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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: August 09, 2006

---------

From: Heather Ryall (hryall_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Aug 12 2006 - 10:46:05 PDT


Re: Photoshop versus Elements:
From: Lynne Ryall (hryall@sympatico.ca)
Most school boards have Photoshop Elements as free software available to
all teachers. You might want to check that out with your board technical
support.

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Thursday, August 10, 2006 3:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: August 09, 2006

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, August 09, 2006.

1. RE: Any Altered Book Suggestions
2. Re: Photoshop vs Elements
3. Re: Help need a new fundraiser!
4. urgent: inservice activity needed asap
5. Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
6. Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
7. Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
8. inservice activity
9. Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
10. I don't believe it...
11. Re: Photoshop vs Elements
12. Re: I don't believe it...
13. Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
14. National Art Contest
15. Easy to make artwork display strips
16. Re: I don't believe it...
17. RE: Easy to make artwork display strips

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Any Altered Book Suggestions
From: "Ellen Burnside" <ellenburnside@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 09 Aug 2006 08:19:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

I did altered books with 8th graders last year. I collaborated with the
English teacher who was teaching poetry writing. The students brought
their
poems to art class and each page in the altered book was based on a
different poem (about 10-12 for each student). I think it's important to

establish some sort of theme or idea for the books.

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Photoshop vs Elements
From: "Jen Ellis" <just.jen.ellis@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 08:32:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Sharon-

I would say that Photoshop Elements would be a good (cheaper) way to
go. Many of the advanced features the students would probably not use.
These are some of the more advanced image editing tools that are not
included:

http://graphicssoft.about.com/cs/photoshop/f/elementscompare.htm

I am not sure how in depth your students would go. Elements can handle
layers and large bodies of text.
These are some work arounds for tools that are not included:
http://msn.pcworld.com/article/126472-8/article.html

As for creating PDF's I am not sure if it comes with some type of
Acrobat distiller bundled or if you need to buy an Acrobat product.

The best way for your students and you to decide if the program would
work for you is with a free 30 day trial. Then you won't have to worry
about buying the wrong software. Or even have to buy it at all if you
have a tight deadline!

http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshopelwin/tryout.html

Hope this helps.

Jen
Interactive Multimedia Artist
Center for Continuing Education
Cleveland Clinic

On 8/9/06, Sharon <sharon@art-rageous.net> wrote:
> Thanks for the information. Part of the reason I'm asking is that we
use
> Photoshop to put together our yearbook. We create .pdf files and it
> involves a LOT of photo resizing, lightening, sharpening, changing
color
> balance, changing quality, a ton of text work, multiple layers, etc.
(Some
> pages may have 30 or more layers--no "flattening" is done until we're
ready
> to submit it to the publisher.) Also, depending on the photographer,
I
> might receive pics in cmyk format and I have to convert them to
rgb....
> (Last year the independent school photographer didn't DELIVER our
pictures
> and on short notice I had to photograph everyone! Now THAT was an
> experience....)
>
> A couple of my advanced students want Photoshop to use for themselves
at
> home but they're also interested in doing some of the yearbook work
(since
> it's all done outside of class time!) at home. While it's affordable,
I've
> never used Elements and I don't know if it's capable of doing all the
things
> we need. The article cleared up a few things, but I'm still not
sure....
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Eileen Ellis" <iforget000@gmail.com>
> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
> <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Sent: Tuesday, August 08, 2006 11:42 PM
> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Photoshop vs Elements
>
>
> > Try this article:
> >
> > http://www.graphic-design.com/Photoshop/vs_elements.html
> >
> > Eileen Ellis
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Help need a new fundraiser!
From: judiej <judiej50@mindspring.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 09:00:28 -0500 (GMT-05:00)
X-Message-Number: 3

I've made ceramic bowls with my art club each year and had a pottery
sale during the holidays.
You could check on the Empty Bowl project and see how they do this and
have a soup dinner
and those attending buy their bowls for their soup, then keep the bowl.

