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Re: [teacherartexchange] copying (and I'm venting)

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From: Patricia Knott (pknott_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Aug 18 2006 - 12:03:50 PDT


  I teach Advanced Art and AP art where drawing is paramount to
portfolio requirements. O f course I emphasize the drawing. Drawing
is what I do best, and since it comes so naturally to me I am
constantly analyzing how best to convey the relationships I see so
easily. I have gone back and forth through all the "everybody can
draw" methods . And what I now emphasize is how to see
"relationships." Siting, plotting.. all of that stuff, and some
still don't get it. So if it's not so in perspective or proportion,
I don't care. Most often they see something I didn't see. ( and
that's because I know I don't see everything)
  What I like to give is credence to, and nurture seeing light and
dark, seeing texture, seeing the qualities a line can take, and
mostly seeing how mass and volume can give a whole other
interpretation -- well that's what I do.... explore all the ways to
see. Drawings can be innocent and inconceived depending on the
problem to be solved. I surely love the primitive drawings more
often than the skilled. My favorite drawings, are perhaps, the cave
paintings. What was the motivation and why did they do it? and how do
we convey that primal response today? What today does drawing have to
accomplish? What is important to draw today that devices can't
do? I think most it's a matter of skill to "see." So if I can
teach to see through drawing, great for me, but if I have to find
other means to see, then that's my challenge.

I'd much rather we talk about how to SEE, than how to draw.

I always remember that I could always do all the skilled mimic
stuff , but it took me many years to get to the thinking stuff.
I would really love to think that drawing is the most important thing
we do. But I'm afraid we live in a world where the observation
doesn't need to fit the 500 year old western notion of what conforms
to that 500 year old notion. We often fail to acknowledge that some
cultures don''t view perspective as going back in space, and I have
yet to see a lesson plan for how "stacking" accomplishes the same
thinking. When will we really see what illusion is? (which is
what drawing is) and celebrate the interpretations that started us
on this whole thing about drawing?

Convince me that drawing means you are an educated person. I know a
lot of smart people that can't daw, but invariably they have told me
they learned something about the motivations of art that gave some
appreciation that was very important to their education. I'd hate
to think that my best friends, who can't draw, are less educated than
I . They know a lot more about what I don't know, and that's why
they are my best friends. They "draw" in many different ways.

Patty

On Aug 18, 2006, at 1:36 PM, Woody Duncan wrote:

>
> On Aug 17, 2006, at 9:46 PM, <lpapanicolaou@pausd.org>
> <lpapanicolaou@pausd.org> wrote:
>
>> Interesting reading, with the responses, Patricia and Woody.
>>
>> I do a lot of drawing with my classes because everyone I've ever
>> met who says "I'm no good at art" means "I can't draw."
>> Drawing is a skillthat can learned, and I firmly believe that the
>> observational, spatial, logical and expressive skills
>> one acquires through drawing are absolutely necessary to be an
>> educated person. IMHO drawing may be the most
>> important thing we teach.
>>
>> Linda
>
> Thank You Linda,
> I know we've gone round and round on this subject but many of us
> need to hear what you said.
> It's one thing to know you are correct but we all need some
> confirmation from time to time.
>
> I had a principal once who never praised teachers. We sat down with
> her once to ask her why.
> She said we were all professionals and should not need it. She
> believed in positive reinforcement
> for students, but not for us. We tried to show her how she was
> wrong but I don't think we got through.
> Here's a "Pat on the back for Linda". Way to go girl.
> Woody

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