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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: August 26, 2006

---------

From: Heather Ryall (hryall_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Aug 27 2006 - 18:21:23 PDT


Subject: Re: Fw: 4. Re: Online Art Class

I have taught an online art course. There is no threat that the online
art course will take over classroom instruction. In the first place- it
will never replace the true hands-on quality of the art teacher.
However- there are benefits to having an online resource for students
who either are physically separated from the class, for art history or
for review of techniques.

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Sunday, August 27, 2006 3:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: August 26, 2006

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, August 26, 2006.

1. RE: PAEA Conference 2006 Erie - October 26-29
2. Update - Pamela Irving Ceramic artist - more info
3. "Walker Evans. Or Is It?" - NYTimes article (issues in photography)
4. Re: Fw: Online Art Class
5. Mary Frank Ceramics - intersting sculptures
6. Cermics meets technology
7. Ceramics - biomorphic forms - Jean Louis Frenk
8. Really Neat - Ceramic Masks inspired by African Art - Esti Goichman)
9. Paper mache pulp information page and recipes
10. Need advise pls... anyone have the Peggy Flores videos from Crystal
Productions Molas, self portraits, paper molas etc
11. Re Online Art Class
12. Re: Re Online Art Class
13. Re: Re Online Art Class
14. Re: Fw: Online Art Class

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: PAEA Conference 2006 Erie - October 26-29
From: "jane mary" <mjart49@hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 07:42:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

hanks for posting this site. I was not planning to attend but now I want
to
see if I can go. The speakers look awesome!

MJHadley

>From: "Christine Besack" <mrsbeeswax@comcast.net>
>Reply-To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] PAEA Conference 2006 Erie - October 26-29
>Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2006 06:51:12 -0400
>
>HI All,
>Here's the scoop on the PAEA 2006 Conference in Erie , PA.
>October 26-29 2006
>See conference website for details...
>
> http://www.paea.artedlink.com/keynotes.html
>
>Christine Besack :)
>PAEA Advocacy
> YAM Chair
>
>
>
>---
>To unsubscribe go to
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Update - Pamela Irving Ceramic artist - more info
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 09:44:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Dear Art Educators,

I heard back from Pamela Irving. She is delighted that you are
checking out her "stuff"....

Here is the scoop on her mosaics - From Pamela

My mosaic sculptures are on concrete base covered in mosaic. I make many
of
the mosaic pieces as well as use bisazza tiles, broken china and objects
made from china or clay. My original training is in sculpture and
ceramics.
If you require more information don't hesitate to ask.
cheers
Pamela Irving
---------------------------------------------------

Her email contact is on her site. For anyone else who saw an immediate
connected to Niki de Saint Phalle - so did I! Like minds.

http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/saint-phalle_niki_de.html
All of my other links for her are broken now...

Regards,

Judy Decker - Ohio
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: "Walker Evans. Or Is It?" - NYTimes article (issues in
photography)
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 10:59:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Dear Photography Teachers,

You might be interested in this article from New York Times>

Walker Evans. Or Is It?
By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN
Published: August 25, 2006

"....A printer, in a dark room using chemicals, or at a computer
screen, can tinker with the image, crop it, enlarge it, make it
lighter or darker, highlight one part or obscure another.

"In other words, the image produced by the camera, whether it's a
negative or a digital file, is only the matrix for the work of art. It
is not the work itself, although if the photographer is a journalist,
any hanky-panky in the printing process comes at the potential cost of
the picture's integrity......"

I think it might stimulate some discussion....

Here is the Index to access the article:
http://www.nytimes.com/pages/arts/design/index.html

You will need to be a subscriber to read the article:
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/25/arts/design/25evan.html?ref=design

Regards,

Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Fw: Online Art Class
From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 13:07:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

On Aug 25, 2006, at 6:05 PM, dianegregory@grandecom.net wrote:

>
> Put Orwellian thoughts aside...education is changing and there will
> always be a need for professional educators in all fields. The
> role may change. But we should embrace change and not fear it.

