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[teacherartexchange] Ten Lessons the Arts Teach

---------

From: Diane Gregory (gregory.diane55_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Aug 13 2008 - 10:22:28 PDT


Hi Guys,

This fall in my elementary art methods class for Art Education majors we are embarking on a project to tell real stories about the significance of visual art in our lives. We will use the "Ten Lessons that the Arts Teach" by Elliot Eisner that is published on the NAEA web site as a starting point. See below.

I will ask each student to write a brief personal story for any and all the statements or lessons that the Arts teach according to Eisner. These can be personal accounts that verify the statement and keep a personal explanation about the truth and power of the statement. They can be studio oriented, art history oriented, etc. We will collect the stories, edit them, and circulate them back to this list for further comment. Perhaps, if it works out, we can submit it to publication for School Arts or some other venue. I anticipate that this project will go on for several weeks. I hope these students can then create a PowerPoint presentation or some other work that can be used by them and others to describe the value of an education in art more authentically and powerfully. Students can then use this material to advocate for their own art programs and I believe the stories will stick with them and strengthen and transform their own understanding of
 the value of an education in art. Many times beginning art teachers are lost for words to articulate the value of an education in art and I hope this project will help them give voice to what lies in their minds, hearts, and souls.

Please join us in our storytelling. I have found that advocacy statements like Eisner's truly come to life when artists and art teachers tell their stories and provide examples of these fine statements. Eisner is so good at articulating the value of our message. Now we can do what we do best...adding the details and our stories about how these are reality and not just pie in the sky.

I have published the ten statements below. If you care to contribute, please do so on this list rather than sending private email. The idea is to have a collective discussion about this. Perhaps we could even extend this later to other discussion lists and provide testimonies about the value of the arts. Whatever you contribute will be given to my students and perhaps we can engage in a collaborative project together.

Thanks,

Diane

Ten Lessons the Arts Teach*
By Elliot Eisner

The arts teach children to make good judgments about qualitative relationships.
Unlike much of the curriculum in which correct answers and rules prevail, in the arts, it
is judgment rather than rules that prevail.

The arts teach children that problems can have more than one solution and that questions can have more than one answer.

The arts celebrate multiple perspectives.
One of their large lessons is that there are many ways to see and interpret the world.

The arts teach children that in complex forms of problem solving.
purposes are seldom fixed, but change with circumstance and opportunity. Learning in the arts requires the ability and a willingness to surrender to the unanticipated possibilities of the work as it unfolds.

The arts make vivid the fact that neither words in their literal form nor number exhaust what we can know. The limits of our language do not define the limits of our cognition.

The arts teach students that small differences can have large effects.
The arts traffic in subtleties.

The arts teach students to think through and within a material.
All art forms employ some means through which images become real.

The arts help children learn to say what cannot be said.
When children are invited to disclose what a work of art helps them feel, they must reach into their poetic capacities to find the words that will do the job.

The arts enable us to have experience we can have from no other source.
and through such experience to discover the range and variety of what we are capable of feeling.

The arts’ position in the school curriculum symbolizes to the young what adults believe is important.

*SOURCE: Eisner, E. (2002). The Arts and the Creation of Mind, In Chapter 4, What the Arts Teach and How It Shows. (pp. 70-92). Yale University Press. Available from NAEA Publications. NAEA grants reprint permission for this excerpt from Ten Lessons with proper acknowledgment of its source and NAEA.

Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Associate Professor of Art Education
Director, Undergraduate and Graduate
Studies in Art Education
dgregory@mail.twu.edu

--- On Tue, 8/12/08, Niccy Pallant <nicnakpotplant@gmail.com> wrote:

> From: Niccy Pallant <nicnakpotplant@gmail.com>
> Subject: Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: August 11, 2008
> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Cc: "mrwoodyz@yahoo.com" <mrwoodyz@yahoo.com>
> Date: Tuesday, August 12, 2008, 10:10 AM
> Hi there, I joined you all after a middle schooling
> conference where
> the website was mentioned. I am an art/ multimedia &
> drama teacher on
> adelaide, south Australia. I am also a middle school
> manager.
> I have been prompted to join the shoe discussions. Last
> year I
> exchanged with an art teacher in Denver colorado and
> witnessed a great
> interdisciplinary unit linking woody's holocaust
> memorial project and
> clay. Woody's dad was the only survivor of a massacre
> and woody has
> been collecting shoes to represent the victims. Beth - the
> art teacher
> got kids to create little childrens and adults shoes. Very
> powerful to
> see the little hand made baby shoes. Woody's project is
> here if you'd
> like to help: www.holocaustshoeproject.org
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On 12/08/2008, at 5:30 PM, "TeacherArtExchange
> Discussion Group
> digest" <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> wrote:
>
> > TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, August 11, 2008.
> >
> > 1. Yahoo! Auto Response
> > 2. Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 09, 2008
> > 3. On My August Blog
> >
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Yahoo! Auto Response
> > From: artgal50@sbcglobal.net
> > Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 01:03:47 -0700 (PDT)
> > X-Message-Number: 1
> >
> > I will be in Florida visiting with my mom. She has
> fallen and
> > broken a bone in her spine. She has had a procedure to
> mend the
> > break but I am not sure what the situation is.
> > Hope all is well.
> > I will keep you updated.
> > Keep us in your prayers
> > Love
> > Barb
> >
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 09,
> 2008
> > From: Socorro Mucino <socorromm@yahoo.com>
> > Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 07:51:41 -0700 (PDT)
> > X-Message-Number: 2
> >
> > Regarding clay clean-up:
> > I teach high school, Art 1 in Chicago's west side.
> I
> > usually assign clean-up tasks by groups of 4, in alph
> > order and enter a grade for their efforts. About 5 to
> > 6 minutes before the end of class (I assign someone to
> > call time!) Two people collect supplies in a bucket
> > with water (helps to soak the clay off the tools,)
> > they brings tools over to the sink, third person
> > rinses off tools. In the mean time, the fourth person
> > wipes down tables. While all this is going on,
> > students are putting away thier works in progress, and
> > lining up to wash hands. So my sink dont clog with
> > clay, students first rinse hands in a bucket before
> > washing them at the sink. All the clay water goes into
> > a large bucket (the type used for contractors or get
> > them at home Depot). When clay settles, top layer is
> > dumped into the sink and the clay water is thrown
> > down the toilet at the end of the day.
> > It's not perfect but I can keep track of the
> "cleanup
> > crew" and they pressure the others not to leave a
> mess
> > for them.
> > Socorro
> > --- TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
> > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
> >
> >> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, August 09,
> >> 2008.
> >>
> >> 1. RE: Crazy Art Teacher/shoe lesson plans
> >> 2. Re: staff development for the arts ideas
> >> 3. Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 08, 2008
> >> 4. Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 08, 2008
> >> 5. Re: Re:teacherartexchange digest: August 08,
> 2008
> >> 6. Re: clay cleanup
> >> 7. old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> 8. floppy books
> >> 9. RE: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> 10. Re: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> 11. Re: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> 12. RE: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> 13. Re: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> 14. Andy Warhol Sketchbook Images
> >> 15. RE: Andy Warhol Sketchbook Images
> >> 16. RE: Andy Warhol Sketchbook Images
> >> 17. Re:teacherartexchange digest: August 08, 2008
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: RE: Crazy Art Teacher/shoe lesson plans
> >> From: "familyerickson"
> <familyerickson@cox.net>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 06:39:11 -0500
> >> X-Message-Number: 1
> >>
> >> oooh Ruby! I love it! Thanks for sharing shoes!
> >> Please continue to
> >> share with us your recycled art ideas. I'm
> sure
> >> many of us will enjoy
> >> hearing them.
> >> Cindy, the Crazy Art Teacher (although I think
> many
> >> of us out there could
> >> share this title!)
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: Ruby Re-Usable
> [mailto:rubyreusable@gmail.com]
> >> Sent: Friday, August 08, 2008 10:58 PM
> >> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> >> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Crazy Art
> Teacher/shoe
> >> lesson plans
> >>
> >>
> >> Just got back from vacation and wanted to respond
> to
> >> crazy art teacher
> >> shoes, I am a "teaching artist" in the
> schools
> >> (Washington State
> >> Arts Commission roster of artists), my specialty
> is
> >> art from recycled
> >> materials, and I try to wear entire outfits
> >> illustrating the "reduce,
> >> reuse, recycle" message in as artsy a way as
> is
> >> comfortable, ala "Miss
> >> Frizzle" from Magic School Bus. The
> students' and
> >> teachers'
> >> responses are always positive, and I believe it is
> a
> >> way to "walk the
> >> walk" in an appropriately visual way.
> >>
> >> For a special treat, I wear my "Dale Chihuly
> Shoes,"
> >> which were
> >> splattered by Dale himself, using Golden brand
> >> acrylics that are
> >> labeled "special Chihuly fluids" (for
> reals, I have
> >> a bottle). More
> >> info/pics HERE
> (www.rubyreusable.com/artblog/?p=80)
> >>
> >> I do a whole unit about shoes, from line drawings
> to
> >> imaginary shoe
> >> ads to creating 3-D sculptural shoes from recycled
> >> materials; there is
> >> so much to learn about civilization (both western
> >> and eastern) through
> >> the study of evolving footwear, along with shoes
> in
> >> fine art (ala Andy
> >> Warhol and ??)
> >>
> >> anyone else do shoes as a subject/lesson/unit?
> >>
> >> ps the Fuller Craft Museum (www.fullercraft.org/)
> is
> >> reaching out to
> >> artists of every craft media for an upcoming
> >> exhibition The Perfect
> >> Fit - Shoes Tell Stories, an exhibition exploring
> >> how shoes can tell
> >> stories, addressing topics such as gender,
> history,
> >> sexuality, race,
> >> class, and culture.
> >>
> >> love, etc Ruby
> >> rubyreusable@gmail.com
> >> Olympia Dumpster Divers, THE blog for recycled
> art!
> >> www.rubyreusable.com/artblog
> >>
> >> ---
> >> To unsubscribe go to
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>
> >> No virus found in this incoming message.
> >> Checked by AVG.
> >> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.0/1601 -
> >> Release Date: 8/8/2008
> >> 9:02 AM
> >>
> >> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> >> Checked by AVG.
> >> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.0/1601 -
