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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: July 31, 2006

---------

From: Lucy Brown Karwoski (lucy.kski_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Aug 01 2006 - 18:58:07 PDT


Subject: New York State H.S. curriculum

I teach art at a small private school on Long Island. We draw
students from many school districts. My principal has asked me for
the syllabii and curriculae for Studio in Art and Drawing and
Painting. Can anyone help me with that information? Because we are
not part of a district, I don't have a supervisor to advise me.

I also need to know if a student can take Drawing and Painting for two
years, thus earning credit for D&P 1 and II. Also, are there any
specific curricular requirements for the Independent Study course? I
was wondering if it might include some Photoshop work.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Lucy
Lucy.kski@gmail.com

On 8/1/06, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, July 31, 2006.
>
> 1. Re: Using Technology in Art
> 2. Pre-School/Pre-K Activities
> 3. RE: Pre-School/Pre-K Activities
> 4. National Gallery of Art Institute
> 5. Re: National Gallery of Art Institute
> 6. pre-assesment?
> 7. RE: pre-assesment?
> 8. Re: pre-assesment?
> 9. Re: table coverings for clay
> 10. Re: table coverings for clay
> 11. Re: plaster bat hazards and alternative
> 12. Re: pre-assesment?
> 13. cool sie
> 14. interactive renaissance site
> 15. more cool stuff!
> 16. tall building comparison site
> 17. African life through art - oops!
> 18. elements and principles - good demos
> 19. REALLY COOL!
> 20. The Art of Auschwitz
> 21. neat site on Colour Theory
> 22. Earth as Art
> 23. Many thanks, Sue!
> 24. Re: pre-assesment?
> 25. Re: Many thanks, Sue!
> 26. Re: Many thanks, Sue!
> 27. Re: Kindergarten Art ... Any ideas and suggestions will be welcomed :)
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Using Technology in Art
> From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 05:06:20 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Hi Jen
> Hey thought I would give it a shot. Good business
> sense to start slow and test market it given a limited
> budget. Minnesota Art Educators has their conference
> the fall of each year so when you get further in your
> promotion keep us in mind, we are a great bunch of
> teachers eager for new ideas. I know I will not be
> going to NAEA but we will be sending representatives.
> Good luck.
> Jeff
>
> --- jenmcaleese@comcast.net wrote:
>
> > Hi Jeff - thank you for the conference suggestion.
> > Maybe we will go? But then again, given our very
> > limited budget we may want to find something closer
> > to Phila first. Will you be going ot the NAEA in
> > the spring?
> > -------------- Original message
> > ----------------------
> > From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
> > > Jen,
> > >
> > > This would be of great use in the Minnesota Art
> > > Standard Analysis. This is the one are teachers
> > are
> > > struggling the most with. The ability to have
> > > students examine a work of art using close
> > > observational tools is fantastic. Minnesota has
> > their
> > > state wide Art Education Conference in Novemeber
> > and
> > > we are always looking for Venders and Presenters.
> > I
> > > am on the state council. If you go to
> > > http://www.aem-mn.org/fall.html this is our Art
> > > Organization Website and you can download
> > conference
> > > presentation forms. You have a great idea.
> > >
> > > Jeff Pridie
> > >
> > > --- jenmcaleese@comcast.net wrote:
> > >
> > > > Jeff- hope this answers some of your questions.
> > > > Thank you for inquiring and for your invaluable
> > > > input...jen
> > > >
> > > > the software should run on Mac OS 8.5-9.x and
> > also
> > > > Mac OS X, Windows 98, 2000, Me, XP;
> > > > - general purpose tools (SmArt Tools) would
> > allow
> > > > teaching (ideally with a computer projector,
> > even
> > > > better with the SmartBoard) of any aspect of Art
> > > > Education, from Art History, Cultural Art, to
> > > > Elements and Principles of Design.. you can
> > think
> > > > of these tools as PowerPoint designed
> > specifically
> > > > for Art Education. Thus, it is mostly a
> > teacher's
> > > > tool, designed to allow an art teacher to
> > deliver
> > > > sophisticated lesson plans on any topic... the
> > > > software comes with an example lesson plan that
> > > > illustrates its potential uses;
> > > > - specialized tools would allow an art teacher
> > to
> > > > create interactive, exploratory environments for
> > > > students. An example is a 'context sensitive
> > > > magnifying glass' -- it would allow close
> > inspection
> > > > (using a magnifying glass) of any (digitized)
> > work
> > > > of art and, depending on the detail being
> > examined,
> > > > will deliver either a voice commentary (recorded
> > by
> > > > the teacher), or explanatory text. Possible use
> > > > would include creating a hands-on exercise,
> > where
> > > > students examine by themselves different works
> > of
> > > > art and, based on their own exploration, have to
> > > > write an essay, answer specific questions, etc.
> > > > - the software is compatible with National/State
> > Art
> > > > Standards as long as lesson plans and
> > interactive
> > > > exercises are designed (by the art teacher) with
> > > > these standards in mind
> > > >
> > > > ---
> > > > To unsubscribe go to
> > > >
> > >
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > > __________________________________________________
> > > Do You Yahoo!?
> > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> > protection around
