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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: August 18, 2008

---------

From: Watkins, Patricia (PWATKIN1_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Aug 28 2008 - 08:11:32 PDT


I use photos, drawing from life, as well as the old master works. I
still feel that there is something to be learned from copying an
excellent image whether from a photo or a master work of art. As an
individual who started my education in Commercial Art, we were taught
that if you change an image by 20%, it becomes yours. As well that you
can copy old master works as students as long as you credit the Master
Artist. Of course, if the competition forbids that, you must comply to
have your work considered. I like to give my students all the options I
can to improve their own work. I find that after copying a really fine
piece of work that I and my students come back to our own work with a
fresh eye and a bit of enhanced style.

Patricia Watkins, AS, BA, MA, All-level Visual Art certification
Art Specialist
HISD Strategic Partners Fine Arts Grant Liaison
MFAH Glassell Visual Arts Teacher Leader, Cohort I
M. C. Williams Middle School
6100 Knox St., Houston, Tx. 77091 (Rte.6)
713-696-2600 Fax 713-696-2604
pwatkin1@houstonisd.org
"Fine Arts Education Matters"
Art: the Essential Part of Everything!

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, August 19, 2008 3:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: August 18, 2008

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, August 18, 2008.

1. Re: Learning by copying?
2. Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 17, 2008
3. Re: Wine Cork Use
4. RE: teacherartexchange digest: August 17, 2008
5. Re: Learning by copying?
6. Re: Seven Period Day Advise Needed
7. Re: Learning by copying?
8. Re: Olympic Parade of Nations Art
9. Re: donated item list- cork?
10. Re: Learning by copying?
11. Re: Seven Period Day Advise Needed
12. fractals lesson plan and tools in a bag drawing activity
13. Re: Olympic Parade of Nations Art
14. Corks and copying
15. Optical illusion coloring pages?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 05:10:52 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

Woody,

Thank you so much for your input on this. An artist perspective is such
a great and valued opinion.

I suggest to students both Elementary and High School being in the
digital camera age to take photos to use for projects. I polled my
students on who had a personal digital camera and was surprised to see
who many had them. I offered them to bring in their memory cards,
cameras to download the images to our classroom computers for them to
manipulate the photos to create compositions they could use for works.
This has worked very successfully.

I do suggest to students to work from "real" objects, develop
compositions from observation. We discuss the transition of doing
onsite sketches, taking photos of the observation, then moving back into
the classroom (studio) to continue the composition.

The copy/imitation issue is a teachable moment. Like many things
guiding students when to know to use copying/imitation is what we do as
teachers.

For many competitions that my High School and Elementary students submit
works for the word "original" comes up all the time. As a class we
discuss that copying magazine photos or other works of art is not
acceptable for submission and why it isn't. For our school art shows
students must submit at least one "original" work and if a work is not
"original" students must provide that information on their works id tag
and within their artist statement. What is interesting is that over
time the non-original works have decreased while the original works have
increased.

Jeff (Minnesota)

> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Learning by copying?
> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Date: Sunday, August 17, 2008, 11:16 PM
> I work from photos myself but they are my own photos. I do
> not work
> from magazines or even other
> peoples photos. It's not just the ownership of the
> image that bothers
> me. My art is personal and my
> camera serves as my sketch book. I compose in the camera.
> Artists
> have found some value in copying
> from old masters but students need to learn to see by
> drawing from
> observation before they utilize
> photos. The camera flattens space for them - they need to
> learn to
> translate the 3-D world onto a
> flat plane themselves. I'll be reading with interest
> what other
> teachers have to say on this topic. If
> you do have students copy - please make them understand
> what the
> arguments are against it.
>
Woody
>
> On Aug 16, 2008, at 10:31 PM, Andrea Cope wrote:
>
> > I'm about to begin my first year teaching high
> school art, though
> > I'm a seasoned teacher in other fine arts courses.
> My colleagues
> > insist that no copying ever be allowed, for any
> reason. While I
> > understand the importance of the students learning to
> develop
> > confidence in their own creativity, I also see the
> value of
> > learning via imitation. I've certainly improved
> my own skills by
> > examining drawings and photographs and trying to
> reproduce what I
> > see. I saved all of the responses to the recent
> question about
> > artistic process. Several of you mentioned working
> from
> > photographs. How is that different? Or is it?
> I'd like to be
> > able to offer a different point of view to my
> teammates but I need
> > a better foundation. And I'm open to the
> possibility that my
> > instinct is wrong. Do you allow your students to copy
> as part of
> > the learning process? If not, why?
> > Andrea
> >
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> Read My Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/August.html
>
> Watercolors on Note Cards
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

      

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 17, 2008
From: "Robert Oppecker" <roppecker@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 08:22:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

On Mon, Aug 18, 2008 at 4:00 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Sunday, August 17, 2008.
arning by copying?

> Subject: Re: donated item list- cork?
> From: "Diane Beilby" <dibeilby@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 07:48:21 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several years
> can anyone share how they have used these
>
> Diane
>

Hi Diane-

I use cork wine stoppers as a shield for sharp objects in the studio
such as x-acto knives and scribes.
You will not need a whole truckload for this purpose but they work
very well and it helps to avoid stray cuts and blade breakage.

-Robert
Williamsburg, VA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Wine Cork Use
From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 06:05:03 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

> > A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several
> years
> > can anyone share how they have used these
> >
> > Diane

Diane,

Use them for printmaking purposes (Stamping with them), collage (cut
them and mount them), corks for ceramic jugs, sculptures connections
(hot glue them into shapes, connect other materials into them (wire,
metal rods etc.).

Jeff (Minnesota

> > A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several
> years
> > can anyone share how they have used these
> >
> > Diane

      

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: teacherartexchange digest: August 17, 2008
From: "Watkins, Patricia" <PWATKIN1@houstonisd.org>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 08:17:47 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I do allow my students to copy occasionally. As was said, it must be
freehand with the original Master artist acknowledged. There is
something to be gained from copying a very good piece of art work. It
gives the students a guide. Afterwards they go back to their own
original art work with a new confidence. I teach middle school.

