assessment
rubrics into little blocks and squares innovative. Sorry to sound
skeptical but I have been around this block a few times now and there
seems to be an attitude that truly new and innovative ideas, which have
research and success documented, do not get implemented. Example:
smaller classrooms.  Instead, they are easy  marks for marketing
strategies by state boards who sell us on so-called new ideas, which are
really new wine in ol!
 d wine skins. So what I do is make a vocab list and post it, form my
objectives into questions and post them, and reformat my lesson plans to
fit into the template provided and I am a learning focus teacher. Don't
get me wrong, that's not all there is to it. Entrance and exit
strategies, all sorts of non-innovative ideas which have been around for
decades, if not longer, are also re-packaged for us. What I find a
little disturbing about this trend is that it makes claims for improving
learning that it can't possibly deliver. For me,it is ludicrous to
expect a vocabulary list and a question posted on the board to
completely transform educational success for at-risk students. The only
thing that will do that is 1. exceptional teachers who truly care deeply
about their students, and 2. actually implementing of truly innovative
ideas out there which have a real track record of success. 
To directly answer your questions:
1. Is it working for me?     
Yes, I make it work. But, again, there is nothing new here that I don't
already do or have done.
2. Is it a whole lot more work for you?     
No. Initially i had to restate my objectives as questions. Not hard to
do. Our curriculum has been rewritten to include vocab lists for each
state standard. Also, nothing new or difficult here. The lesson plan
format is cumbersome, awkward, and my mind simply doesn't  organize this
way in little boxes and blocks, but I guess any square can be fit into a
round hole if you force it hard enough.  :)
3. Does it give the amazing results that it promises?     
If you are a truly unskilled teacher who's only strategy is lecturing
from a pulpit and assigning worksheets and multiple choice tests using
scantron assessments, then yes, it will transform you and your students.
And, to be fair, there are many teachers and schools out there that have
unskilled teachers in front of the classroom who can actually be
transformed by these ideas. But, again, that is nothing new. We have
known for decades, based on research, that lecture and memorization is
the lowest form of true learning with the least retention rate. Hands-on
learning; actually having to produce something based upon knowledge, is
the highest form of learning with the highest retention rate. (such has
all art projects!). But I am guessing that no one on this list,
including you, teaches this way. So, the answer is a resounding NO. No
one (in their right mind, that is) can possibly believe that a vocab
list and a question and a different lesson plan format can transform
learnin!
 g.
4. Do you use it every day?     
We have to. No choice there. But my principal, who is a very smart and
caring guy, understands that the art program is more about actual hands
on learning than lecturing, so he understands that I will not be "doing
it" every day.
5. How often do you actively teach through a lesson that takes the kids
a long time to actually make their artwork?     
I teach high school so some of my classes are introductory and have
short lessons mixed with longer ones. The advanced classes have more
long term lessons. It's a mix of both. Again, Focused Learning is really
more about transforming the lecture classroom into something much more
effective. So the format fits comfortably into the lecture class which
can ask a question and answer it in a 50 minute time slot.  Don't worry
and I am sure you will do fine.Good luck on the start of your year.
 
PASubject: Learning FocusedFrom: Dana Paternoster Date: Fri, 21 Aug 2009
20:55:09 -0400X-Message-Number: 4  Hi, our school in Delaware is
adopting the Learning Focused model of makingand delivering lessons.  I
was wondering if anyone is doing this, and whatyour opinion is? I am the
only art teacher in our school, and I teach highschool Art I, II, III,
and IV. Is it working for you? Is it a whole lot more work for you?
Does it give the amazing results that it promises? Do you use it every
day? How often do you actively teach through a lesson that takes the
kids a longtime to actually make their artwork? So far all we have been
trained on is writing lesson and doing frequentshort assessments.  What
I am hoping for are different ways to deliver themessage to the
students.  In college I studied art and then took a feweducation classes
which really told us NOTHING about how to sucessfullydeliver or teach a
lesson.  Everything seemed based around speaking to kidsone-on-one,
whic!
 h I can not base a lesson for 32 students in a class on.Now, 9 years
later, I think I am just finally beginning to catch on.  It hasbeen a
very hard road that I have tried and tried to get off of, but justcan't
seem to find another path in life.  I must say that this list serv
hasbeen an endless source of ideas and encouragment. Thanks so much for
your comments. Dana
_________________________________________________________________
Get back to school stuff for them and cashback for you.
http://www.bing.com/cashback?form=MSHYCB&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=TEXT_MSHYCB_B
ackToSchool_Cashback_BTSCashback_1x1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Nam June Paik idea
From: LetsartAndy <letsart@hotmail.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 23:44:17 +0900
X-Message-Number: 9
Nam Jun Paik is a Korean and he passed away several years ago.
 