The question is not fear of changing, adapting or meeting the needs
of the current times. San D and I are thinking about the same
thing--- taxpayer referendum. School budgets that are open to public
scrutiny and the proverbial "why do we need to pay for art." To
be perfectly honest the entire high school curriculum could be
replaced with on-line courses, if we had any notion that students
would complete the courses faithfully and honestly. I don't think
any of us are ready to see art go on-line. We ARE willing to
investigate the possibilities , but pay particular attention to the
motivation.

I totally see the practicality of the "on-line" for those students
with "circumstances"-- they can't be in a physical school place for
one reason or another. It's an alternative. And go for developing
the alternatives, but

But I think San D and I are justifiably paranoid about profit making
companies dangling the carrot and then making off with the cake.
Don't I see in my dreams school board meetings where it is not about
teachers and programs , but salesmen and jingle jangle. Here's the
scenario I envision:

      The computer art class cost $30,00-40,000 to set up and equip.
It requires tech support away from important stuff like Math. The
teacher cost is x dollars. It will require upgrading before you can
yawn.
      I can give you a program for so much and so much per student
and the teacher sits at home and monitors. No benefits, no room, no
maintenance. And most of them will get their art credit. And by the
way , I can give you programs for art appreciation courses so they
get their credit.
And who sees to the quality of these programs?

Orwellian indeed. Paranoid for sure.

Hey, my Why Man Creates class is perfect for on-line. I would love to
have the time and energy to market it not only for high school but
college. Would I give it anybody for $500.00.????????????

> Our roles have changed throughout the years. Art educators must
> jump in and find out how they can play a part in this changing
> environment...1984 was 22 years ago...it hasn't happened yet...
>
I think educators more than most have seen and responded to changes.
I just started another year and it was another new initiative. But
those changes have to do with how kids learn and how we best respond
to that. The information about the brain is what has changed since
1984. Using the computer accommodates only a little of the brain
information. We can never go too far one way or another on any side.
What we can do is moderate, adjust and make best choices. I've
participated in a lot of on-line course and I what I miss most is
the teacher's look, body language or inflection that can never be
felt on the computer. And sometimes that look or can make all the
difference. There is no Tim from Project Runway putting a finger
aside the face and saying uhhhhmm carry on.... Now don't say we can
do video conferencing and web cams. We are not there yet ! We can
help get there, but only if teacher knowledge is respected and not
abused, exploited and taken for "cheap" granted.

Patty
(p.s. Diane, I think we have talked enough that you know I'm a
techie, but also an impassioned teacher. And a former business person
who knows how they take advantage of the well intentioned.)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mary Frank Ceramics - intersting sculptures
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 13:33:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Greetings Art Educators,

Sergiolora sent me some links for Mary Frank's work.

http://www.nielsengallery.com/db/SummerSurprises03/frankwoman.html

http://www.nielsengallery.com/db/SummerSurprises03/wingedwoman.html

http://www.figurativeexpressionism.com/frank.htm

http://www.antiques--art.com/items/133262/item133262store.html

http://www.ceramics.de/archiv/tb171198.htm

Thought these images might inspire a lesson.

Judy Decker Ohio
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cermics meets technology
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 13:41:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

Dear Art Educators,

Here is another fine site that Sergiolora recommended to me.... Great
Stuff.
Merging technology with ceramics.

Yosoh
http://www.yosoh.com/

"My ceramic work, consists of computer generated images that are
printed with a ceramic glaze onto a large canvas of clay. Creating and
collecting images, I scan them into the computer and manipulate them
to fit the concept. The new image is output onto transparent film that
acts as a stencil for transferring the image to a silk-screen. Glaze
is then used (instead of ink) to print the image on to a slab of clay.
Once completely dry the slabs are fired in a kiln, producing an image
that will stand the test of time indoor or outdoor."

