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RE: [teacherartexchange] pre-assesment?

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From: Schuler, John (jschuler_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Aug 10 2006 - 06:17:53 PDT


I do a 1st project with my 7th graders called "Mechanical Creature".
The real objective is to see how creatively they come up with a solution
to the instructions. The instructions are to make a creature using only
a compass or ruler (no free hand lines). The creature (and I explain it
doesn't have to be a creature. It could be anything.) must have at
least 5 parts that are cut out and glued together and it needs to be
colored.

Now I get to see a whole bunch of skills being used in this one project
and this gives me a great indication of how the term is going. I know
after this project if a child can't cut with a pair of scissors or
doesn't know how to use a ruler. Sometimes I think that this project is
too easy for 7th graders but it really saves me a ton of time trying to
figure out the kids. Most of the time in my building I don't get
paperwork on a special needs child until they've been in my class for a
week or so. This project gives me a clear indication of particular
needs.

I think a written test only tests their skills at taking a test.

Good luck.

-----Original Message-----
From: Marvin Bartel [mailto:marvinpb@goshen.edu]
Sent: Monday, July 31, 2006 1:47 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] pre-assesment?

I am certainly in favor of pre-testing to see what students know and can
do. However, it may not be possible or it may not be the best use of
time to bring every student up to the same level before moving on. We
risk boring the best students who need to be challenged more. Diverse
ability levels are hard to teach en mass, but easy to teach one-on-one.

Therefore: CREATE A COLLABORATIVE STUDIO CULTURE

I find it useful to tutor the advanced students on how to tutor the
slower students when the needs arise? I like to challenge every student
to help with the teaching and learning. If peers can learn to teach
with questions and by helping to set up experiments, (not doing things
for them) all will benefit. Self-instruction and peer-instruction are
natural and often the most effective ways to learn. The culture of an
art classroom should be a learning environment where citizenship means
that we all pitch in to leave no mind behind. I call it creating a
collaborative studio culture.

If a pre-test is used, try asking them to name the most famous woman
artist they know. I have had many elementary education college students
who could not name one.

Marvin

Dr. Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
studio phone: 574-533-0171
http://www.bartelart.com
http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ...
a kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.

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