Maybe someone has an old car to donate for students to paint and
auction.

Good luck.

Judie

-----Original Message-----
>From: Joe & Vickie Magee <jvmagee@centurytel.net>
>Sent: Aug 5, 2006 6:01 PM
>To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help need a new fundraiser!
>
>Hello all,
>
>Our school is implementing a new policy that will not allow the sale of
>'unhealthy' foods as a fundraiser. In the past the art club has always
done
>well by raising funds through a pie sale, but due to new state policy
we no
>longer will be able to do this. I have come across many great ideas
but run
>into obstacles when getting the kids to do the work. Our Art Club is
small
>because we have a very small student body (less than 400 students
K-12). In
>addition our community is small and very rural so to get younger
students
>and businesses involved is like getting water from a stone. Businesses
are
>constantly getting bombarded for handouts from so many other school
>organizations. I have considered creating a district calendar that
would be
>entirely illustrated by students in grades K-12 but this idea has now
fallen
>into the hands of the new PTO.
>
>Another idea I thought would be unique is purchasing a retired chaise
or
>accent chair that could be primed. Assigning a theme such as "Rural
>America" and allowing each student in grades K-12 to add their
artistic
>expression until the chair was completely covered. Once complete the
chair
>could be fine tuned by more advance students and auctioned on eBay.
Would
>it sell? I really don't know, but what would I have to lose, in
additon the
>kids would really have a neat experience in collaborating the design of
this
>chair by building off of one another's ideas. Does anyone have any
>thoughts, suggestions, or inspiration on some of the fundraisers your
>departments have done?
>
>Thanks,
>Vickie
>
>
>---
>To unsubscribe go to
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

Judie Jacobs
www.judiejacobs.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
From: "Pam Wellington" <loveart@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 09 Aug 2006 12:26:39 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Hi everyone. I have had the job of planning an inservice activity for
the
elementary art teachers and I have been given literally no time to do
it. I
gave the teachers an option of traveling to visit a gallery or museum
but
they haven't responded, so it looks like I will need a written activity
that
will last a full day for 3 teachers who teach K-8 art. Any suggestions?
You
can email me privately if you prefer it.
Thanks!
Pam Wellington
Boiling Springs High School
Boiling Springs, PA 17007
email: loveart@hotmail.com

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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 10:54:59 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

Pam,
        I'm doing a work shop on my Kaleidocycle lesson for the New =
Mexico =20
art educators.
You would be wise to do it yourself of course. It should require =20
about 1/2 a day. The
balance of the time might be used to introduce designs by MC Escher =20
to begin with
and finish the day by brain storming how each of them might adapt =20
this to their
classroom. My lesson plan is below. Finding the right paper stock is =20
key to this
working. Also, I suggest colored pencils for decorating the surface.
http://kancrn.kckps.k12.ks.us/rosedale/duncan/Kaleidocycles.html
                                                                Woody
        I was lead art teacher my last three years in Kansas City, =
Kansas. =20
My job was
to develop inservice programs for the art teachers K-12. It's =20
important to give them
hands on stuff to make them happy campers. It's also important to =20
force them to
think and stretch the lesson in as many ways as possible.
                                Good Luck

On Aug 9, 2006, at 10:26 AM, Pam Wellington wrote:

> Hi everyone. I have had the job of planning an inservice activity =20
> for the elementary art teachers and I have been given literally no =20
> time to do it. I gave the teachers an option of traveling to visit
=20=

> a gallery or museum but they haven't responded, so it looks like I =20
> will need a written activity that will last a full day for 3 =20
> teachers who teach K-8 art. Any suggestions? You can email me =20
> privately if you prefer it.
> Thanks!
> Pam Wellington
> Boiling Springs High School
> Boiling Springs, PA 17007
> email: loveart@hotmail.com
>

Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net

35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703

=93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94

Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
My newest watercolors:
http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 12:02:10 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