> >> Release Date: 8/8/2008
> >> 9:02 AM
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re: staff development for the arts ideas
> >> From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 08:09:39 -0400
> >> X-Message-Number: 2
> >>
> >>> Gabrielle in Minneapolis wrote:
> >>>
> >>> I am looking for some GOOD professional
> development
> >> models for staff development for the
> >>> arts. I work in a pay for performance school
> and
> >> currently I have to implement a lot of
> >>> reading strategies and other things to
> "prove" that
> >> I am a good teacher and doing my work.
> >>> So, when I did the schedule last spring, I
> wrote it
> >> so that all of the arts staff (2 visual art, 2
> >>> media arts and 2 graphics teachers) meet at
> the
> >> same time for our "professional
> >>> development" time. Now, I would like to
> find a
> >> model where we could work on improving our
> >>> arts instruction instead of these building
> wide
> >> reading things. Anyone know of anything?
> >>
> >> It is great that you are able to include
> >> professional development.
> >>
> >> As part of professional development, might
> identify
> >> what is learned in studio art classes that is not
> >> being learned in other parts of the curriculum?
> What
> >> is learned in studio art classes that is helpful
> for
> >> everybody's success in life? Are the state and
> >> federal art standards the most important things
> that
> >> should actually be learned in art classes, or are
> >> their ways of learning and skills that are not
> >> covered in the standards? To what extent should
> >> studio art be learned through self-constructed
> >> knowledge vs. the behavior management of
> prescribed
> >> assignments and "followed the
> directions" rubrics?
> >> How do art students respond to various art teacher
> >> dispositions and personalities? How are student
> >> minds developed in art classes? What are the
> unique
> >> kinds of brain neurons nurtured by the different
> >> instructional approaches used in an art studio?
> How
> >> have the best artists in the world learned to
> become
> >> the world's best artists? What are the issues
> that
> >> art teachers would like to inv
> >> estigate in their classrooms? What about forming a
> >> list of basic art learning topics/issues and
> invite
> >> art teachers to select the topics they are willing
> >> to study (and conduct classroom experiments) and
> >> help the other teachers become familiar with their
> >> topic?
> >>
> >> Marvin Bartel
> >>
> >> Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
> >> Adjunct in Art Education
> >> Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
> >> studio phone: 574-533-0171
> >>
> >> Art & Learning to Think & Feel (Home Page
> in Art
> >> Education)
> >> www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
> >>
> >> "We need to remember that we are created
> creative
> >> and can invent new scenarios as frequently as they
> >> are needed." -- Maya Angelou
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 08,
> >> 2008
> >> From: Terry Marney <terrylou63@yahoo.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 08:42:33 -0700 (PDT)
> >> X-Message-Number: 3
> >>
> >> Hi all. I've been teaching art at the high
> school
> >> level for a few years now and am looking for ideas
> >> for my clay class. It's an introductory level
> class.
> >> I'm looking for suggestions on how to get
> students
> >> to pitch in and be responsible for clay cleanup.
> We
> >> have a recycled clay bin, which nobody ever wants
> to
> >> mix. Nobody ever wants to load the plaster trough
> >> with wet recycled clay. Clay tools are haphazardly
> >> cleaned and left wherever. How do others make
> kids
> >> accountable for those types of jobs without
> >> constantly nagging? I've tried making a poster
> to
> >> keep track of who does what. I've told them
> that
> >> studio maintenance is worth 25% of their grade.
> They
> >> just don't take it seriously and then are
> shocked
> >> when their grades aren't great. Any
> suggestions? I'd
> >> love to look at any rubrics or other ideas!Terry
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 08,
> >> 2008
> >> From: Socorro Mucino <socorromm@yahoo.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 08:54:03 -0700 (PDT)
> >> X-Message-Number: 4
> >>
> >> Re: Shoes
> >> The Field Museum in Chicago has a fabulous exhibit
> >> about the history of shoes.
> >> http://www.fieldmuseum.org
> >> Socorro
> >> Chicago Public Schools
> >>
> >> --- TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
> >> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> wrote:
> >>
> >>> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Friday, August
> 08,
> >>> 2008.
> >>>
> >>> 1. Yahoo! Auto Response
> >>> 2. Re: sketch/scrapbook
> >>> 3. Re: staff development for the arts
> >>> 4. Google Teacher Academy - Chicago
> >>> 5. Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 07,
> 2008
> >>> 6. Re: staff development for the arts
> >>> 7. Crazy Art Teacher/shoe lesson plans
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>> Subject: Yahoo! Auto Response
> >>> From: chellejhnsn@sbcglobal.net
> >>> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 01:17:29 -0700 (PDT)
> >>> X-Message-Number: 1
> >>>
> >>> At the beach!
> >>> Have a great day! :)
> >>>
> >>> Michelle
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>> Subject: Re: sketch/scrapbook
> >>> From: marcia <marciadotcom@yahoo.com>
> >>> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 04:10:13 -0700 (PDT)
> >>> X-Message-Number: 2
> >>>
> >>> Marcia,
> >>> Thanks for the great idea, I'm going to
> try the
> >>> color swatch collages as an ongoing project
> for
> >> kids
> >>> who finish early. Very cool!
> >>>
> >>> Marcia in WI
> >>> P.S. You probably don't remember me, but I
> >> observed
> >>> in your classroom years ago while I was at
> ISU..
> >>> which was always a fun time!
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> -------------------------
> >>>>
> >>>> Subject: Re: sketch/scrapbook
> >>>> From: mbhirst@aol.com
> >>>> Date: Thu, 07 Aug 2008 09:06:49 -0400
> >>>> X-Message-Number: 2
> >>>>
> >>>> Yes! I do the same thing and I try to get
> my
> >>> Senior studio
> >>>> and AP
> >>>> students to keep some kind of daily book
> page,
> >>> too.
> >>>> If nothing "comes to us" for the
> day, we just
> >>>> tear color swatches from
> >>>> magazines and create color pages----adding
> a
> >>> little at a
> >>>> time i.e. I
> >>>> have a page for each color wheel color and
> add
> >> to
> >>> them for
> >>>> months. Some
> >>>> of my kids even do pages of natural
> textures or
> >>> black and
> >>>> white line
> >>>> images or school colors (yuck), etc. The
> >> collages
> >>> become
> >>>> beautiful
> >>>> accumulations of these patches. Some
> students
> >>> pattern them,
> >>>> some are
> >>>> random, some organize them, some cut out
> >> objects,
> >>> some just
> >>>> use
> >>>> patches, etc.
> >>>> Marcia
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>> Subject: Re: staff development for the arts
> >>> From: Marvin Bartel
> <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
> >>> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 10:08:55 -0400
> >>> X-Message-Number: 3
> >>>
> >>> Wilbur,
> >>> This looks okay.
> >>> Marvin
> >>>
> >>>> Hi everyone,
> >>>>
> >>>> I am looking for some GOOD professional
> >> development
> >>> models for staff development for the