I have a couple more links to check and will send them on to you soon.
I prefer to send them to you in separate emails rather that one long
one.

Enjoy,

Judy Decker -Ohio
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ceramics - biomorphic forms - Jean Louis Frenk
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 14:08:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Greetings Art Educators,

This artist's works are sure to inspire a lesson.... Biomorphic forms
in glazed colors. Altered wheel thrown combined with hand building (I
am guessing).
http://www.frenk.info/index.html

Sergio shared the 2004 gallery with me:
http://www.frenk.info/Gallery/collection2004/C2004Tb.html
Be sure to check the archives too. You will see how his work has
changed through out the years - traditional to sculptural works. Frenk
was born in Switzerland, now living in New York.

Enjoy,

Judy Decker Ohio
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Really Neat - Ceramic Masks inspired by African Art - Esti
Goichman)
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 14:16:30 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Dear Art Educators,

This will wrap up the ceramics links for today. I will be adding most
of these on my ceramics links page in the future.

Here are some amazing masks by Esti Goichman:
http://aniso.com/
Esti's Goichman contemporary ceramic sculpture inspired by African
Tribal masks
http://aniso.com/Ceramic_art_inspired_by_African_Tribal_Art_Heads.htm
Scroll across to see all of them.

Regards,

Judy Decker - Ohio
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Paper mache pulp information page and recipes
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 14:55:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

Dear Art Educators,

The following URL was shared by Cindy to the ArtDollz list
http://home.eol.ca/~props/papier.html

You will find an in-depth article on
paper mache / paper pulp, by Ronnie Burkett, the famous puppeteer,
which compares and contrasts Celluclay and Paperclay, and provides five
different recipes for making your own paper mache pulp.

Article was for Proptology:
http://home.eol.ca/~props/

Regards,

Judy Decker
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Need advise pls... anyone have the Peggy Flores videos from
Crystal Productions Molas, self portraits, paper molas etc
From: "Christine Besack" <mrsbeeswax@comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 17:44:16 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

Hi All,
    Looking to spend some found budget money on videos for my Artroom.
Does anyone have any of the Peggy Flores videos from Crystal Productions
??
her are the ones I am considering...
Self Portraits
Optical Illusions
Aboriginal Art
Paper Mosaics
Paper Molas

Are they worth the price ?? Are they upper Elementary appropriate ?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you in advance,
Christine Besack :)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re Online Art Class
From: Donna Pauler <paulerlist@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 17:44:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11

Vickie
I believe the information below is very valid. (I have emailed you off
list with other info so won't talk about the pay issue here.)

I thought I might add something about Camtasia/ Captivate. They work on
Windows, but I don't think this is available for Macintosh. I didn't
ask you before what platform you would develop your class. But if using
Macintosh Snapz records demos that can be saved as movies to use in
your course. This is also a shareware program and you can download a
demo version of the software.

Our department got a grant for a program called Macromedia Breeze. This
is too expensive for an individual, but if the business or school can
get this for you or you can get a grant for it, it is great for setting
up live online meetings and demos with students. You can record your
meetings which can be played back. If you want to learn more about it
go to
http://www.adobe.com/resources/breeze/ (Adobe bought out Macromedia.) I
understand you can get a 30 day demo of this too and try it out.

As far as setting up an online class, the college I teach at uses
"Blackboard" an online course management tool where students log in,
and get course materials. Within Blackboard is an area students have
passive Discussion Board, another area instructors can use a
white-board and have multiple students signed in at the same time to
share in a live discussion, a grade book, calendars, and other tools
for students to use, assignments area, instructor information area,
etc. You can go to the "Blackboard site" where I believe you can try it
out and see how it works.

Just some more info that might be useful to you as you learn about
options.
Donna Pauler

Vickie-

First off, I want to congratulate you on all your efforts and research
on trying to make this happen. I also want to express concern for your
price, but I also want to share empathy. Could you give us some
feedback on how/why you ended up choosing this company? Is it because
you didn't have enough "buy in" or "support" from your boss or the
community area? I think the main struggle we have to think about is
often if there is no $$$ behind the work right away people won't jump
to do it.