I am preparing a full day inservice for our entire K-12 staff. In the
morning I am presenting on integrating technology into the curriculum,
and
in the afternoon I am instructing the teachers on how to work on our
school
web page and how to use Publisher. I will also be doing some basics on
how
to organize Outlook (folders and such). I SO wish I had inservices based
on
art education, but as the only art teacher in my district, and with our
district having all inservices based on school improvement I'm just glad
I
get to teach the workshops instead of having to sit through them! :-)
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids

> Hi everyone. I have had the job of planning an inservice activity for
the
> elementary art teachers and I have been given literally no time to do
it.
> I gave the teachers an option of traveling to visit a gallery or
museum
> but they haven't responded, so it looks like I will need a written
> activity that will last a full day for 3 teachers who teach K-8 art.
Any
> suggestions? You can email me privately if you prefer it.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 13:48:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Pam,
It would help to have some specifics on what you need to accomplish.
You are in PA, so, you know the teachers are looking for Act 48
credit. And, Act 48 credit requires "professional" development. A
hands on workshop doesn't make the criteria unless it is tied to
curriculum. Anything using technology will work. Anything tied to
literacy will work. Anything tied to differentiation or special needs..
I have to do the same thing-- come up with an Inservice and oh how I
hate it.
If it has to be a written activity then have your teachers come up
with a format to have kids respond to art in a written fashion-- that
could be journaling, games, research, artists statements, etc. And
let the teachers do the work .
I' m afraid long gone are the days when inservice was a good lunch,
and chit chat and an activity to make happy campers. Those of us in
charge need to document how the activity meets the requirements. I'm
running out of ideas as to how to make the time meaningful. When I
spend time creating and presenting something , the teachers often act
worse than the kids. It's the hell part of my job as department
coordinator.
Pam. let us know what ideas you are juggling, cause I need some ideas
too.

Patty

On Aug 9, 2006, at 12:54 PM, Woody Duncan wrote:

>
> I was lead art teacher my last three years in Kansas City,
Kansas.
> My job was
> to develop inservice programs for the art teachers K-12. It's
> important to give them
> hands on stuff to make them happy campers. It's also important to
> force them to
> think and stretch the lesson in as many ways as possible.
> Good Luck
>
> On Aug 9, 2006, at 10:26 AM, Pam Wellington wrote:
>
>> Hi everyone. I have had the job of planning an inservice activity
>> for the elementary art teachers and I have been given literally no
>> time to do it. I gave the teachers an option of traveling to
>> visit a gallery or museum but they haven't responded, so it looks
>> like I will need a written activity that will last a full day for
>> 3 teachers who teach K-8 art. Any suggestions? You can email me
>> privately if you prefer it.
>> Thanks!
>> Pam Wellington
>> Boiling Springs High School
>> Boiling Springs, PA 17007
>> email: loveart@hotmail.com
>>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: inservice activity
From: Sheri Fried <sfried68@yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 12:22:03 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8

The K-5 art teachers in my district had a 1/2 day with
a sales rep from Sax arts and crafts. He brought
many, many supplies for us to try out, along with
lesson ideas. I think this was no charge.
We also went away with many freebies.
He was able to answer many of our questions about
supplies.

Good luck, Sheri

__________________________________________________
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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
From: BigCrab99@aol.com
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 17:00:31 EDT
X-Message-Number: 9

I did a workshop for teachers this summer. One of the lessons I
demonstrated
was shaving cream marbling. Everyone loved it. We used the activity
as a
springboard for making decorative papers to be used in other lessons.
The
teachers then brainstormed a variety of lessons for several grade
levels using
the marbled papers. Kids of all ages love this activity. The papers
can be
used for everything from origami, collage, handmade books and journals,
etc.
Book and journal making is another fun activity that can be used in a
variety of lessons for kids of all ages.
I have handouts and marbling pics to go along with the lesson if you
can use
 it.
Carolyn

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: I don't believe it...
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 19:54:41 EDT
X-Message-Number: 10

Well, I found out more info today, and it totally threw me for a loop.
I got
to the school only to find out that I am no longer teaching ceramics and
do
not have an art room. I will be teaching out of a history classroom
without a
sink or storage. I can't believe it...though I guess I should by now.
This
is obviously the way the school system works. They had only one art
teacher
last year and hired three more this year. One is in the ceramics lab,
which is
awesome, and the other two (including me) are upstairs in regular
classrooms.
There is another art room...so nice and big, but they are using it for
the
ESE students.