> >>>> arts. I work in a pay for performance
> school and
> >>> currently I have to implement a lot of
> >>>> reading strategies and other things to
> "prove"
> >> that
> >>> I am a good teacher and doing my work.
> >>>> So, when I did the schedule last spring, I
> wrote
> >> it
> >>> so that all of the arts staff (2 visual art, 2
> >>>> media arts and 2 graphics teachers) meet
> at the
> >>> same time for our "professional
> >>>> development" time. Now, I would like
> to find a
> >>> model where we could work on improving our
> >>>> arts instruction instead of these building
> wide
> >>> reading things. Anyone know of anything?
> >>>>
> >>>> Thanks so much,
> >>>> Gabrielle in Minneapolis
> >>>> ----- Original Message -----
> >>>> From: mbhirst@aol.com
> >>>> Date: Thursday, August 7, 2008 8:06 am
> >>>> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange]
> >> sketch/scrapbook
> >>>>
> >>>>> Yes! I do the same thing and I try to
> get my
> >>> Senior studio and AP
> >>>>> students to keep some kind of daily
> book page,
> >>> too.
> >>>>> If nothing "comes to us" for
> the day, we just
> >>> tear color swatches
> >>>>> from
> >>>>> magazines and create color
> pages----adding a
> >>> little at a time i.e.
> >>>>> I
> >>>>> have a page for each color wheel color
> and add
> >> to
> >>> them for months.
> >>>>> Some
> >>>>> of my kids even do pages of natural
> textures or
> >>> black and white
> >>>>> line
> >>>>> images or school colors (yuck), etc.
> The
> >> collages
> >>> become beautiful
> >>>>> accumulations of these patches. Some
> students
> >>> pattern them, some
> >>>>> are
> >>>>> random, some organize them, some cut
> out
> >> objects,
> >>> some just use
> >>>>> patches, etc.
> >>>>> Marcia
> >>>>>
> >>>>> -----Original Message-----
> >>>>> From: christy hedman
> <christyhedman@yahoo.com>
> >>>>> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion
> Group
> >>>>>
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> >>>>> Sent: Thu, 7 Aug 2008 6:38 am
> >>>>> Subject: [teacherartexchange]
> sketch/scrapbook
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Lesa,
> >>>>> Your scrap/sketchbooks sound
> wonderful. THey do
> >>> remind me a little
> >>>>> of
> >>>>> the boxes
> >>>>> of stuff ANdy WArhol collected. If you
> ever get
> >>> to Pittsburgh, I
> >>>>> think
> >>>>> they
> >>>>> have them archived and stored at the
> Warhol
> >>> museum(reciepts,
> >>>>> napkins,
> >>>>> sketches,
> >>>>> shoes...). I would love to see how you
> attached
> >>> those flattened
> >>>>> glasses
> >>>>> to your
> >>>>> book. I guess the idea strikes me so
> much
> >> because
> >>> it is a very
> >>>>> personalreflection of your day/life.
> When an
> >>> outsider looks at your
> >>>>> gum
> >>>>> wrappers, she
> >>>>> only sees gum arappers, but you see
> what, who,
> >>> where you were when
> >>>>> you
> >>>>> were
> >>>>> chewing th
> >>>>> at gum! For me, my art is made up of
> so much of
> >>> my past
> >>>>> experiences
> >>>>> and it takes some time for them to
> reveal
> >>> themselsves to me. But
> >>>>> you
> >>>>> have it all
> >>>>> right there! It sounds almost magical.
> If you
> >>> ever post them
> >>>>> online,
> >>>>> please let
> >>>>> us know!
> >>>>> Christy
> >>>>> ---
> >>>>> Another project relates to
> artist's sketchbook.
> >> I
> >>> wish the sketchbook
> >>>>> would work with me! It doesn't. So
> I've found
> >> one
> >>> that does. I call it
> >>>>> my
> >>>>> stuff diaries.. its a cross between an
> artist's
> >>> sketchbook, scrapbook
> >>>>> (clippings), journal (sort of), travel
> diary..
> >>> etc. This started in
> >>>>> 2002for me when I travelled to study
> in
> >> England,
> >>> and it continues
> >>>>> today.
> >>>>> This process is a matter of filling
> >> sketchbooks,
> >>> scrapbooks, old
> >>>>> books,with common and unique things
> found,
> >>> personal traces,
> >>>>> wrappers from fast
> >>>>> food I ate, receipts, family photos,
> from the
> >>> mundane, pop culture,
> >>>>> collages, etc. It seems to be an
> ongoing
> >>> project.. This seems very
> >>>>> unartistic, since the media is not
> traditional
> >>> except for the
> >>>>> sketchbook.
> >>>>> I collect things in my pockets and
> bags, at the
> >>> end of the day they
> >>>>> areemptied, and later layer pages or
> begin new
> >>> ones. It might have
> >>>>> come to
> >>>>> an
> >>>>> end recently because I've been
> living in the
> >> same
> >>> place for a few
> >>>>> years,but it continues. I have some
> ideas about
> >>> showing them, if it
> >>>>> happens..Its a curious thing for me,
> and
> >>> interesting to look back
> >>>>> at the early
> >>>>> books. The feelings or memories are
> different
> >>> much more direct and
> >>>>> surface
> >>>>> quickly about the grocery sto
> >>>>> res, the sidewalk, the city corner
> where I
> >>>>> picked up the flatten glasses. Very
> different
> >>> than say the photo
> >>>>> album.I've become abit of a
> >> sketchbook/scrapbook
> >>> hound as well so I
> >>>>> peruse
> >>>>> every
> >>>>> dollar shop for them so I have many
> choices to
> >>> begin a new book.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> enuf already, but thanks for the space
> to let
> >>> some of this out.
> >>>>> Lesa
> >>>>>
> >>>>> --web based art projects and education
> >> projects--
> >>>>> www.exhibit905.info--
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> ---
> >>>>> To unsubscribe go to
> >>>>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>>>>
> >>>>>
> >>>>> ---
> >>>>> To unsubscribe go to
> >>>>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> ---
> >>>> To unsubscribe go to
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>> Subject: Google Teacher Academy - Chicago
> >>> From: Ray Leal <rayleal@earthlink.net>
> >>> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 09:37:52 -0700
> >>> X-Message-Number: 4
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Google has announced the next Google Teacher
> >> Academy
> >>> will take place
> >>> in Chicago, Sept. 24. Applications are due by
> Aug.
> >>> 24. I participated
> >>> a year ago in Los Angeles and it was an
> absolutely
> >>> great experience. I
> >>> would like to encourage you to go to the
> google
> >> site
> >>> and check it out-
> >>> then get busy and apply!
> >>> http://www.google.com/educators/gta.html
> >>> Heather
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>> Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: August
> 07,
> >>> 2008
> >>> From: "Lois Girbino"
> <lgirbino@gmail.com>
> >>> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 13:53:23 -0400
> >>> X-Message-Number: 5
> >>>
> >>> Aaron- go to art ed 2.0 (google for address),
> >> which
> >>> has a great online
> >>> community, including groups specifically for
> >> digital
> >>> arts & animation;
> >>> they have lots of resources.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>> Subject: Re: staff development for the arts
> >>> From: Marvin Bartel
> <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
> >>> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 16:47:38 -0400
> >>> X-Message-Number: 6
> >>>
> >>> I am sorry, but my previous message with this
> text
> >>> was sent by mistake.
> >>>
> >>>> Wilbur,
> >>>> This looks okay.
> >>>> Marvin
> >>>
> >>> I will send the correct response to follow.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>>
> >>> Subject: Crazy Art Teacher/shoe lesson plans