Lasrt year Me and my students had some fun and interesting art project
of his video art and performance.
And indeed we had a great exhibition in famous art gallery and we have
got great review.
 
We had three different project according to their age group.
 
For younger children, we have used founding objects and boxes to creat
their own TV Monitor.
And let them create and or draw the portrait of Nam-Jun Paik.  Some
children even made some monitor fuzzy effect.
If you want to I can send you some photos that you can look at.
 
Secondly, Older kidshave created TV-Video robot made out of boxes and
founding objects..such as old CD, various bottle caps for robot's 
eye.  This was a group project so they made much details.
 
Thirdly, these kids have reviewed some perfomance video done by Nam-Jun
Paik from YOuTUBE.
At first time these kids felt strange and akward by his performance
specially watching the scene of smashing Violin.
But we have talked about it and I have performed first and let them try
it.  Suprizingly kids have enjoyed it.
After different groups have performed differently I have made 5 min
video wirh techno music back ground.
And we placed the computer monitor on Robot and played.
It looked awsome.
 
Here is one of our video that I made from children's performance.  I
hope it can give you some idea.  If children are older enough let
children
to use MS moviemaker to create their own.   Simply place the computer
monitor on the belly ot head of the robot and computer on the leg.  Play
them in loop.
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUBgPj-BTHU&feature=fvsr
 
 
I have some pictures of the projects and if you need it please let me
know that I can send them to you through email.
 
Good Luck~!!!!
 
Andy Lee frm Korea
----------------------------------------
> From: bkramer@srvusd.net
> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Nam June Paik idea
> Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2009 09:41:41 -0700
>
> HI. I haven't used Nam June Paik as an artist motivator but then I'm
> not familiar with this artist and had to look the name up on google. I
> do have an idea for you. In fact, I was thinking of doing something
> like this for the coming year. I went to our district warehouse this
> summer to see if they had some old surplus file cabinets and book
> shelf (which I could spray paint for my room) . While there, they had
> stacks and stack of old surplus computers going to the dump. I
> confiscated a couple to take apart for the insides. Years ago when I
> went to an NAEA convention workshop, a college teacher had done the
> same thing and had his students make wearable jewelry with the wires,
> mother boards, etc. All you would basically need are the parts, wire
> cutters, and "nail glue" from the hardware store. Think of the
> exciting adventure and brain rush of finally taking apart one of those
> contraptions that seems to be taking over the entire whole. I need to
> check into the safety factors first though.
>
> Here is northern CA we had RAFT...Resource Area For Teachers...which
> many companies donate to and offers junk, unused items, machine parts
> for pennies on the dollar. I go there once a year to "shop" and get
> wire, sponge parts, office machinery parts, paper, ribbons, plastics,
> you-name-it. Most states have such places. You should check into
> recycling areas around you. Freecycle.org is a good start. I put in
> Boston, Mass. and a lot of good stuff came up. Google for places near
> you. There's places out there...especially around a big city like
> Boston. Toodles......Bunki
>
> ************************
> On Aug 21, 2009, at 5:48 PM, bmarder@somerville.mec.edu wrote:
>
>> Hi Bunki,
>>
>> I have been following you for some time-you have such great ideas.
>>
>> Have you used Nam June Paik as a motivating artist for art/video/
>> technology lesson
>> plans? I have middle schoolers in mind.
>>
>> I am giving this so much thought and looking for feedback.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Barbara from Boston
>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go
tohttp://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
_________________________________________________________________
8^=E@z 10;l ;}@O55 C`GOGX AV=C0m,@L:%F.55 B|?)GO<<?d~!
http://im.msn.co.kr/im/main/mainCoverDetail.asp?BbsCode=bbs01&Seq=2688
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Lesson plan help
From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 09:10:04 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 10
this is an Art 1 program for high school. It might be scaled down for
middle school depending on how good your classes are (talent wise) and
how they respond to instruction.
Ken Schwab
San Jose, CA
--- On Mon, 8/24/09, Pokojski, Kelly <Kelly-Pokojski@cdolinc.net> wrote:
> From: Pokojski, Kelly <Kelly-Pokojski@cdolinc.net>
> Subject: RE: [teacherartexchange] Lesson plan help
> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Date: Monday, August 24, 2009, 7:13 AM
> Will this be only high school or also
> middle or elementary?
> |Any idea of cost or subscription?
> Thanks for all the effort, any and all ideas are so
> welcome, especially
> for us that are relatively new.
> 
> 
> 
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Lesson plan help - High School
From: "Pokojski, Kelly" <Kelly-Pokojski@cdolinc.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 11:37:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11
Thanks I am still learning, I am not trained as an art teacher and had
not really done studio work since college, I am 47, so I am learning as
I go...is there a program that you would recommend or a direction....I
am trying to teach elements this year combined with a specific art
period and artist....the art program here is really each teachers own
individual desires, no one school is the same or teacher.
I learn a great deal from this site and have shared some of my lessons
that I think have turned out wonderfully.
I was an art history minor in college and love teaching art.
I also love your website the Incredible art Department, it is a great
source of ideas and information.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Mini Grants for supplies
From: Tina Vercelli <tvercelli@ardmore.k12.ok.us>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 14:21:18 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12
Another option similar to weareteachers.com is www.donorschoose.org.
Companies and individuals can choose programs to fund. Give it a try! I
know
of some teachers here that have been funded.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: sketchbook project opportunity
From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 21:20:38 GMT
X-Message-Number: 13
I just signed up for this project and thought others might want to -
either personally or for use with students.
http://www.arthousecoop.com/projects/sketchbookproject
"Help us build a library of sketchbooks by creating your own and
donating it to a collection that will tour galleries across the
country."
creatively,
Linda Kieling
(middle school in Oregon)
____________________________________________________________
Best Weight Loss Program - Click Here!
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL2141/fc/BLSrjpTFoYbHRlTMEwktAhXZrqm3
DJwx8akggVOj8iNBON1S0KfIEw0TJuQ/
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: BE CAREFUL USING JUNKED COMPUTERS!!
From: Emmy Wood <naturehappens@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 16:53:20 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 14
I too have a stash af computerboards that I would love to make into
jewelry.... But I've heard what Maggie is talking about too- I have been
thinking about ways to seal in the toxins- maybe dimensional glaze? Wax?
Bunki- you should check out the work of Edward Burtynsky- he has a DVD
called Manufactured Landscapes- it is beautiful and horrifying! He
photographs man-made landscapes, and talks about the environmental
hazards... In your free time of course ;)
By the way, Do you have anymore info on how to get started with
zentangles? I found the website, but can't afford to buy the kit right
now- I think I understand the basic idea- filling spaces with lines and
patterns, Are there general guidelines for the "string" and What about
pattern sample ideas? I would love to do these with my students who are
afraid of drawing... and maybe teach it to my fellow faculty too
Thanks and have a great year everyone!
Emmy
Subject: Re: BE CAREFUL USING JUNKED COMPUTERS!!
From: Bunki Kramer <bkramer@srvusd.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Aug 2009 16:21:15 -0700
X-Message-Number: 17
Hi Mags. I had heard that monitors were toxic materials (which we  
weren't going to use) but the motherboard pieces and wires were okay.  
I saw and heard this on a TV show about old computers. Where did you  
get your information? Toodles......Bunki
***********************
On Aug 23, 2009, at 2:42 PM, mwhiteec@cablemodem.com.ec wrote:
> Old computers--the motherboards and monitors--contain toxic heavy  
> metals such
> as cadmium, lead, and mercury.  Because the U.S. does not want to deal
> responsibly with their disposal, millions of them are shipped  
> overseas to
> countries with really lax safety standards for the workers who  
> dismantle and
> recycle the parts.
>
> Maggie
---
END OF DIGEST
---
naturehappens@yahoo.com
leave-641330-344111.b480dd23ea67a524abf1ca51ce6b0c3c@lists.pub.getty.edu
      