Patricia Watkins
Houston, Texas

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Monday, August 18, 2008 3:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: August 17, 2008

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Sunday, August 17, 2008.

1. Re: donated item list- cork?
2. Re: donated item list- cork?
3. Re: Learning by copying?
4. Re: donated item list- cork?
5. Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 16, 2008
6. Re: Learning by copying?
7. Re: getting a job
8. Re: Learning by copying?
9. Re: if I was a mean coordinator... rubric
10. RE: donated item list- cork?
11. Re: Learning by copying?
12. Re: Learning by copying?
13. Seven Period Day Advise Needed
14. from long to shorter art classes
15. Re: A new pun list for everyone
16. Fish Pun list, Bird Pun list, Visual Pun list
17. Re: A new pun list for everyone
18. Re: Learning by copying?
19. Re: donated item list- cork?
20. Re: Learning by copying?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: donated item list- cork?
From: "Diane Beilby" <dibeilby@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 07:48:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several years
can anyone share how they have used these

Diane

----- Original Message -----
From: "Holmgren" <holmgren@lakedalelink.net>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Friday, August 15, 2008 1:55 PM
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] donated item list?

> Some additional items on my list are:
>
> paper grocery bags
> telephone wire
> plastic rectangular baby food containers and lids
> corks and film cannisters
> matboard scraps
> small wood chunks
> microwave dinner containers
> newspaper
> magazines
> egg cartons
>
> Mary H.
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG. Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.6.3/1611 -
Release
> Date: 8/14/2008 6:20 AM
>
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: donated item list- cork?
From: twoducks@aol.com
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 09:23:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

From: Diane Beilby
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] donated item list- cork?

A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several yearsB

can anyone share how they have used theseB

Diane,

I do not know what age group you teach. In my elementary art room my
construction-obsessed sculptors would most likely have traded a week's
worth of lunches for a handful of corks. They used them endlessly in
their work in endless ways; what your students say if you asked them?

kathy douglas, K-3 massachusetts, retired
TAB
teachingforartisticbehavior.org

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 06:49:15 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

> Do you allow
> your students to copy as part of the learning process? If
> not, why?

Andrea,

Thank you for posing this question again at the beginning of the school
year as it makes all pause and "think" our position on this issue. So
many are impassioned by the "originality", "copying" issue. There are
the purest and those who are not.

I think the bottom line on this issue is what do you want to have
students accomplish if they do copy/imitate? What will they gain?
If they do not copy/imitate? What will they gain?

Another point here is for students to be honest with viewers if they
have copied or imitated a work of art. They have re-created the image
using their own skill level and techniques but the original image was
not their own. The same thing can be said if they trace or opaque a
piece of work. Drawing the line between free hand drawing and using
devices. Honesty of how the image came about, was produced is something
I think is the core of the debate. Some students the copy/imitate is
about the only level they will get at while other students will migrate
to the original concept. We as teachers have to facilitate the movement
to original but also be mindful some students by their own learning
style or commitment may never reach that level (not penalize them
because they cannot).

I wonder how many "Artist" could come to terms with some of these same
questions about copying/imitation? How honestly they could examine their
own processes?

Jeff (Minnesota)

      

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: donated item list- cork?
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 09:07:55 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I've had my upper level classes make worry jars. The challenge was to
create
a container out of clay that had an opening the size of the cork. I
called
them worry jars because I wanted to disuade my students from getting TOO

creative in what they would put in them! They could also be banks.
~Michal
3-12 Kansas Art Teacher
HS Digital Communications
Technology Integration Specialist
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
http://spotlight.digication.com/maustin

>A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several years can anyone
share
>how they have used these

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 16, 2008
From: "Keith Johnson" <kjphotog@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 08:11:46 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

One of my most successful projects is where I have students research
the works of other master photographers and then come up with their
own interpretation to photograph. For me the reference gives simply
gives students a starting point that's all.

> I'm about to begin my first year teaching high school art, though
I'm a seasoned teacher in >other fine arts courses. My colleagues
insist that no copying ever be allowed, for any >reason. While I
understand the importance of the students learning to develop
confidence in >their own creativity.

(for some strange reason, I keep getting my replies blocked maybe this
will work)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 08:15:10 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

Very well put Jeff.

I deal with it simply - copying is just fine for
practice, especially when learning difficult things
like animal anatomy.

Tracing is just fine too, as long as you are tracing
your own original drawing, like for the purpose of
transferring it to a nicer surface. No tracing of
another artist's work, period.

Nothing will be put on display that is copied from
another artist's work.

 

Betty C Bowen
printmaker, painter
art educator
Cushing Oklahoma
bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net
http://www.bettybowenart.com
http://bettycbowen.blogspot.com/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: getting a job
From: Patricia Knott <pknott_6@comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 11:27:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

On Aug 16, 2008, at 6:38 PM, Anne Verrier Scatolini wrote:

> check out MOCA CAS...Museum of Contemporary Art - Contemporary Art
> Start in Los Angeles. A wonderful pedagogy imbued in creative
> inquiry that " delays premature closure" the fear that keeps kids
> paralyzed.
> On Aug 16, 2008, at 2:58 PM, Patricia Knott wrote:
>
>>

Thanks Anne

This a nice site and perfect for my Why Man Creates Class

http://www.moca.org/cas/?id=27

Patty

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Gayle Parent <gayleparent@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 08:41:03 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

I allow my students to copy at times. I think it's a time honored
way to learn. However, I insist that they always say that they
copied. When they copy, they are never to say that it was their own
idea.
G

On Aug 16, 2008, at 9:31 PM, Andrea Cope wrote:

> I'm about to begin my first year teaching high school art, though
> I'm a seasoned teacher in other fine arts courses. My colleagues
> insist that no copying ever be allowed, for any reason. While I
> understand the importance of the students learning to develop
> confidence in their own creativity, I also see the value of
> learning via imitation. I've certainly improved my own skills by
> examining drawings and photographs and trying to reproduce what I
> see. I saved all of the responses to the recent question about
> artistic process. Several of you mentioned working from
> photographs. How is that different? Or is it? I'd like to be
> able to offer a different point of view to my teammates but I need
> a better foundation. And I'm open to the possibility that my
> instinct is wrong. Do you allow your students to copy as part of
> the learning process? If not, why?
> Andrea
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: if I was a mean coordinator... rubric
From: Patricia Knott <pknott_6@comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 11:57:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