> > > http://mail.yahoo.com
> > >
> > > ---
> > > To unsubscribe go to
> > >
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
> __________________________________________________
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> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Pre-School/Pre-K Activities
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 08:23:32 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> Some of you might be new to Kindergarten/Pre-K this year.
> I suggest you make the lessons comprehensive - tie in some music/song,
> dance/movement/drama to make the lessons more meaningful. You might
> also want to talk to the classroom teacher and do your lessons
> interdisciplinary with what they are doing in the classroom (what
> theme or letter are they working on?)
>
> Here is a site that was suggested in Riverdeep Newsletter (they listed
> the theme Water): Art Activity Place
> http://123child.com/act/
> This site is divided by common themes. It is a stretch to call many of
> the activities "art". There are some good ideas though that you could
> develop into an art lesson.
>
> Riverdeep also listed an activity from MaryAnn Kohl's Good Earth Art.
> See many art activites from her books:
> http://www.brightring.com/Fun%20Activities.html
>
> Happy Planning,
>
> Judy Decker
> Incredible Art Department
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
> Incredible Art Resources
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Pre-School/Pre-K Activities
> From: "familyerickson" <familyerickson@cox.net>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 09:22:18 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Judy,
> Thanks for this site. I agree some things are a stretch to call them art
> but I enjoyed printing out some of the themed songs/movement activities to
> go with lessons I already have planned. Also the 5 senses section had a lot
> of good ideas. And I liked the washing your hands/clean up song.
> Thanks!
> Cindy, teaching PreK Art for the first time this year at a new school
>
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> Some of you might be new to Kindergarten/Pre-K this year.
> Art Activity Place
> http://123child.com/act/
>
> --
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.1.394 / Virus Database: 268.10.5/403 - Release Date: 7/28/2006
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: National Gallery of Art Institute
> From: "KPRS" <KPRS2@Earthlink.net>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 10:56:46 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Hi everyone!
> I just came back from an awesome experience at the National Gallery of Art
> (see their site, National Gallery of Art, Institute). I am so immersed in
> Dutch Art. The conference was very professional, well organized, and very
> eye opening. First of all we were able to learn with the paintings at our
> fingertips. Secondly, the Director Julie and her Assistant Zev, were able to
> secure the foremost authorities in Dutch Art to come and gives us lectures
> on each of the areas "genre", "landscape", "seascape", "interiors",
> "portrait" and "still life". We also had a music specialist come and play
> the harpsichord, and recorder to accompany the images. We also went to the
> Dutch Embassy for dinner and hear a speaker on Historical fiction. We of
> course saw the movie "The Girl with the Pearl Earring" as well. The capper
> to the week was that we learned podcasting, and we each were able to make a
> podcast about one of the pieces of art. We will be getting copies of each of
> our podcasts in September. This podcasting thing has me intrigued. I
> designed my podcast to be one of a series, thinking I would post them for my
> students (highschoolers) but also for this group, and we could all perhaps
> learn to podcast and then subscribe and share. But, I only took the first
> step, and am not sure how to do the "posting/subscribing" thing. I bet Kevin
> would know. The part of podcasting that I like is that EACH of us at the
> conference had a different "take" on looking and teaching about a piece of
> work, and I think I would like us to be able to take this artsednet to
> another experience by putting voice to our ideas. The podcasts are only
> about 4 mins long, and are almost like 'radio' where people can download
> these 'voices' and hear insights about art. Of course our podcasts had
> visuals as well, (although this old lady wouldn't be looking on a iPod for
> images at any time soon), but these podcasts can also be played on our
> computer screen.
> In my conference there were 27 teachers, and then in the next session
> (next week) there will be an additional 27. The teachers were from all over
> the US and the Virgin Islands. Some were art teachers, others were history
> teachers, and some were elementary school teachers. Most were arts
> specialists in public and private schools. We left with a bundle of notes,
> handouts, a book, 2 posters, a DVD, and an extreme appreciation for Dutch
> Art. I know my colleagues and students are in for a treat when I share what
> I have learned!
> Here's my hint for Dutch Art...it is definitely not what it seems, the
> days were never that perfect, the skies were never that beautiful (heck
> there was a 30 war going on for the most part!), there are symbols
> everywhere, and emblem books to help decode them, over 5 million paintings
> were made during that time, and everyone owned art. The church was no longer
> the major patron (Calvinism) and Dutch artists marketed themselves, and were
> free now to succeed or starve. Who knew??
>
> San D