> >>> From: "Ruby Re-Usable"
> <rubyreusable@gmail.com>
> >>> Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 20:58:02 -0700
> >>> X-Message-Number: 7
> >>>
> >>> Just got back from vacation and wanted to
> respond
> >> to
> >>> crazy art teacher
> >>> shoes, I am a "teaching artist" in
> the schools
> >>> (Washington State
> >>> Arts Commission roster of artists), my
> specialty
> >> is
> >>> art from recycled
> >>> materials, and I try to wear entire outfits
> >>> illustrating the "reduce,
> >>> reuse, recycle" message in as artsy a way
> as is
> >>> comfortable, ala "Miss
> >>> Frizzle" from Magic School Bus. The
> students'
> >> and
> >>> teachers'
> >>> responses are always positive, and I believe
> it is
> >> a
> >>> way to "walk the
> >>> walk" in an appropriately visual way.
> >>>
> >>> For a special treat, I wear my "Dale
> Chihuly
> >> Shoes,"
> >>> which were
> >>> splattered by Dale himself, using Golden brand
> >>> acrylics that are
> >>> labeled "special Chihuly fluids"
> (for reals, I
> >> have
> >>> a bottle). More
> >>> info/pics HERE
> >> (www.rubyreusable.com/artblog/?p=80)
> >>>
> >>> I do a whole unit about shoes, from line
> drawings
> >> to
> >>> imaginary shoe
> >>> ads to creating 3-D sculptural shoes from
> recycled
> >>> materials; there is
> >>> so much to learn about civilization (both
> western
> >>> and eastern) through
> >>> the study of evolving footwear, along with
> shoes
> >> in
> >>> fine art (ala Andy
> >>> Warhol and ??)
> >>>
> >>> anyone else do shoes as a subject/lesson/unit?
> >>>
> >>> ps the Fuller Craft Museum
> (www.fullercraft.org/)
> >> is
> >>> reaching out to
> >>> artists of every craft media for an upcoming
> >>> exhibition The Perfect
> >>> Fit - Shoes Tell Stories, an exhibition
> exploring
> >>> how shoes can tell
> >>> stories, addressing topics such as gender,
> >> history,
> >>> sexuality, race,
> >>> class, and culture.
> >>>
> >>> love, etc Ruby
> >>> rubyreusable@gmail.com
> >>> Olympia Dumpster Divers, THE blog for recycled
> >> art!
> >>> www.rubyreusable.com/artblog
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ---
> >>>
> >>> END OF DIGEST
> >>>
> >>> ---
> teacherartexchange
> >>> as: socorromm@yahoo.com
> >>>
> >>
> >
> leave-524665-229430.e531e0484c8fd095ec61483753422223@lists.pub.getty.edu
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >> Socorro
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re: Re:teacherartexchange digest: August
> >> 08, 2008
> >> From: "M. Austin"
> <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 11:13:08 -0500
> >> X-Message-Number: 5
> >>
> >> I don't let my students leave the room until
> it is
> >> cleaned up. I don't care
> >> if another class is standing outside the door. I
> >> don't care if my entire
> >> class is late to their next class or miss the bus
> or
> >> whatever. They made the
> >> mess, they are responsible. Don't accept their
> >> apathy. If they don't recycle
> >> their clay they don't have clay to work with,
> thus
> >> they fail the class. If
> >> tools are left out I clean them and lock them up.
> If
> >> they don't have tools
> >> to work with that is not my problem. When they get
> >> down to using their own
> >> pencils as tools because that is all that is left
> >> they'll get the message. I
> >> call it tough love, and it works. I used to drive
> >> myself crazy trying to
> >> keep the room clean. Not anymore. Another thing I
> do
> >> is I issue a baggie of
> >> tools to each student. If they lose them there is
> a
> >> $$ amount posted on the
> >> wall. Students are responsible for them and at the
> >> end of the semester they
> >> must pay to replace any lost items. THIS have been
> >> the best way I have found
> >> to deal with the tools. Students who like their
> >> tools nice & clean will take
> >> immaculate care of them. Students who don't
> want to
> >> be bothered fork over
> >> the money at the end of the semester. Oh, and if
> >> they leave their tools out
> >> I clean them up & put them back in the storage
> >> closet - students now have to
> >> pay for replacement. It doesn't work if you
> clean
> >> the tool & return it to
> >> them. Make them responsible.
> >>
> >> On the flip side, you always have one or two
> >> students who will step up and
> >> clean up after others because it is the right
> thing
> >> to do. I ALWAYS give
> >> these kiddos Mona Bucks, which may be redeemed on
> >> certain days for candy or
> >> extra credit. Handing that little slip of paper
> sure
> >> makes those kids feel
> >> good!
> >> ~Michal
> >> 3-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> >> HS Digital Communications
> >> Technology Integration Specialist
> >> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> >> http://spotlight.digication.com/maustin
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>> Hi all. I've been teaching art at the
> high school
> >> level for a few years
> >>> now and am looking for ideas for my clay
> class.
> >> It's an introductory level
> >>> class. I'm looking for suggestions on how
> to get
> >> students to pitch in and
> >>> be responsible for clay cleanup. We have a
> >> recycled clay bin, which nobody
> >>> ever wants to mix. Nobody ever wants to load
> the
> >> plaster trough with wet
> >>> recycled clay. Clay tools are haphazardly
> cleaned
> >> and left wherever. How
> >>> do others make kids accountable for those
> types of
> >> jobs without constantly
> >>> nagging? I've tried making a poster to
> keep track
> >> of who does what. I've
> >>> told them that studio maintenance is worth 25%
> of
> >> their grade. They just
> >>> don't take it seriously and then are
> shocked when
> >> their grades aren't
> >>> great. Any suggestions? I'd love to look
> at any
> >> rubrics or other
> >>> ideas!Terry
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re: clay cleanup
> >> From: Maggie White <mwhite139@cox.net>
> >> Date: Sat, 09 Aug 2008 09:38:22 -0700
> >> X-Message-Number: 6
> >>
> >> I taught ceramics every semester in the 3D
> classes,
> >> and also used a
> >> poster charting cleanup. For some reason, it
> worked
> >> very well and there
> >> were few students who tried to get away with not
> >> doing their part
> >> correctly. My chart consisted of the chore to be
> >> done, plus a brief
> >> description (i.e., TOOLS--collect all the tools
> and
> >> clean all the clay
> >> off. Place in the can by the sink.). Each chore
> >> had two paper clips
> >> after it where I would place student names. These
> >> were printed on index
> >> cards, put in alphabetical order, and then
> inserted
> >> into the clips after
> >> attendance and the students had gotten to work.
> >> Most chores had two
> >> people. I think the fact that everyone knew we
> >> were going in
> >> alphabetical order, that they would have a chore
> >> just once or maybe
> >> twice a week, and with a partner, made them pitch
> in
> >> better. If someone
> >> tried to get away with not doing the job right,
> they
> >> had to do it again
> >> the next day. Since I knew--and they knew I
> >> knew--who was responsible
> >> for each chore, if it wasn't done right those
> >> particular students
> >> couldn't leave 'til it was done. And I
> wouldn't
> >> write them a late pass
> >> unless they were legitimately held up by someone
> >> else (they did have to
> >> be mindful of doing chores in logical sequence; in
> >> other words, don't