Thanks from me too Ellen

I just ordered the book and hope I can make my agenda for my
department from it for the entire year. I'm a big fan of Wiggins and
McTighe

>>> Wormeli's fourth belief is that academic grades should
>>> be a direct reflection of mastery. This means that factors such as
>>> effort, behavior, and attendance should not be included in
>>> calculating grades
>>> (chapter eight). It also means that students should be allowed to
>>> redo work without penalty (chapter ten) and should not be graded on
>>> homework

This seems to be a tough concept for many teachers. I went through a
new middle school grading creation this past year and I found it very
hard for the teachers to separate behaviors ( and mostly it was bad
behaviors) from judging the skills and understanding. Someday
soon I hope somebody comes up with this kind of guide just for art.
Often the general learning patterns in art have nothing to do with
what happens in other classes and I think that is what makes it so
difficult for us in art to follow what every one else is told should
be.

I'm a big believer in giving problems to solve and asking lots of
questions and then only worrying about the product after the student
tackles all the questions. That can take a long time, and progress
can be in inches. With my talented students it's often easy to get
them to redo and revise. With the rest, my biggest weakness is the
student who does something just to get by and could care less about
making it better. I have plenty of high school kids who are
satisfied with a "D" just to get by, and then attitude and behavior
does play a role.

Patty

On Aug 16, 2008, at 11:17 PM, Jeff Pridie wrote:

> Ellen,
>
> Thank you for this jewel of information. The levels of creativity
> you mentioned and the book I am looking forward to further research
> on and reading. Great points in the information you provided.
>
> Jeff (Minnesota)
>
>
>
>> From: Sears, Ellen <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] if I was a mean coordinator... rubric
>> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
>> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>> Date: Saturday, August 16, 2008, 7:33 PM
>> "if I was a mean coordinator, I would make a rubric
>> that evaluated my
>> teacher's lessons and expectations."
>>
>> I don't think that would make you a mean coordinator.
>> A rubric is for
>> all parties - they help me put into words what I am
>> assessing, and they
>> help the kids understand my expectations. I am reading a
>> book that has
>> helped me verbalize what I do in my room. I have never
>> highlighted or
>> put post-it notes in a book - this one is filled with
>> both....
>>
>> As for assessing creativity - I like to use the levels of
>> creativity...
>>
>> Levels of creativity
>> The first three levels of creativity can be attained by
>> anyone who is
>> motivated and who has persistence enough to see projects
>> and ideas
>> through. The last two levels may be unattainable to all but
>> those who
>> are highly gifted creatively, or those who are naturally
>> creative
>> geniuses.
>> 1. Primitive and intuitive expression:
>> 2. Academic and technical level:
>> 3. Inventive level:
>> 4. Innovative level:
>> 5. Genius level:
>>
>> As for the book:
>>
>> "Fair isn't Always Equal"
>> Rick Wormeli
>>
>> "Wormeli has four beliefs that drive his book. His
>> first belief is that
>> differentiation is an effective mechanism for student
>> learning.
>> Wormeli's definition of differentiation is compatible
>> with Tomlinson's
>> (2001) definition of work that is tiered up or down based
>> on student
>> abilities. Wormeli is an advocate for focusing instruction
>> and
>> assessment on standards. He does not advocate particular
>> standards, but
>> he suggests that whatever standards are used should be
>> prioritized in
>> terms of important concepts and skills. This means that
>> "fluff"
>> assignments should never be given (pp. 34-35).
>>
>> The author's second belief is that the goal of
>> education is mastery of
>> the skills and important concepts that have been
>> established for
>> students to learn. Because the question of what should be
>> mastered is
>> beyond the scope of the book, Wormeli focuses on the
>> criteria for the
>> evidence of mastery. This section is influenced by Wiggins
>> & McTighe
>> (2005). (Readers desiring more background on what
>> constitutes evidence
>> of mastery should consult chapter seven of their
>> Understanding by
>> Design.)
>>
>> The third belief driving the book is that assessment should
>> be used as a
>> tool to inform instructional decisions. Readers will come
>> away with a
>> clear understanding of the role of pre-assessments,
>> formative
>> assessments, and summative assessments in a differentiated
>> classroom.
>> Readers wanting broader coverage of the relationship of
>> assessment to
>> instruction should consult Popham (2003).
>>
>> Wormeli's fourth belief is that academic grades should
>> be a direct
>> reflection of mastery. This means that factors such as
>> effort, behavior,
>> and attendance should not be included in calculating grades
>> (chapter
>> eight). It also means that students should be allowed to
>> redo work
>> without penalty (chapter ten) and should not be graded on
>> homework (pp.
>> 116-120). For broader coverage on the topic of grading
>> readers should
>> consult Marzano (2000) or Guskey & Bailey (2001).
>>
>> Education Book Review
>>
>> Getting ready for our second week of school,
>> Ellen
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: donated item list- cork?
From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 12:24:24 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Your kids can probably figure out numerous ways to use them. Draw
directly on the corks; add people & animal appendages/body parts by
slitting the cork and inserting stiffened paper pictures; make
connectors with small pieces of telephone wire or paper clips for
moveable appendages. The artist Marisol could be a cool connection.

Jan in Tampa ( eyeing Fay)
Gr 1-5

-----Original Message-----
From: Diane Beilby [mailto:dibeilby@sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Sunday, August 17, 2008 8:48 AM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] donated item list- cork?

A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several years
can anyone share how they have used these

Diane

----- Original Message -----
From: "Holmgren" <holmgren@lakedalelink.net>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Friday, August 15, 2008 1:55 PM
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] donated item list?