My proposal would be this. If there is anyway you can create the first
module/lesson without any "backing" and have a model that you can
"sell" you might be able to get a more reasonable rate for your future
models. That way you could go after a variety of different sources,
colleges, art foundations, etc. The better your sample is at the
beginning the more interest you will get and the price will raise.

As for your original question, I have some suggestions. Are you
familiar with Camtasia or Captivate? If so, I would definitely
consider this as a form of teaching your classes to students. What the
program does is actually records your computer movements so you can
demonstrate a method or example in real time. You can download the
trial for free for 30 days if you can make some things in a crunch. If
you already familiar with this product kudos!

I also posted an article on a previous thread about encouraging
students to play and explore the software instead of dictating. This
is how you draw a line, this is how you make a gradient, this is how
you make a layer. Everything changes so quickly it is hard to make a
lesson that will stay current for a year much less two years. Specific
instructions on how to use tools in the software could be supplements
but the projects would be more exploratory. What do you think?

I would also encourage a chat room where you can have meeting with
your students and they can post drafts or status of work. Then you
could very easily by creating a free blog for critiques. The students
send you the work, you post it and they are required to leave
feedback. It is also a great way to send out assignments as well. All
they have to do is "subscribe" to the blog (they will know what this
is trust me, h.s. kids all use blogs such as=myspace) and they will
get notified by email when you posted something. You as the blog
creator will get an email whenever a new comment is left. This would
be great way to get kids to connect from other regions of the world.
Plus, the thing is kids love attention. They will always be checking
that site for new stuff, so they can leave a comment, or read a
comment about their project, see what new things you have to say....

I might think of something else later....but its Friday, and I think
my brain shut off for the weekend.

Take care-

Jen Ellis
Interactive Multimedia Artist
Continuing Medical Education
Cleveland Clinic, Ohio

P.S. Don't take any of my suggestions if you are selling it for $500 a
pop. (wink)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Re Online Art Class
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2006 18:44:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

Another option to "Blackboard" is to go to http://moodle.com/ . It has
the
same offerings as Blackboard, but Moodle is free.
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids

> As far as setting up an online class, the college I teach at uses
> "Blackboard" an online course management tool where students log in,
and
> get course materials. Within Blackboard is an area students have
passive
> Discussion Board, another area instructors can use a white-board and
have
> multiple students signed in at the same time to share in a live
> discussion, a grade book, calendars, and other tools for students to
use,
> assignments area, instructor information area, etc. You can go to the
> "Blackboard site" where I believe you can try it out and see how it
works.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Re Online Art Class
From: dianegregory@grandecom.net
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 19:16:00 -0600
X-Message-Number: 13

Hi all,

Hi Michel and All,

Moodle is what we call an open source course management service. In a
way it is
free, but in another it is not. In order to make Moodle work like an
equivalent
to Blackboard, you have to set up a secure server and this usually means
dedicating a computer for this purpose. So you have to buy a server and
the
server software. You also have to know how to set it up. I have been
looking
into this myself and the technical expertise required is pretty high
level.

I am interested in technology, but I do not want to pickle myself away
working
with network software and network issues. I am an art educator and the
type of
work and expertise required for implementing Moodle so that it can serve
the
same purpose as Blackboard is pretty steep.

There are companies that will host your Moodle course site, but then
this
becomes just like Blackboard...I would prefer not to go through all of
that. I
believe a combination of Blackboard, wiki web sites, and traditional web
sites
would be an amazing combination of technologies to use to teach an
online
course.

In terms of money, art teachers can purchase the license to create their
own
Blackboard web site, advertise on the web and teach courses to others in
this
way. Art teachers could make money by setting up a web site and having
affliate links, advertisers to art companies/supplies, and workshop
fees. Now
this sounds fun to me and a great way for experienced art teachers, like
Michal
and others on this list, to make extra money. Woody could probably fill
some
workshops on watercolor painting, for example.