> >> clean the floor 'til the counters are done, or
> the
> >> floor will get dirty
> >> again.)
> >>
> >> One thing is: don't assume they know how to
> clean.
> >> You have to show
> >> them. What does a clean counter look like? Do
> they
> >> actually know where
> >> the tools should go? If they can clean them and
> >> drop them into a can or
> >> bucket by the sink, it's no big deal for you
> to move
> >> it back to the clay
> >> area afterwards. Here's how you clean the
> counters:
> >> scrape off the
> >> stuck-on blobs and throw them in the recycle bin,
> >> while your partner
> >> follows behind with a really wet rag FOLDED, not
> >> bunched up; folding
> >> gives you a lot of clean surface area.
> >>
> >> I didn't insist on spotlessness since clay was
> >> confined to one area. If
> >> they wanted to work at a classroom table, they
> were
> >> responsible for
> >> really cleaning it for following classes so there
> >> was no dried residue.
> >> This requires a clean rag, not one used in another
> >> area. Go to Costco
> >> or somewhere and buy a big bag of shop towels.
> They
> >> last a long time,
> >> and you'll always have clean ones. I cleaned
> them
> >> in the machines in
> >> the athletic dept.
> >>
> >> As for mixing clay...well, if they need some clay,
> >> someone has to work
> >> with it, and it ain't gonna be me! Oftentimes
> if
> >> someone had to wait
> >> for something to dry, I could send him outside
> with
> >> a hammer to break up
> >> clods, then dump some water in the bucket. I
> would
> >> watch it and pour
> >> off the excess when it seemed saturated enough.
> >> Then, if someone needed
> >> clay, they would glop some on the plaster wedging
> >> blocks and let it set
> >> a while before wedging. Yeah, boring job, but
> >> tough, kiddos. Deal with
> >> it. They could store their newly-wedged clay in
> >> their classroom locker
> >> so no one else could steal it.
> >>
> >> Hope this helps.
> >>
> >> Maggie
> >> Maggie
> >>
> >> Terry Marney wrote:
> >>> Hi all. I've been teaching art at the
> high school
> >> level for a few years now and am looking for ideas
> >> for my clay class. It's an introductory level
> class.
> >> I'm looking for suggestions on how to get
> students
> >> to pitch in and be responsible for clay cleanup.
> We
> >> have a recycled clay bin, which nobody ever wants
> to
> >> mix. Nobody ever wants to load the plaster trough
> >> with wet recycled clay. Clay tools are haphazardly
> >> cleaned and left wherever. How do others make
> kids
> >> accountable for those types of jobs without
> >> constantly nagging? I've tried making a poster
> to
> >> keep track of who does what. I've told them
> that
> >> studio maintenance is worth 25% of their grade.
> They
> >> just don't take it seriously and then are
> shocked
> >> when their grades aren't great. Any
> suggestions? I'd
> >> love to look at any rubrics or other ideas!Terry
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ---
> >>> To unsubscribe go to
> >>>
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>>
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> From: "Sue Stevens"
> <suestevens@rogers.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 17:39:58 -0400
> >> X-Message-Number: 7
> >>
> >> I've been purging my basement.....a mammoth
> task
> >> really.....
> >> I have 'found' about a hundred 5 1/4 inch
> floppy
> >> disks which I'm about to
> >> dispose of.....unless I can come up some cool
> >> art/craft to do with
> >> them.....I do run a course called
> 'non-traditional
> >> media' so if I can think
> >> of something, that would be the course....
> >> Any ideas??? All of the floppies are black.
> >>
> >> And just becuase you want to know, I have a fully
> >> operational Commodore 64
> >> complete with all the good old games! I also have
> a
> >> fully operational
> >> Commodore 128 (but the 64 is better!)......all the
> >> discs that are for
> >> disposal are 'educational' programs that
> are not
> >> that fun, or are systems
> >> discs which are not needed.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: floppy books
> >> From: San D Hasselman
> <shasselman@hotmail.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 21:50:55 +0000
> >> X-Message-Number: 8
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> > http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?
> > ref=sr_list_15&listing_id=13745447
> >>
> >>> From: suestevens@rogers.com
> >>> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
> >>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] old 5 1/4 inch
> >> floppy disks
> >>> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 17:39:58 -0400
> >>>
> >>> I've been purging my basement.....a
> mammoth task
> >> really.....
> >>> I have 'found' about a hundred 5 1/4
> inch floppy
> >> disks which I'm about to
> >>> dispose of.....unless I can come up some cool
> >> art/craft to do with
> >>> them.....I do run a course called
> 'non-traditional
> >> media' so if I can think
> >>> of something, that would be the course....
> >>> Any ideas??? All of the floppies are black.
> >>>
> >>> And just becuase you want to know, I have a
> fully
> >> operational Commodore 64
> >>> complete with all the good old games! I also
> have
> >> a fully operational
> >>> Commodore 128 (but the 64 is better!)......all
> the
> >> discs that are for
> >>> disposal are 'educational' programs
> that are not
> >> that fun, or are systems
> >>> discs which are not needed.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ---
> >>> To unsubscribe go to
> >>>
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: RE: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> From: "Sears, Ellen"
> >> <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 17:57:09 -0400
> >> X-Message-Number: 9
> >>
> >> Several years ago on Getty someone (I guess Kris
> >> Fontes) posted a link
> >> to a book made with floppy disks -
> >> http://www.krisfontes.com/floppy%20disk%20book.htm
> >>
> >>
> >> Here are directions for a notepad too -
> >>
> >
> http://www.wonderhowto.com/how-to/video/how-to-make-a-notepad-from-flopp
> >> y-disks-78281/
> >>
> >>
> >> Ellen (back to school Monday - yikes!)
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: Sue Stevens [mailto:suestevens@rogers.com]
> >> Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2008 5:40 PM
> >> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> >> Subject: [teacherartexchange] old 5 1/4 inch
> floppy
> >> disks
> >>
> >> I've been purging my basement.....a mammoth
> task
> >> really.....
> >> I have 'found' about a hundred 5 1/4 inch
> floppy
> >> disks which I'm about
> >> to
> >> dispose of.....unless I can come up some cool
> >> art/craft to do with
> >> them.....I do run a course called
> 'non-traditional
> >> media' so if I can
> >> think
> >> of something, that would be the course....
> >> Any ideas??? All of the floppies are black.
> >>
> >> And just becuase you want to know, I have a fully
> >> operational Commodore
> >> 64
> >> complete with all the good old games! I also have
> a
> >> fully operational
> >> Commodore 128 (but the 64 is better!)......all the
> >> discs that are for
> >> disposal are 'educational' programs that
> are not
> >> that fun, or are
> >> systems
> >> discs which are not needed.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> ---
> >> To unsubscribe go to
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> From: "Sue Stevens"