> Some additional items on my list are:
>
> paper grocery bags
> telephone wire
> plastic rectangular baby food containers and lids
> corks and film cannisters
> matboard scraps
> small wood chunks
> microwave dinner containers
> newspaper
> magazines
> egg cartons
>
> Mary H.
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG. Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.6.3/1611 -
Release
> Date: 8/14/2008 6:20 AM
>
>

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 09:30:41 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 11
The "Learning by Copying" debate has gone on for generations in art
education, and is unlikely to be resolved any day soon.  My take on the
situation is this:  In the secondary schools, where studio classes
prevail, there are the practical considerations of time, materials and
access to ideas to confront.  If you have experienced a reduction of
contact time with your students, their opportunities to draw and paint
from direct observation is likely compromised.  Using reference photos
or copying master works is an acceptable, albeit not perfect, substitute
for direct observation art activities. In addition, keep in mind these
are students, not professional artists.  Studio classes should teach, in
addition to the creative process, art skills-- something that
universities sometimes forget in their fine art classes.  One of those
skills is increasing the student's ability to observe all of the visual
clues a given subject presents, and the use of photos can
 provide that type of information.  
Keen observation skills are essential to the technical side of
art--perspective, color mixing, brush techniques, use of shadow, etc.
Very often, the fine artists among us would rather not deal with that
aspect of the creative process, but ignoring it can be at your own and
your student's peril.  How your students deal with those skills is part
of what makes them unique and creative, which you nurture as much as
possible. However, if your kids don't know how to hold a brush, it is
pretty difficult to paint effectively, and if you can't effectively
perceive the world around you, it's equally as hard to interpret that
world through art.
Jerry
      
