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Re: [teacherartexchange] if I was a mean coordinator... rubric

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From: Patricia Knott (pknott_6_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Aug 17 2008 - 08:57:16 PDT


Thanks from me too Ellen

I just ordered the book and hope I can make my agenda for my
department from it for the entire year. I'm a big fan of Wiggins and
McTighe

>>> Wormeli's fourth belief is that academic grades should
>>> be a direct reflection of mastery. This means that factors such as
>>> effort, behavior, and attendance should not be included in
>>> calculating grades
>>> (chapter eight). It also means that students should be allowed to
>>> redo work without penalty (chapter ten) and should not be graded on
>>> homework

This seems to be a tough concept for many teachers. I went through a
new middle school grading creation this past year and I found it very
hard for the teachers to separate behaviors ( and mostly it was bad
behaviors) from judging the skills and understanding. Someday
soon I hope somebody comes up with this kind of guide just for art.
Often the general learning patterns in art have nothing to do with
what happens in other classes and I think that is what makes it so
difficult for us in art to follow what every one else is told should
be.

I'm a big believer in giving problems to solve and asking lots of
questions and then only worrying about the product after the student
tackles all the questions. That can take a long time, and progress
can be in inches. With my talented students it's often easy to get
them to redo and revise. With the rest, my biggest weakness is the
student who does something just to get by and could care less about
making it better. I have plenty of high school kids who are
satisfied with a "D" just to get by, and then attitude and behavior
does play a role.

Patty

On Aug 16, 2008, at 11:17 PM, Jeff Pridie wrote:

> Ellen,
>
> Thank you for this jewel of information. The levels of creativity
> you mentioned and the book I am looking forward to further research
> on and reading. Great points in the information you provided.
>
> Jeff (Minnesota)
>
>
>
>> From: Sears, Ellen <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] if I was a mean coordinator... rubric
>> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
>> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>> Date: Saturday, August 16, 2008, 7:33 PM
>> "if I was a mean coordinator, I would make a rubric
>> that evaluated my
>> teacher's lessons and expectations."
>>
>> I don't think that would make you a mean coordinator.
>> A rubric is for
>> all parties - they help me put into words what I am
>> assessing, and they
>> help the kids understand my expectations. I am reading a
>> book that has
>> helped me verbalize what I do in my room. I have never
>> highlighted or
>> put post-it notes in a book - this one is filled with
>> both....
>>
>> As for assessing creativity - I like to use the levels of
>> creativity...
>>
>> Levels of creativity
>> The first three levels of creativity can be attained by
>> anyone who is
>> motivated and who has persistence enough to see projects
>> and ideas
>> through. The last two levels may be unattainable to all but
>> those who
>> are highly gifted creatively, or those who are naturally
>> creative
>> geniuses.
>> 1. Primitive and intuitive expression:
>> 2. Academic and technical level:
>> 3. Inventive level:
>> 4. Innovative level:
>> 5. Genius level:
>>
>> As for the book:
>>
>> "Fair isn't Always Equal"
>> Rick Wormeli
>>
>> "Wormeli has four beliefs that drive his book. His
>> first belief is that
>> differentiation is an effective mechanism for student
>> learning.
>> Wormeli's definition of differentiation is compatible
>> with Tomlinson's
>> (2001) definition of work that is tiered up or down based
>> on student
>> abilities. Wormeli is an advocate for focusing instruction
>> and
>> assessment on standards. He does not advocate particular
>> standards, but
>> he suggests that whatever standards are used should be
>> prioritized in
>> terms of important concepts and skills. This means that
>> "fluff"
>> assignments should never be given (pp. 34-35).
>>
>> The author's second belief is that the goal of
>> education is mastery of
>> the skills and important concepts that have been
>> established for
>> students to learn. Because the question of what should be
>> mastered is
>> beyond the scope of the book, Wormeli focuses on the
>> criteria for the
>> evidence of mastery. This section is influenced by Wiggins
>> & McTighe
>> (2005). (Readers desiring more background on what
>> constitutes evidence
>> of mastery should consult chapter seven of their
>> Understanding by
>> Design.)
>>
>> The third belief driving the book is that assessment should
>> be used as a
>> tool to inform instructional decisions. Readers will come
>> away with a
>> clear understanding of the role of pre-assessments,
>> formative
>> assessments, and summative assessments in a differentiated
>> classroom.
>> Readers wanting broader coverage of the relationship of
>> assessment to
>> instruction should consult Popham (2003).
>>
>> Wormeli's fourth belief is that academic grades should
>> be a direct
>> reflection of mastery. This means that factors such as
>> effort, behavior,
>> and attendance should not be included in calculating grades
>> (chapter
>> eight). It also means that students should be allowed to
>> redo work
>> without penalty (chapter ten) and should not be graded on
>> homework (pp.
>> 116-120). For broader coverage on the topic of grading
>> readers should
>> consult Marzano (2000) or Guskey & Bailey (2001).
>>
>> Education Book Review
>>
>> Getting ready for our second week of school,
>> Ellen
>>
>>
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>
>
>
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