> <suestevens@rogers.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:09:30 -0400
> >> X-Message-Number: 10
> >>
> >> thanks for the idea -
> >> the older 5 1/4 floppy disks are really
> >> floppy.....those 'books' are made
> >> from the 3 1/2 inch hard sided 'floppy disks,
> but
> >> the idea could be adapted
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> From: Patricia Knott <pknott_6@comcast.net>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:11:27 -0400
> >> X-Message-Number: 11
> >>
> >> How about asking the kids for ideas? make it a
> >> recycling problem --
> >> and they probably have no idea about the Commodore
> >> which was my
> >> favorite all time machine. Make it a history
> lesson
> >> and then create
> >> a Homage to the Floppy
> >>
> >> Patty
> >>
> >>
> >> On Aug 9, 2008, at 5:57 PM, Sears, Ellen wrote:
> >>
> >>> Several years ago on Getty someone (I guess
> Kris
> >> Fontes) posted a link
> >>> to a book made with floppy disks -
> >>>
> http://www.krisfontes.com/floppy%20disk%20book.htm
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Here are directions for a notepad too -
> >>>
> >>
> >
> http://www.wonderhowto.com/how-to/video/how-to-make-a-notepad-from-
> >>
> >>> flopp
> >>> y-disks-78281/
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Ellen (back to school Monday - yikes!)
> >>>
> >>> -----Original Message-----
> >>> From: Sue Stevens
> [mailto:suestevens@rogers.com]
> >>> Sent: Saturday, August 09, 2008 5:40 PM
> >>> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> >>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] old 5 1/4 inch
> >> floppy disks
> >>>
> >>> I've been purging my basement.....a
> mammoth task
> >> really.....
> >>> I have 'found' about a hundred 5 1/4
> inch floppy
> >> disks which I'm about
> >>> to
> >>> dispose of.....unless I can come up some cool
> >> art/craft to do with
> >>> them.....I do run a course called
> 'non-traditional
> >> media' so if I can
> >>> think
> >>> of something, that would be the course....
> >>> Any ideas??? All of the floppies are black.
> >>>
> >>> And just becuase you want to know, I have a
> fully
> >> operational
> >>> Commodore
> >>> 64
> >>> complete with all the good old games! I also
> have
> >> a fully operational
> >>> Commodore 128 (but the 64 is better!)......all
> the
> >> discs that are for
> >>> disposal are 'educational' programs
> that are not
> >> that fun, or are
> >>> systems
> >>> discs which are not needed.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ---
> >>> To unsubscribe go to
> >>>
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ---
> >>> To unsubscribe go to
> >>>
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: RE: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> From: San D Hasselman
> <shasselman@hotmail.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 22:17:09 +0000
> >> X-Message-Number: 12
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> try this one
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?ref=sr_list_2&listing_id=8447120
> >>
> >>> From: suestevens@rogers.com
> >>> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
> >>> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] old 5 1/4
> inch
> >> floppy disks
> >>> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:09:30 -0400
> >>>
> >>> thanks for the idea -
> >>> the older 5 1/4 floppy disks are really
> >> floppy.....those 'books' are made
> >>> from the 3 1/2 inch hard sided 'floppy
> disks, but
> >> the idea could be adapted
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> ---
> >>> To unsubscribe go to
> >>>
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re: old 5 1/4 inch floppy disks
> >> From: "M. Austin"
> <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 17:48:55 -0500
> >> X-Message-Number: 13
> >>
> >> I made little notebooks out of the 5 1/4"
> floppies
> >> for my teacher/students
> >> in my tech integration class. They loved them! My
> >> students didn't really
> >> understand what the 5 1/4" floppies even were
> (man
> >> that makes me feel old!
> >> *L*) but they did enjoy making them from the 3
> 1/2"
> >> ones. On the wonderhowto
> >> site there was directions on how to create a bag
> out
> >> of the 3 1/2" floppies.
> >> I can't wait to get to school & recycle my
> old ones!
> >> We don't even have
> >> computers at school anymore that use the 3
> 1/2". We
> >> FINALLY got some of our
> >> grade school teachers to relinquish their OLD
> >> machines - the ones that use
> >> the 5 1/4". They were needing work &
> nobody knew how
> >> to even start repairing
> >> them!
> >> ~Michal
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Several years ago on Getty someone (I guess Kris
> >> Fontes) posted a link
> >> to a book made with floppy disks -
> >> http://www.krisfontes.com/floppy%20disk%20book.htm
> >>
> >>
> >> Here are directions for a notepad too -
> >>
> >
> http://www.wonderhowto.com/how-to/video/how-to-make-a-notepad-from-flopp
> >> y-disks-78281/
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Andy Warhol Sketchbook Images
> >> From: MICHELLE MOLNAR <mmolnar1@msn.com>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 17:47:12 -0700
> >> X-Message-Number: 14
> >>
> >>
> >> Hello Everyone!
> >>
> >> I am going to teach a lesson on the various
> methods
> >> artists use in their sketchbooks to my high school
> >> students. I would like to find some images of
> Andy
> >> Warhol's sketchbooks on the web, but am not
> having
> >> any luck. Do you know where I could find some
> >> example images by Warhol? Do you know of any
> other
> >> artists who use mixed media in their sketchbooks?
> >>
> >> Thanks!!
> >>
> >> Michelle
> >>
> >>
> >
> _________________________________________________________________
> >> Get Windows Live and get whatever you need,
> wherever
> >> you are. Start here.
> >>
> >
> http://www.windowslive.com/default.html?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_Home_082008
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: RE: Andy Warhol Sketchbook Images
> >> From: San D Hasselman
> <shasselman@hotmail.com>
> >> Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 01:10:36 +0000
> >> X-Message-Number: 15
> >>
> >>
> >> try this site
> >>
> >> http://www.gis.net/~scatt/sketchbook/links2.html
> >>
> >>
> >>> From: mmolnar1@msn.com
> >>> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
> >>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Andy Warhol
> >> Sketchbook Images
> >>> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 17:47:12 -0700
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Hello Everyone!
> >>>
> >>> I am going to teach a lesson on the various
> >> methods artists use in their sketchbooks to my
> high
> >> school students. I would like to find some images
> of
> >> Andy Warhol's sketchbooks on the web, but am
> not
> >> having any luck. Do you know where I could find
> some
> >> example images by Warhol? Do you know of any other
> >> artists who use mixed media in their sketchbooks?
> >>>
> >>> Thanks!!
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: RE: Andy Warhol Sketchbook Images
> >> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> >> Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2008 18:57:49 -0700 (PDT)
> >> X-Message-Number: 16
> >>
> >>
> >> Wow, SanD, this is a fantastic site, thanks so
> much.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>> try this site