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Patricia Knott <pknott_6@comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 13:41:50 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12
I always hate this issue.  I think most "talented " kids start out by  
copying and then somebody recognizes and tells them they are talented  
and they get stuck in a comfort place.   Getting to the next step  
becomes a problem.
Most kids can't even copy- so I think it shouldn't even be something  
that comes into the basic levels of art instruction.   Of course,  
there is a rich history of serious art students  copying the masters,  
but that  includes an analysis of the master's process, thinking, and  
applications of historical perspectives.
What is the point of copying?   .... to get a product with some kind  
of sense of accomplishment?
Instead, can't we pose problems with multiple solutions and make the  
pride in the idea?
I worked in all kinds of art and design jobs for 20 something years  
before I started teaching.    What I learned was that skill was not  
as important as ideas. I did plenty of jobs where my skills paid my  
rent,  but the jobs that required my ideas is were I made my  
progress.  There is always some one who can make something look  
good.. there aren't that many "someones" who know how to get an idea.
> what do you want to have students accomplish if they do copy/ 
> imitate? What will they gain?
I deal with curriculum all the time. I have to put the standards into  
the curriculum . When I look at lesson plans  across the board it's  
always mostly about the product.  There are 6 Standards....
1. Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes
2. Using knowledge of structures and functions
3. Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas
4. Understanding the visual arts in relation to history and cultures
5. Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of  
their work and the work of others
6. Making connections between visual arts and other discipline
  but I think the "weight" in giving kids the opportunity to succeed  
is not distributed in 6 ways. Why can't a kid who is very good at #4  
get the same regard as as the kid who can make it well?    I have had  
lots of students who love the history and the criticism and  
connections and they get their own opportunities at the art show as  
guides, reviewers, display makers.  Accommodating all the interests  
and styles is what IS differentiation in the art classroom.
Copying has nothing to do with Standard 3
> Students select and use subject matter, symbols, and ideas to  
> communicate meaning
I'm going to be bold and say that copying doesn't accomplish anything  
but refrigerator art. Teaching kids how they they can take/steal,  
abrogate, transform, translate, mutilate, and connect is how we can  
measure learning. I really think , if we think we are making life- 
long learners and future consumers, we have to be absolutely  
sensitive to how each child responds in the art room and give every  
opportunity for each child to be successful in one of the standards.
Awhile back Marvin asked about to incorporate team/group work in the  
art room.  I f we put all the kids on design teams and let them copy  
and sound off  from each other, then we may best be able to  
incorporate true brainstorming and idea generation.
I'm just thinking out loud here, I think that's what is best about  
these lists.
Patty
On Aug 17, 2008, at 9:49 AM, Jeff Pridie wrote:
>> Do you allow
>> your students to copy as part of the learning process?  If
>> not, why?
>
> Andrea,
>
> Thank you for posing this question again at the beginning of the  
> school year as it makes all pause and "think" our position on this  
> issue.  So many are impassioned by the "originality", "copying"  
> issue.  There are the purest and those who are not.
>
> I think the bottom line on this issue is what do you want to have  
> students accomplish if they do copy/imitate? What will they gain?
> If they do not copy/imitate? What will they gain?
>
> Another point here is for students to be honest with viewers if  
> they have copied or imitated a work of art. They have re-created  
> the image using their own skill level and techniques but the  
> original image was not their own.  The same thing can be said if  
> they trace or opaque a piece of work. Drawing the line between free  
> hand drawing and using devices.  Honesty of how the image came  
> about, was produced is something I think is the core of the  
> debate.  Some students the copy/imitate is about the only level  
> they will get at while other students will migrate to the original  
> concept. We as teachers have to facilitate the movement to original  
> but also be mindful some students by their own learning style or  
> commitment may never reach that level (not penalize them because  
> they cannot).
>
> I wonder how many "Artist" could come to terms with some of these  
> same questions about copying/imitation? How honestly they could  
> examine their own processes?
>
> Jeff (Minnesota)
>
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Seven Period Day Advise Needed
From: "Randy Menninghaus" <india99@infionline.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 14:18:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13
Dear Joe and others,
My high school never went to 80 periods.  We got close about 8 years
ago,
than the Science dept. had a mutiny.( the had double periods already
and
did not want to lose them  )
So I have taught ceramics and general art classes in 45 minute units all
my
life.
You have been given lots of good advice.   Starting and stopping/cleanup
routines become critical.
I tend to give an overview/introduce the unit(10 minutes), than have two
to
three days where I meet them at the door and say go straight to making
art.
than we stop briefly and look at what is going on and set a due date.
Clean up is hard . There are always the ones that clean up ten minutes
early cause they don't like to be "Rushed at the sink".  Good luck on
figuring them out.  We have about a 7 minute warning for clean up. I
also
have to say more than once, in the early part of the year " I dismiss
you,
not the bell"... so if the whole class gets behind and the bell goes, it
is
still their responsibility to stay, and clean.  If you can stand by it,
the
clean up is more efficient.  It helps to be standing in the door way the
first time you do have to hold a class back for clean up.  If they have
disregarded their cues for clean up I  won't write a late pass either. (
My
school's mascot is the witch , can you tell?:>)
Ceramics with 45 minutes. I always do them only when I have a student
teachers. I seek out student teachers who have good ceramic skills.
That
has worked pretty darn well for me. 
Randy in Maine,( who is trying not to panic over the new AP course I am
teaching this fall... in one 45 minute period.)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: from long to shorter art classes
From: MERRILEE GLADKOSKY <gladrag@snet.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 13:55:06 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 14
Last year we went through a change from one hour to 45
minute art classes on the elementary level.  We went
to a four day rotation.  No one wants to hear that we
actually do lose time with the transition,
introduction and cleanup taking up so much of EACH
time the children come in but it's very true.  I had a
hard time with unfinished work this year and although
I have been teaching art since the dinorsaurs ruled
the earth (well, shortly thereafter) I have been
thrown off track by the change.  
     The biggest thing I have done to help myself is
to limit the media I used during a single day/week. 
The less media clean up I have the better off I am. 
Then, one class sets up the tables for the next one
coming in.  I can teach good, spiraling lessons but I
cannot keep up with going from one class to another
with total set up changes.  Just offering this as food
for thought. 
Merrilee in CT
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: A new pun list for everyone
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 16:00:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 15
Sue - great list! I was going to add this to the list of birds, fish, &
I 
thought there was another list??? But somehow I can't find where I saved
it, 
and the search function on getty isn't working. Do you, or someone else,
have those lists they can share?
~Michal
> I know we've done the list of puns before for Fish and for Birds, but
I 
> thought I would try something new this year (my seniors are tired of
the 
> punny fish exercise on the first day!).....here's a list of Common 
> Botanical Names that could be used for a 'pun' exercise...... 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Fish Pun list, Bird Pun list, Visual Pun list
From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 17:40:07 -0400
X-Message-Number: 16
Here are the lists I created way back when...
FISHES
Paradise fish 
Firemouth Cichlid 
Convict Cichlid 
Zebra Cichlid 
Rosy Barb 
Tiger Barb 
White Cloud Mountain Fish 
Swordtail fish
Bleeding Heart fish 
Blind cave fish
Pencil Fish 
Penguin Fish 
Scissors Tail Fish 
Armoured Catfish
 Jewel Fish 
Leaf Fish 
Clown Loach 
Archer Fish 
Egyptian Mouth-breeder 
Mosquito Fish 
Flag fish 
Black Widow fish 
Pirate Perch 
Toadfish 
Striped Squirrel fish
Dragonfish 
Goosefish
King Fish
Hog Snapper
Winter Founder
Rabbitfish
School Bass
BIRD NAMES
Bee-eaters
Bellbirds
Birds of Paradise
Ovenbirds
Canvasback
Catbirds
Corn Crakes
Cowbirds
Elf Owl
Scrubfowl
Seabird
Secretary Bird
Flycatchers
Frogmouths
Fork-tailed swift
Turtle Dove
Kingbirds
Kingfishers
Man of War Bird
Night Hawk
Grasshopper Sparrow
Egyptian Plover
Rock Hopper Penguin
Yellow Hammer
Umbrella Bird
Grey Winged Trumpeter
Fruit Dove
Elephant Bird
Dollarbird
Tiger Parrot
Sandwich Tern
Firecrest
King Penguin
Rose Headed Parakeet
Festive Parrot
Scissor -Tailed Nightjar
Spotted Antbird
VISUAL PUNS
Flower Bulb 
Jack Frost 
Fire Drill 
Dragon Fly 
Dr. Pepper 
tap dancing
tooth fairy
Watch Dog 
Second Hand Store
Strong Box 
Bookworm 
Wisdom Tooth 
Mail Man
Boxing Match 
Horse Fly
Hot dog
Car pool
Gator-aid
Eye-ball
Fruit Bowl
Grandfather clock
TV Dinner
World wide web 
Pen-Pals
Spelling Bee
Home run
Brainstorm
Coat of Arms
Bedspring
Bookworm
Loud Tie
Light-house
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: A new pun list for everyone
From: Ann Heineman <aiheineman@prodigy.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 17:51:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 17
This isn't what you requested, Michal, but I came across it when I was  
looking for your request. Judy Grochowski posted it several years ago:
"Once upon a time the animals decided to do something heroic to meet  
the problems of the 'new world.'  So they organized a school.
They adopted an activity curriculum consisting of running, climbing,  
swimming, and flying.  To make it easier to administer the curriculum,  
ALL the animals took ALL the subjects.
The duck was excellent in swimming, in fact, better than her  
instructor; but she only made passing grades in flying and was very  
poor in running.  Since she was slow in running, she had to stay after  
school and also drop swimming in order to practice running.  This was  
kept up until her webbed feet were badly worn and she was only average  
in swimming.  But average was acceptable in school, so nobody worried  
about that except the duck.
The rabbit started at the top of the class in running, but had a  
nervous breakdown because of so much make-up work in swimming.  The  
squirrel was excellent in climbing until she developed frustration in  
the flying class when her teacher made her start from the ground up  
instead of from the treetop down.  She also developed a charely horse  
from overexertion and got a C in climbing and a D in running.
The eagle was a problem child and was disciplined severely.  In the  
climbing class she beat all the others to the top of the tree, but  
insisted on using her own way to get there.
At the end of the year, an abnormal eel that could swim exceedingly  
well, and also run, climb, and fly a little, had the highest average  
and was valedictorian.
The prairie dogs stayed out of school and fought the tax levy because  
the administration would not add digging and burrowing to the  
curriculum.  They apprenticed their child to a badger and later joined  
the groundhogs and gophers to start a successful private school."
		Best wishes to all of you for a successful school year!!
				