Quoting "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>:

> Another option to "Blackboard" is to go to http://moodle.com/ . It has
the
> same offerings as Blackboard, but Moodle is free.
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
> > As far as setting up an online class, the college I teach at uses
> > "Blackboard" an online course management tool where students log in,
and
> > get course materials. Within Blackboard is an area students have
passive
> > Discussion Board, another area instructors can use a white-board and
have
> > multiple students signed in at the same time to share in a live
> > discussion, a grade book, calendars, and other tools for students to
use,
> > assignments area, instructor information area, etc. You can go to
the
> > "Blackboard site" where I believe you can try it out and see how it
works.
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>

--
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Associate Professor of Art Education
Director, Graduate & Undergraduate Studies in
Art Education
Department of Visual Arts
Texas Woman's University
940.898.2530
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Fw: Online Art Class
From: "Joe & Vickie Magee" <jvmagee@centurytel.net>
Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2006 20:20:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14
Well first I want to thank Donna for forwarding the digest to me...I was
not
receiving all the posts.  I changed my settings to entire digest today.
Hopefully that works!
O.K.
Thank you so much for the feedback, many of you have pointed out things
I
had not thought about.  I guess I was not looking at this as
'exploitation'
of my time/effort, but I do see this side of it now.  I agree I should
discuss this with the 'powers that be' regarding my compensation.  I am
going to see if this online course development may count for something
in
regards to my graduate degree but this alone is not enough considering
the
time and effort it will take.  One of the reasons this course has really
gotten the attention in my school is because our district did layoff
several
teachers last year.  Our district passed a referendum which saved my job
with several others.  But if it had not passed, I KNOW that my contract
would have been reduced.  I was receiving cues from my administrator
that
had me really concerned.  For example, he was concerned about my
numbers.
One reason my numbers were low was because of schedule changes the day
before school started.  This completely 'smashed' my enrollment. It was
not
a lack of interest but management/scheduling errors, but that is a whole
other topic.  I thought it was very unprofessional the way I was made to
feel I "needed" to do something more to keep my job. The bottom line is
my
job was not considered as important as the core content areas.  We all
know
how that game is played out in many low budget districts.  So I
suggested an
online course to benefit students, myself, and the district.  After
reading
many of your suggestions, I am considering that it would be more
beneficial
for me to pay for the training myself, this way I can keep full rights
to
what I have created.  There is another teacher from a surrounding
district
who also will be partaking in this online course development.  I have
not
spoke to him yet but now I think I should to see what his district is
offering to him as well.  I also should speak to my union rep as well.
I
guess I really have a lot to consider before jumping in full force.
The suggestions regarding blogs, Blackboard, discussions, live chats,
and
communicating around the world is exactly my aim.  Yes, there is the
possibility my job could be eliminated because of this type of course
work.
But I believe if a district is strong in their belief about the quality
of
education that well rounds students with experiences from all content
areas
they see the value of online courses equal to the value of face to face
contact that is also required in the arts.  If my district/community
does
not believe in this, well it is no district I want to be working in.  I
strongly believe embracing technology of this nature will improve the
quality of Art Education not hinder it.  Students who have the
opportunity
to share their experiences with others via the Internet also have the
opportunity to create a more tolerable attitude in today's world that is
becoming more and more connected through technology.  I see my rural
'farm
kids' who most likely will never travel further than 60 miles of their
home.
This type of experience is just what these kids need.  I only hope that
I
can work out some agreement with my district/TRITON that will make this
possible in my school.
I will keep you posted and most likely will be contacting some of you
again
once I am back to work (4days) where I can explore this topic more.
Thanks Again,
Vickie
Victoria L Magee
Art K-12
Lena School District
http://www.lena.k12.wi.us/wildcat%20artroom.htmLena, WI
jvmagee@centurytel.net
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