So I totally panicked today...had to fight off the tears all day. I
didn't
get anything accomplished because I suddenly felt so overwhelmed. The
other
art teachers are so experienced and knowledgeable, and it makes me feel
very
self-conscious and insecure. The other upstairs art teacher just
brushed it off,
already started thinking of things she would do...and I just felt lost.
I
couldn't think straight, so I decided to focus on things that I knew how
to
do...like driving all the way to my storage to dig out all of the 2D
stuff I had
put away. The only thing I accomplished was putting up some butcher
paper and
borderd on my bulletin boards. I spent the rest of the time worrying or

talking with the other art teachers trying to devise a plan. I feel
like i wasted
the day.

I'm trying to think of the positives:

I have three other art teachers to help me out.
I have a second computer in my room for the students to use.
I can possibly adapt some of my middle school lessons to the high
school.
The school is closer to my house than my last school.
I will be making more money because I'm teaching an extra period.
I will have full benefits.
I have heard that the kids are pretty well behaved.
The building doesn't have a bad smell, and the temperature of my room is

quite comfortable.

So it's back to the drawing board...and the kids arrive on Monday. I'll
have
all of my classes, 45 minutes each for the first two days and then it
will be
the regular block schedule on Wednesday. I am now thinking of
definitely
having them keep a sketchbook and coming up with some drawing/journaling
rituals.
 I guess we can do altered books and stuff now...so I need to start
searching
for some really exciting lessons for high school. I need to keep my
wits
about me!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Photoshop vs Elements
From: "Harold Olejarz" <holejarz@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 20:05:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11

Hi,

I would encourage students to get Photoshop Elements and when they
feel limited by it move on to Photoshop. If you do lots of work with
images and need to automate tasks, prepare images for magazine quality
printing and more then you need Photoshop.

The education price of Elements is about $60. You can't go wrong with
it. I have both and use Elements most of the time because that's what
I teach.

Harold

Harold Olejarz
Blog - digitalharold.blogspot.com
Website - www.digitalharold.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: I don't believe it...
From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 17:21:17 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 12

Stacie,
I have been teaching 35 years and it still makes me mad when the admin.
team does this kind of thing a few days before you start and expect you
to come through. I have lots of lessons with drawing materials and they
don't need a sink. My website is www.room3art.com look there and I
will answer any questions you need to implement these lessons in your
new situation. If you have some supplies then let me know what they are
and I can help you figure out some lessons.
 
I got some surprizes even today and I was not told of them. Sometimes
they treat teachers like pieces in a puzzle without regard to our
feelings and needs. Conact me off list and I will be happy to help you
with anything that I do. I have only 1 year left and I don't mind
sharing what I do.
 