				Ann-on-y-mouse in Columbus
				Art teacher, K-5, retired
On Aug 17, 2008, at 5:00 PM, M. Austin wrote:
> Sue - great list! I was going to add this to the list of birds,  
> fish, & I thought there was another list??? But somehow I can't find  
> where I saved it, and the search function on getty isn't working. Do  
> you, or someone else, have those lists they can share?
> ~Michal
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Gayle Parent <gayleparent@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 17:48:31 -0700
X-Message-Number: 18
When I began painting I was terrified of all that I had to do/learn  
all at once.  My beginning painting professor had us make collages in  
our sketchbooks, then choose one from which to paint.  That's not  
copying, but I think copying offers the same sort of help.  One can  
begin to learn some skills with the materials while using someone  
else's ideas for the composition, subject matter, etc.  I felt less  
overwhelmed working in that way.  I was also given assignments in  
drawing and painting classes to copy a master artist's work.  That  
was at two different universities. So....I see some decent reasons  
for allowing students to copy.  I've never known a serious artist who  
wanted to copy for long.  Copying is only a crutch or a learning tool  
until one's own ideas begin to flourish.
That said, my elementary students often want to draw popular Disney  
or other cartoon characters.  I allow them to do that once in a  
semester, if they want to, which seems to be an acceptable  
compromise.  They understand that copy means look at and draw, not  
trace, and that they must always say that they have copied the image  
from someone else.
G
On Aug 16, 2008, at 9:31 PM, Andrea Cope wrote:
> I'm about to begin my first year teaching high school art, though  
> I'm a seasoned teacher in other fine arts courses.  My colleagues  
> insist that no copying ever be allowed, for any reason.  While I  
> understand the importance of the students learning to develop  
> confidence in their own creativity, I also see the value of  
> learning via imitation.  I've certainly improved my own skills by  
> examining drawings and photographs and trying to reproduce what I  
> see.  I saved all of the responses to the recent question about  
> artistic process.  Several of you mentioned working from  
> photographs.  How is that different?  Or is it?  I'd like to be  
> able to offer a different point of view to my teammates but I need  
> a better foundation.  And I'm open to the possibility that my  
> instinct is wrong. Do you allow your students to copy as part of  
> the learning process?  If not, why?
> Andrea
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: donated item list-  cork?
From: "Holmgren" <holmgren@lakedalelink.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 21:51:34 -0500
X-Message-Number: 19
I use corks for stamp printing--just as they are, also at times I have
glued 
foam pieces in various shapes to them.  I also use them for assemblage 
sculptures with other found objects. When making plastercraft masks,
they 
work well as armatures for shaping the masks--such as for eyes, etc.
Mary H.
>A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several years
> can anyone share how they have used these
>
> Diane
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 17 Aug 2008 22:16:32 -0600
X-Message-Number: 20
I work from photos myself but they are my own photos. I do not work  
from magazines or even other
peoples photos. It's not just the ownership of the image that bothers  
me. My art is personal and my
camera serves as my sketch book. I compose in the camera. Artists  
have found some value in copying
from old masters but students need to learn to see by drawing from  
observation before they utilize
photos. The camera flattens space for them - they need to learn to  
translate the 3-D world onto a
flat plane themselves. I'll be reading with interest what other  
teachers have to say on this topic. If
you do have students copy - please make them understand what the  
arguments are against it.
	
Woody
On Aug 16, 2008, at 10:31 PM, Andrea Cope wrote:
> I'm about to begin my first year teaching high school art, though  
> I'm a seasoned teacher in other fine arts courses.  My colleagues  
> insist that no copying ever be allowed, for any reason.  While I  
> understand the importance of the students learning to develop  
> confidence in their own creativity, I also see the value of  
> learning via imitation.  I've certainly improved my own skills by  
> examining drawings and photographs and trying to reproduce what I  
> see.  I saved all of the responses to the recent question about  
> artistic process.  Several of you mentioned working from  
> photographs.  How is that different?  Or is it?  I'd like to be  
> able to offer a different point of view to my teammates but I need  
> a better foundation.  And I'm open to the possibility that my  
> instinct is wrong. Do you allow your students to copy as part of  
> the learning process?  If not, why?
> Andrea
>
Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
Read My Blog:
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/August.html
Watercolors on Note Cards
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
---
END OF DIGEST
---
pwatkin1@houstonisd.org
leave-530762-284509.837a59848771871a059c6c214f9d00e3@lists.pub.getty.edu
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 08:03:26 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5
I have been reading the responses to copying and I just wanted to
give my 2 cents worth.  
In Art 4 I used to do an assignment in which we studied and
researched artists from the impressionist era.  They were to look at
many works from this period and pick an artist that they liked.  In
style, technique, colors used, themes or subject matter, etc.  They
were to plan out and use Craypas (Oil Pastel) to create the Next
painting that artist would do. Using similar subject matter, style
and technique.  This was a great challenge to them as they would try
to copy the artist's painting but I was not allowing them.  Some
would combine parts of painting to make a new one as in Cezanne's
still-life's or houses.  Some found resources of flowers, scenes or
things that the artists would use and likened them to a painting
already done.  Most found this to be challenging and had to study the
artist as well as come up with their next painting.  The Craypas was
a good media as it played into the dabbing style or smoothed out with
paint thinner.
I wrestled with this as copying but I tried to preface it with Art
History and not a copy of a single work.  The one's who were very
successful would include this piece with their A.P. work and even
used it as a concentration project.
I just thought that I would share this as a possible copying/original
project.
Ken Schwab
retired secondary
San Jose CA
--- Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
> Very well put Jeff. 
> 
> I deal with it simply - copying is just fine for
> practice, especially when learning difficult things
> like animal anatomy. 
> 
> Tracing is just fine too, as long as you are tracing
> your own original drawing, like for the purpose of
> transferring it to a nicer surface. No tracing of
> another artist's work, period. 
> 
> Nothing will be put on display that is copied from
> another artist's work. 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> Betty C Bowen
> printmaker, painter 
> art educator
> Cushing Oklahoma
> bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net
> http://www.bettybowenart.com
> http://bettycbowen.blogspot.com/
> 
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Seven Period Day Advise Needed
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 10:14:21 -0700
X-Message-Number: 6
Hi Joe, wow, 45 is even shorter than ours--53 min.  If it's a new
assignment and kids don't know what to do they need to sit and listen.
Normally if they're already started they should enter the room and get
their work and get busy.  I take roll after they are started--usually
around the middle of class (altho admin doesn't really like this).  I
give them a quick time toclean depending on how messy the work is.  For
pottery it's always a zoo because I have big classes (43 on my rolls!!)
and one sink.  When they're on the wheel I have them quit 15-20 min.
early to get their splash pans washed.  I have bath loofas to clean up
with (they're super) and brushes for their nails and hands and I usually
go back there for the first month and hurry everyone along.  I also help
them when they get behind.  I never pass out matierial--I have them
ready and they go pick them up.  Consequently I have to get organized
with supplies during the last part of the previous period.  I have 6
tables that are 4'x8' and then  a small table in the center for
supplies.  My desk and drawers are a supply station.  My chair is a
movable table.  You're going to hate it at first, but you get used to
anything
>>> <joe3cox@cox.net> 8/15/2008 11:49 am >>>
Hello All,
I teach high school and my school is going from an eight block schedule
where we had four classes a day that are 80 minutes long and we meet
ever other day, A day and B day.  To a 7 period day were classes are 45
minutes and we see the students everyday.  I have never taught in this
kind of schedule so this will be totally different for me.  
 