> >>>
> >>>
> http://www.gis.net/~scatt/sketchbook/links2.html
> >>>
> >>
> >> Betty C Bowen
> >> printmaker, painter
> >> art educator
> >> Cushing Oklahoma
> >> bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net
> >> http://www.bettybowenart.com
> >> http://bettycbowen.blogspot.com/
> >>
> >>
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >>
> >> Subject: Re:teacherartexchange digest: August 08,
> >> 2008
> >> From: "Sidnie Miller"
> <smiller@elko.k12.nv.us>
> >> Date: Sat, 09 Aug 2008 21:18:07 -0700
> >> X-Message-Number: 17
> >>
> >> Hi Terry, I have a couple of buckets (5 gal) where
> >> kids get their clay daily. If it's empty
> I'll get
> >> some new clay. If it's too hard they need to
> cheese
> >> hole it and dunk it in water and work it up on the
> >> plaster table. If it's too squishy they need
> to
> >> work it up on the plaster table. If they
> don't work
> >> they lose their participation points. I have 6
> >> tables and if the tables are left messy, all the
> >> kids at that table lose their participation
> points.
> >> They have to put their work away, put tools away
> and
> >> mop the tables every hour. I keep all the tools
> in
> >> a large tub in the back. They don't have to
> wash
> >> them, just put them back--that doesn't seem to
> >> bother them, but they all hate to work up clay. I
> >> have a recycle bucket on the floor where they put
> >> dry clay--or clay so hard that they can't
> work it.
> >> When the bucket gets full I add water and soak it
> >> for about 15 minutes, then I drain it an leave it
> >> for them to deal with. I used to feel that I had
> to
> >> break it all up first, but now I just soak it. I
> >> must admit that this constant recycling of the
> clay
> >> presents problems for the wheel, but after they
> try
> >> once, the moisture level evens out and they can
> >> throw. I have large classes (38 sometimes) and
> one
> >> sink. We all have to move to function in a 53
> >> minute period. My participation points ( work
> every
> >> day, clean up, try) end up being 1/2 of their
> grade,
> >> so participating is not optional. My classes are
> >> really crowded because many more people want to
> take
> >> pottery than I have room for so I spend some time
> at
> >> the beginning of the year telling them they will
> >> love this class and they are really lucky they got
> >> in and if there's anyone who doesn't want
> to be
> >> there and work, tell me now and I'll get you
> moved
> >> right away.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>>>> Terry Marney
> <terrylou63@yahoo.com> 08/09/08
> >> 8:42 AM >>>
> >> Hi all. I've been teaching art at the high
> school
> >> level for a few years now and am looking for ideas
> >> for my clay class. It's an introductory level
> class.
> >> I'm looking for suggestions on how to get
> students
> >> to pitch in and be responsible for clay cleanup.
> We
> >> have a recycled clay bin, which nobody ever wants
> to
> >> mix. Nobody ever wants to load the plaster trough
> >> with wet recycled clay. Clay tools are haphazardly
> >> cleaned and left wherever. How do others make
> kids
> >> accountable for those types of jobs without
> >> constantly nagging? I've tried making a poster
> to
> >> keep track of who does what. I've told them
> that
> >> studio maintenance is worth 25% of their grade.
> They
> >> just don't take it seriously and then are
> shocked
> >> when their grades aren't great. Any
> suggestions? I'd
> >> love to look at any rubrics or other ideas!Terry
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> ---
> >> To unsubscribe go to
> >>
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> -*Scanned by ECSD GWAVA*-
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> ---
> >>
> >> END OF DIGEST
> >>
> >> ---
> >> as: socorromm@yahoo.com
> >>
> >
> leave-525266-229430.e531e0484c8fd095ec61483753422223@lists.pub.getty.edu
> >>
> >
> >
> > Socorro
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: On My August Blog
> > From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> > Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 17:20:17 -0600
> > X-Message-Number: 3
> >
> > I'm posting a variety of stuff on my blog this
> month:
> >
> > 8/11 Docents get back together
> > Olympic Swimming & Diving
> >
> > 8/10 Artistic Olympics
> > China's Children
> >
> > 8/9 Dean Mitchell's watercolors
> > Door to door for Obama
> > China's Show - WOW !!
> > Birds Nest Designer Ai Weiwei
> > Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou
> > Music about Taos
> >
> > 8/8 Michael Hearne concert
> > Art Around Albuquerque
> > Ming's Splash Painting
> >
> > 8/7 Three bloggers you should know
> > Melissa Elderle
> > Chris Ashley
> > J K Drummond
> > Art Lessons on CD
> > My Counter Map
> > Paris for President
> >
> > 8/5 Blossom's Movie
> >
> > 8/4 Docent Tour
> > Painted Shoes
> > ArtsEdNet
> >
> > 8/3 Bubble Bath
> > Frani's new quilt
> > The Artistic Process
> >
> > 8/2 Visual Note Taking
> > Emmy Lou Cancelled
> >
> > 8/1 State Fair Art
> > Framing Watercolors
> > Source of Plexiglass
> >
> > Woody
> >
> >
> > Read My Blog:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/August.html
> >
> > Watercolors on Note Cards
> >
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
> >
> > 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> > http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> >
> > January 19, 2009 Be Patience America
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> >
> > END OF DIGEST
> >
> > ---
> nicnakpotplant@gmail.com
> leave-526754-311338.078725a4da5325fafa6fc70d1e94f59f@lists.pub.getty.edu
> >
> --------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Subject: On My August Blog
> > From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> > Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2008 17:20:17 -0600
> > X-Message-Number: 3
> >
> > I'm posting a variety of stuff on my blog this
> month:
> >
> > 8/11 Docents get back together
> > Olympic Swimming & Diving
> >
> > 8/10 Artistic Olympics
> > China's Children
> >
> > 8/9 Dean Mitchell's watercolors
> > Door to door for Obama
> > China's Show - WOW !!
> > Birds Nest Designer Ai Weiwei
> > Chinese filmmaker Zhang Yimou
> > Music about Taos
> >
> > 8/8 Michael Hearne concert
> > Art Around Albuquerque
> > Ming's Splash Painting
> >
> > 8/7 Three bloggers you should know
> > Melissa Elderle
> > Chris Ashley
> > J K Drummond
> > Art Lessons on CD
> > My Counter Map
> > Paris for President
> >
> > 8/5 Blossom's Movie
> >
> > 8/4 Docent Tour
> > Painted Shoes
> > ArtsEdNet
> >
> > 8/3 Bubble Bath
> > Frani's new quilt
> > The Artistic Process
> >
> > 8/2 Visual Note Taking
> > Emmy Lou Cancelled
> >
> > 8/1 State Fair Art
> > Framing Watercolors
> > Source of Plexiglass
> >
> > Woody
> >
> >
> > Read My Blog:
> > http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/August.html
> >
> > Watercolors on Note Cards
> >
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
> >
> > 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> > http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> >
> > January 19, 2009 Be Patience America
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> >
> > END OF DIGEST
> >
> > ---
> nicnakpotplant@gmail.com
> leave-526754-311338.078725a4da5325fafa6fc70d1e94f59f@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

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