Ken Schwab
 

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----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: urgent: inservice activity needed asap
From: Ray Leal <rayleal@earthlink.net>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 17:30:34 -0700
X-Message-Number: 13
I did a workshop with our teachers on creative journaling- it wasn't  
only art teachers, but we did the shaving cream marbling, paste  
paper, and just some very free, relaxed watercolor wash - abstract  
things. The water color we added writing to- following the shapes,  
using different colors. We cut it all up, then used it to make books-  
covering chipboard for covers and  using some of the decorated paper  
mixed with plain paper for pages. We bound them with Japanese stab  
binding, then did a few more journaling, altered book kinds of things  
inside. It was more of a take care of yourself and your own  
creativity and you will be a better teacher- I encouraged them to  
keep the journal during the school year to reflect on what goes on  
after the chaos starts in September.
It was a fun day- even the boy's PE teacher enjoyed it.
Heather
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: National Art Contest
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 21:43:38 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14
Dear Art Educators,
I am not one to promote contests.... I didn't do them.....
I received word about this contest. I read through the rules....
Students do NOT get their artwork returned to them. If you enter this
contest, I would recommend making a photocopy of their line drawing
outlined with Sharpie marker - coloring their photocopy and keeping
the original. You could use the posters then to display around your
school. There is a least an important message in this contest.
From Kate:
The National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems
(NCCRESt) is having a national art contest for students (K-12) and
adults.  We work to raise awareness of the impact of race, class,
language, gender, ability, and culture in our schools.  The contest is
in conjunction with our 2nd annual national forum on
disproportionality in Washington DC on February 7-9, 2007.
http://www.nccrest.org/events/events/art_contest.html
Thanks,
Kate
Kate Templeton
Networking and Communications Coordinator
National Institute for Urban School Improvement (NIUSI)
National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt)
1380 Lawrence St., Suite 625
Denver, CO 80204
Phone: (303) 556-3990 Fax: (303) 556-6141
www.urbanschools.org
www.nccrest.org
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Easy to make artwork display strips
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 21:56:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15
Dear Art Educators,
This idea was listed in Riverdeep newsletter:
http://www.theideabox.com/Artwork_Display.html
Might be an easy way to diplay your art prints (no holes in the
corners from staples).
Glue wooden clothes pins to a long strip of wood (cut to desired
length for your wall). Drill holes in the end to mount to wall. Spray
paint to match your room decor.
You might want to use screws rather than nails to hang it.
Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: I don't believe it...
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 21:10:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 16
Last year we had an "extra" classroom teacher who did not receive her 
teaching assignment until the day before students arrived. I guess that
is 
one advantage of being K-12 - in order for me to teach every class my 
schedule is one of the first ones completed and it is set in stone
before I 
leave for summer break. On the other hand, I never get the chance to
teach 
more focused classes - drawing, painting, ceramics, etc. I know you are 
shell shocked right now, having worked so hard over the summer to
prepare 
for one curriculum only to find out you are teaching another. You are
right 
to focus on the positives. Since these students are all new to you, you
can 
teach some of the same lessons you taught last year. When I did my
5-senses 
drawing last year it was a huge success because the students had
ownership 
of their still-life items. The students brought in the items to draw.
You 
could do something like this to start out the year - it will keep the
kids 
motivated and on task while you re-focus on a curriculum. So, are you 
teaching a drawing class then?
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> So it's back to the drawing board...and the kids arrive on Monday.
I'll 
> have
> all of my classes, 45 minutes each for the first two days and then it
will 
> be
> the regular block schedule on Wednesday.  I am now thinking of
definitely
> having them keep a sketchbook and coming up with some
drawing/journaling 
> rituals.
> I guess we can do altered books and stuff now...so I need to start 
> searching
> for some really exciting lessons for high school.  I need to keep my
wits
> about me!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Easy to make artwork display strips
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Wed, 9 Aug 2006 22:14:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 17
Judy - I saw this in a couple of magazines several years ago and tore it
out to keep - just never got to it!
Also - I started using over the door hooks on some cabinets and then
used pants hangers to hang posters temporarily - easy to change - easy
to store.  I used them for chart paper too -=20
Back from the beach late Monday - back to work tomorrow - we both teach
- WHAT WERE WE THINKING?!?!?!!?
Ellen
-----Original Message-----
From: Judy Decker [mailto:judy.decker@gmail.com]=20
Sent: Wednesday, August 09, 2006 9:57 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Easy to make artwork display strips
Dear Art Educators,
This idea was listed in Riverdeep newsletter:
http://www.theideabox.com/Artwork_Display.html
Might be an easy way to diplay your art prints (no holes in the
corners from staples).
Glue wooden clothes pins to a long strip of wood (cut to desired
length for your wall). Drill holes in the end to mount to wall. Spray
paint to match your room decor.
You might want to use screws rather than nails to hang it.
Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
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