I teach Ceramic and Fundamentals of Art class so if you have made this
transition or teach with this type of schedule please pass on any
suggestions you have on how you run your class.  Suggestions on
lecturing, handing out supplies, cleaning up or any time saving advise
would be really appreciated.   
 
Hope everyone new school year is starting off great.
Blessings,
Joe
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----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 10:18:08 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7
Ken,
Thank you for an alternative to just simply copying.  Again it boils
down to what you want students to learn from an experience you found a
way to have it work in multiple ways working with an artist original
idea, challenging students to think outside the box. Great idea.
Jeff (minnesota)
 
> In Art 4 I used to do an assignment in which we studied and
> researched artists from the impressionist era.  They were
> to look at
> many works from this period and pick an artist that they
> liked.  In
> style, technique, colors used, themes or subject matter,
> etc.  They
> were to plan out and use Craypas (Oil Pastel) to create the
> Next
> painting that artist would do. Using similar subject
> matter, style
> and technique.  This was a great challenge to them as they
> would try
> to copy the artist's painting but I was not allowing
> them.  Some
> would combine parts of painting to make a new one as in
> Cezanne's
> still-life's or houses.  Some found resources of
> flowers, scenes or
> things that the artists would use and likened them to a
> painting
> already done.  Most found this to be challenging and had to
> study the
> artist as well as come up with their next painting.  The
> Craypas was
> a good media as it played into the dabbing style or
> smoothed out with
> paint thinner.
> 
> I wrestled with this as copying but I tried to preface it
> with Art
> History and not a copy of a single work.  The one's who
> were very
> successful would include this piece with their A.P. work
> and even
> used it as a concentration project.
> 
      