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Computer parts that are safe for jewelry making
From: Bunki Kramer <bkramer@srvusd.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Aug 2009 19:10:18 -0700
X-Message-Number: 15
Hi Judy. Thanks for the heads-up on the sites. I'm going to check with  
BayArea Waste and see what they say. Maybe they have computers already  
broken down for recycling. I'm sure this would be safer. Wish I had  
those earrings of yours. "One woman's trash is another woman's  
treasure". I'm all about garage sales! Toodles.....Bunki
****************************
On Aug 24, 2009, at 7:26 AM, Judy Decker wrote:
> Greetings Getty Folks,
>
> I know some computer parts are safe for jewelry making. I had a pin
> and earrings made from Friendly Plastic and computer parts (maybe
> memory sticks? - just small squares of the green board). I never got
> around to experimenting myself (or researching what was safe) so never
> did the project with my students. Wish I had known a couple months ago
> - I could have sent them to Bunki! I never wore them. I sold them at
> our church garage sale for $5.00 for the set (a super bargain!).
>
> I just Googled - computer parts that are safe to use in jewelry making
> - and got a lot of hits.
>
> I also Googled - computer memory used for jewelry -
> and got some hits.
>
> Happy surfing!
>
> Judy
>
> Note: If you post a reply to this - please delete my email address. So
> are, your efforts are working to reduce Spam on this account. I
> appreciate all you are doing. I think I have only seen a couple of
> people posted this address so far.
>
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ssyrie@cheneysd.org
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