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Re: [teacherartexchange] tech and art/ new comment

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From: Jeff Pridie (jeffpridie_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Aug 03 2006 - 17:07:16 PDT


Jen,

I have done something like your "interactive lecture"
more like interactive lesson plan. I get high school
art students who year after year end up missing class
over a period of time due to illness or familly
things. I created a "interactive lesson plan" I type
up the lesson in word and then highlight and link
words to specific things on the internet that they can
reference to do the project. Visuals always work well
with understanding. I am now experimenting with this
process using podcasting and will try it this year.

In my elementary and high school art classes I stress
the foundations of art in the elements and principles
of design. The computer, paintbrush, pencil, piece of
clay do not function well if understanding of design
is not in place. Knowing the rules allows student to
express creativity at a greater level (understanding
why)

In my Masters Class i found out that "most" book
publishers will supply you with a CD or DVD of the
book. I like this because I can sit a young student
who has difficulty with reading in front of the
computer and the book is read to them as they follow
along, plus the visuals are much more dramatic.

I am glad all you young folks are keeping up with the
new technology, if you want to stay competitive you
have to.

Not a dork. I get excited whenever I am allowed to
upgrade software. Upgrading Photoshop, Dreamweaver
this year. Maybe get a single copy of Final Cut Pro.

Jeff (Minnesota)

--- Jen Ellis <just.jen.ellis@gmail.com> wrote:

> No problem.
>
> I did want to reply being a "native" myself. I do
> agree it's important
> to keep the lines of communication lines open.
>
> I have tons more of ideas......just didn't want to
> write a book...just
> today we were talking about "interactive lecture
> notes" Where you
> create a sort of interactive lesson plan, where
> people can rollover
> certain words to learn more or watch/listen to
> others discussing
> specifics on a topic.
>
> I was wondering about computer drawing tablets the
> other day....what
> if we became paperless someday....scary thought.....
>
> I will say this you can tell a LARGE difference
> between those in my
> field who have and have not had any formal art
> training. The same
> basic building blocks still apply...form, line,
> texture, color, etc.
> So even though you may be worried about technology
> your strong
> foundation is extremely important.
>
> I am not sure at what level you teach, but sometimes
> if you find a
> cool book with a CD-Rom attached that you are
> considering using for a
> class, you can call the publisher and they will send
> you a copy for
> free.
>
> If anyone has specific questions on technology feel
> free to contact me:
> just.jen.ellis@gmail.com
>
> And, don't worry many of my colleagues are only
> under the age of 30
> and we are already all attending conferences and
> classes this next
> year to stay in the loop.
>
> (New versions of flash are coming! I am a dork.)
>
> Jen Ellis
> Interactive Mulitmedia Artist
> Cleveland, OH
>
> On 8/2/06, Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > Jen,
> >
> > Thank you so much for your insights on this
> > discussion. You have made a great amount of
> points
> > that truly need to be considered by all teachers.
> >
> > My Masters in Educational Technology and the
> > strategies and ideas from those classes had not
> > existed ten years ago. As I had said in an
> earlier
> > posting my generation (48 here) are the imigrants
> to
> > technology, todays students are the natives. If
> we
> > want to communicate with the "natives" we must
> learn
> > the language and be able to communicate.
> Technology
> > in the classroom will not go away. We cannot use
> > excuses for not using it, it is a reality of
> todays
> > classroom.
> >
> > Jen I am going to hang onto your posting as you
> have
> > given a perspective sometimes missed, one from the
> > "real world" where the strategies and techniques
> of
> > technology are put to use.
> >
> > Jeff (Minnesota)
> >
> > --- Jen Ellis <just.jen.ellis@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Hello Everyone-
> > >
> > > I am not a "teacher" in the sense I have a
> teaching
> > > degree or have a
> > > classroom, but I wanted to join this discussion
> as a
> > > I have a
> > > background in Technology/Art and work in
> Continuing
> > > Education. I am
> > > currently working for a large hospital system
> doing
> > > Online Interactive
> > > Education. I am a recent college graduate (2004)
> > > with a BFA-Digital
> > > Arts degree. I thought maybe my background can
> add
> > > an interesting
> > > twist to this thread.
> > >
> > > I can say that we are as Artist's in this "new
> > > media" age that the
> > > industry and schooling is in a constant mode of
> > > change, and yes as
> > > educators its a struggle to catch up. Six years
> ago
> > > I learned how to
> > > use Photoshop 6 and now we are 3 versions later,
> > > with new tools and
> > > possibilites we never thought possible.
> > >
> > > I will have to say that as an art student I was
> > > always interested in
> > > new technologies, but trying to learn it! No one
> > > knew anything! I felt
> > > that my classes were just watching the teacher
> > > struggle with the
> > > software. During my sophomore year, my friends
> and I
> > > got a group
> > > together who developed an expertise on certain
> > > subjects and one day a
> > > week we would conduct a seminar on that topic.
> (free
> > > but of course!)
> > > It was the only way I felt I would obtain enough
> > > knowledge to get a
> > > job in my field.
> > >
> > > To be an Artist today, there is more expected of
> > > you. You need to be a
> > > graphic designer and make your own business
> cards,
> > > you need to be a
> > > photographer, and a digital artist, to capture
> and
> > > touch up your
> > > images of work, you need to be a web designer to
> > > market your work.
> > > Roles are expanding. More is expected of you.
> How
> > > can you compete with
> > > that sculptor in China who has a million blog
> > > subscribers if you can't
> > > even make a PDF of your work to email to a
> friend?
> > >
> > > Education is changing. You have to be "cool"
> "hip"
> > > and "flashy". My
> > > job is to go through a boring question and
> answer
> > > test or a long
> > > newsletter, and make it interactive. Create
> games,
> > > movies, animations,
> > > creative ways of presenting the information.
> > > Otherwise, my doctors
> > > will go elsewhere to receive their credits.
> > > Webcasting/Podcasting are
> > > now becoming the norm if you can't make a class.
> > > Blogs and chatrooms
> > > are becoming ways of sharing information. I had
> one
> > > computer science
> > > teacher that gave us his instant message name so
> we
> > > could contact him
> > > with questions. We would get an instant answer.
> This
> > > is the "now"
> > > generation. The age of convenience. They want
> their
> > > answers and faster
> > > than they can ask the next one. If you don't
> > > already, you will
> > > probably need to have a working web site for
> your
> > > class. I could see
> > > you doing a live broadcast with other countries
> > > across the world!
> > > Creating a Camtasia presentation of an
> instruction
> > > guide for a new
> > > software. Have your students create their own
> web
> > > pages and abstract
> > > animations. Digital cameras will bring
> photography
> > > back into the low
>
=== message truncated ===

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