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Olympic Parade of Nations Art
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 12:17:24 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8
I see that NBC is offering the total package of the opening
ceremonies--$40.  Go to the NBC website
>>> Lauren <lvartteacher@gmail.com> 8/16/2008 2:40 pm >>>
I would love to find it too.  I checked out youtube, but did not see
that part of the ceremony.
On Wed, Aug 13, 2008 at 8:05 AM, Terry Marney <terrylou63@yahoo.com>
wrote:
> What a great idea, Cheryl!  You could use a large roll of white or
colored paper, give each student a choice of tools (tempera paint with
assorted brushes, string, fingers, or markers, colored pencils, etc....)
and have them "make their mark". You could even display the result and
call it "Olympic Parade of Art Students" or something. I didn't watch
the opening ceremony, and I've tried to google it and searched on
YouTube for the artwork...does anyone know where I can find that to show
my students?
---
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----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: donated item list-  cork?
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 12:22:22 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9
I used them one year to plug the bottom of salt and pepper shakers in
pottery.  It was
kind of difficult for the kids--they had to carve them.
My kids made me a trivit of wine corks  hot glued together and I have
seen them
used for bulletin boards (cut in rounds and glue to backboard).  None of
these
seem to rise above a crafts class.
>>> "Diane Beilby" <dibeilby@sbcglobal.net> 8/17/2008 5:48 am >>>
A friend has given me wine bottle cork for several years
can anyone share how they have used these
Diane
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Holmgren" <holmgren@lakedalelink.net>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Friday, August 15, 2008 1:55 PM
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] donated item list?
> Some additional items on my list are:
>
> paper grocery bags
> telephone wire
> plastic rectangular baby food containers and lids
> corks and film cannisters
> matboard scraps
> small wood chunks
> microwave dinner containers
> newspaper
> magazines
> egg cartons
>
> Mary H.
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html 
>
>
> -- 
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG. Version: 7.5.524 / Virus Database: 270.6.3/1611 -
Release 
> Date: 8/14/2008 6:20 AM
>
> 
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----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Learning by copying?
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 12:39:42 -0700
X-Message-Number: 10
My son had an interesting assignment.  He took a print by one artist and
had to reproduce
it in the style of another artist from another era.  He did the Rape of
Europa in the style
of keith haring.  Very cool result
>
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----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Seven Period Day Advise Needed
From: "Dobbelaere" <dobbe@tds.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 17:46:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11
That is my schedule  I teach everything Ceramics I  & II Photogrphy Arts
& 
Crafts Intro and Adv. art. & stagecraft.  we are divided into two
semesters 
but they still give me a ceramics class then a adv art where we are
drawing 
or painting and then back to ceramics never can they be together.  My
kids 
will wedge oned day then build or throw the next I usually assign proj
for 
the semester and they have to complete before the end   I may teach five
kids the wheel and help someone else with a hand built proj.  I have the
kids take a pic of thier house and recreate it in clay.  they have to
draw 
it first to scale then trace these on the clay to keep the scale  I show
them different tech for creating windows siding  and then at the same
time I 
may jump back over to a wheel student.  I give a 10 minute warning that
way 
some will start the clean up  and they are all responsible for there
space 
and if finished help a neighbor , some kids come in an work during study
hall and some stay after school ,if I am also.   It is hard to get much
done 
in that amount of time   I also do attend ance half way thru class  and
the 
evil princ. I have had the last two years (He is younger than my kids) 
follows my students to the room to inform me who was tardy!!  give me a 
break.  This same man is telling me that I cannot order glue bottles and
paint brushes because they are not consumables the kids don't take them
home 
with them.  What ever!!  they consume them and by the end of the year
glue 
bottle are clipped or cut and brushes are not that great either by the
end 
of the year ,  he asked me what I use leaded stained glass is for   I
said 
to make stained glass pieces and jewelry,   I have 25-30 per class and a
new 
batch in the spring  .  Do all of your supplies for your room come from
your 
student fees ?  Mine always has until this new guy came last year. The
other 
art teachers in our district still order that way but he wants me to
request 
the non consumable items from some other fund ( never had to do that
don't 
know what he is talking about)  I have taught for 19 years here.  Wow
you 
will probaly miss those long periods that would be heaven in the art
room.
Sandy Dobbelaere
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Monday, August 18, 2008 1:14 PM
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Seven Period Day Advise Needed
Hi Joe, wow, 45 is even shorter than ours--53 min.  If it's a new
assignment 
and kids don't know what to do they need to sit and listen.  Normally if
they're already started they should enter the room and get their work
and 
get busy.  I take roll after they are started--usually around the middle
of 
class (altho admin doesn't really like this).  I give them a quick time 
toclean depending on how messy the work is.  For pottery it's always a
zoo 
because I have big classes (43 on my rolls!!) and one sink.  When
they're on 
the wheel I have them quit 15-20 min. early to get their splash pans
washed. 
I have bath loofas to clean up with (they're super) and brushes for
their 
nails and hands and I usually go back there for the first month and
hurry 
everyone along.  I also help them when they get behind.  I never pass
out 
matierial--I have them ready and they go pick them up.  Consequently I
have 
to get organized with supplies during the last part of the previous
period. 
I have 6 tables that are 4'x8' and then  a small table in the center for
supplies.  My desk and drawers are a supply station.  My chair is a
movable 
table.  You're going to hate it at first, but you get used to anything
>>> <joe3cox@cox.net> 8/15/2008 11:49 am >>>
Hello All,
I teach high school and my school is going from an eight block schedule 
where we had four classes a day that are 80 minutes long and we meet
ever 
other day, A day and B day.  To a 7 period day were classes are 45
minutes 
and we see the students everyday.  I have never taught in this kind of 
schedule so this will be totally different for me.
I teach Ceramic and Fundamentals of Art class so if you have made this 
transition or teach with this type of schedule please pass on any 
suggestions you have on how you run your class.  Suggestions on
lecturing, 
handing out supplies, cleaning up or any time saving advise would be
really 
appreciated.
Hope everyone new school year is starting off great.
Blessings,
Joe
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Subject: fractals lesson plan and tools in a bag drawing activity
From: "Julie" <picturejbd6@comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 18:31:08 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12
Hi all,
Anyone come across the Vivian Komando fractals lesson plan yet or by any
chance?
And... I found a first day activity on some website (IAD?) where kitchen
tools or art tools were put in a plain lunch bag and students had to put
their hands in and draw by touch.  Now I can't find it anywhere and I
was 
thinking of using this with medical tools for my first day of the
nursing 
academy.  Does this ring a bell with anyone and where might I find this 
lesson?
Thank you.
Jules 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Olympic Parade of Nations Art
From: "Diane Beilby" <dibeilby@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 17:34:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13
Cheryl
Thank you for the idea!!
I put out a long white strip of paper and ten cups of paint and brushes.
First day of class - We had a very short intro class today so this fit 
perfectly, giving the students a chance to use a little paint.
I had instructions right inside the door.
Pick a color and draw a line (any kind of line) from one end of the
sheet to 
the other.
I followed this telling students that art is influenced by what is
happening 
in the world.  I asked students if they know what had inspired this 
painting.  In every class one or two students had the answer.
It looks really good and I am going to hang it in the hall tomorrow.  I
am 
happy that they each have a part in this huge painting created in one
day! 
All succeed!!
now I am trying to think of the perfect title
Diane Beilby
Kirksey Middle School (formally 6th-7th, new year 6th,7th, 8th)
Rogers, AR
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Cheryl Lloyd" <clloyd@ceres.k12.ca.us>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, August 12, 2008 3:43 PM
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Olympic Parade of Nations Art
If you watched the Opening Ceremonies of the Olympics, you could see
that each athlete left a mark across the painting during the parade of
nations.  Each athlete was a part of the painting and left a personal
mark that created a work of art.
I am trying to think of a way to welcome my students on the first day of
school (tomorrow, of course I don't think of these things earlier) in
the same manner.  I would like them to leave their mark simply by
entering the room.  Does anyone have any ideas?
Cheri Lloyd
Art Teacher/ Beginning Teacher Mentor
Whitmore Charter School of the Arts and Technology
3435 Don Pedro Road
Ceres, CA  95307
209.556.1610
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----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Corks and copying
From: Heidi McElroy <hmcelroy@naxs.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 19:01:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14
Adding my two cents worth (not worth that much)
Corks- one year my students drew "The Kingdom of Cork" - all the
subjects
had cork bodies and clothes and costumes.
Copying - isn't that what copiers are for?
Heidi in VA
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Optical illusion coloring pages?
From: Lisa Teske <lisa_teske@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 21:08:54 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 15
I am putting together a bulletin board of optical illusions and would
like to add some activity ideas and coloring pages for them to take.
Does anyone know of some optical illusion coloring pages available
on-line?  I can find great books to purchase, but want them for
tomorrow...
Thanks!
Lisa
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