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: National Gallery of Art Institute
> From: "Amy Broady" <AmyBroady@alumni.duke.edu>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 13:13:52 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> San D,
>
> I really enjoyed your summary of your week, and appreciate the time you took
> in writing about it to share with us. Thank you! It sounds like a wonderful
> opportunity.
>
> Is the Dutch Art institute offered every year, or does it change from year
> to year? Were elementary teachers involved as well, or just secondary?
>
> Did you have a chance to explore other art sites in D.C.?
>
> Did anyone on our list participate in the Phillips Collection Paul Klee
> Institute?
>
> Last Monday I got to spend half a day in Washington. I wandered around the
> National Mall, took some photos at the Smithsonian castle, explored and took
> lots of photos at the National Gallery's outdoor Sculpture Garden, and spent
> a few hours in the East Wing of the National Gallery. I especially enjoyed
> the Rousseau and the Charles Sheeler special exhibits. The Rousseau exhibit
> was the very reason I arranged my trip to include a short period in
> Washington. Since no photos were allowed in those special exhibits, I had
> more space on my digital memory card for photographing other modern art
> there in the East Wing. Still, I ran out of memory before running out of
> items I wanted to photograph.
>
> Unfortunately, my day in D.C. was solo, so I had no husband or friend
> (Jeryl!) to take my picture next to any of the artwork so I could show my
> students the scale. I did ask one security guard to take my picture with one
> of the giant Matisse cut outs--he didn't frame it well, and seemed very
> uncomfortable with the task, but I'm glad he was willing to give it a try.
>
> I had hoped to visit the Phillips collection as well, as there is an exhibit
> there now on the art of childhood (focusing on childhood art of various
> masters such as Picassso and Klee), but alas--it is closed on Mondays. Did
> you get to see it? It is probably just as well for me that it was closed on
> the one day I could've gone--I would not have had time to see it. As it was,
> I didn't have enough time at the National Gallery.
>
> I hope to make it back to D.C. this fall--I hadn't been in a very long time,
> and it felt good to be there. (I grew up an hour south of Washington, not
> realizing what a privilege it was to take all those school field trips there
> every year! NOW I understand how fortunate we were!)
>
> The weekend leading up to my Monday in Washington, I was in Chicago with DH
> for a wedding reception.
>
> It was great to revisit the Art Institute so soon after NAEA; I was able to
> see more of it than l was in March, but still not spend even half as much
> time there as I wanted to! I picked up a bunch of resources from the gift
> shop, too. I also went to the Museum of Science and Industry for the first
> time--it was overwhleming! Unfortunately, the Leonardo da Vinci special
> exhibit was sold out that day, disappointing both DH and myself. But the
> rest was great. We had wonderful weather--not too hot over the weekend; boy
> did we luck out!
>
> I did not make it to the Field Museum to see the King Tut exhibit--it was
> $30 per person, from what I understand, and we were afraid that we wouldn't
> have enough time there to get our money's worth (DH placed a high priority
> on the Museum of Science & Industry, and since it is further away, that ate
> up most of our Saturday before the reception). Maybe I'll make it back to
> Chicago before King Tut's treasures leave on January 1. Wouldn't that be
> nice?! But not likely--having been twice in one year is pretty darn good,
> considering I hadn't been there in 10!
>
> Did anyone else have any inspiring museum visits this summer?
>
> Amy in TN
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: pre-assesment?
> From: chris massingill <chris_massingill@yahoo.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 10:14:54 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> Hi Everyone,
>
> I am going to be switching from 1st - 5th to 5th and
> 6th grade only in a district without a curriculum.
> Technically, last year was the first year for art and
> so my students have had one year of art, but there's
> no telling what they covered as each elementary
> teacher creates their own curriculum.
>
> So, I was wondering if anyone on the list does any
> kind of pre-assesment at the start of the year that
> they would like to share, or do you just plan
> assignments and adjust as needed.
>
> One of the reasons I ask is that I had several
> problems last year where I had planned projects or
> assignments that had postponed when I discovered that
> I had fifth graders who didn't know how to use a ruler
> or how to mix green. In these classes, we discussed
> an artist or a concept and started a project only to
> find that the kids couldn't do the production part of
> the assignment.
> And of course when asked if they know how to use a
> ruler everyone says "YES!!" as if I have asked a
> ridiculous question, but then they come to me later
> and ask "what does cm stand for?" or they have to redo
> their assignment because they can't tell the inch line
> from the 1/4" line.
>
> I would like to avoid this problem this year and make
> sure to cover what they need before we get to the
> making portions of our project, but I'm just not sure
> how to go about testing them on the basics and if I
> did have a pre-assesment it would be nice to be able
> to give it at the start of the quarter and again at
> the end to measure their progess. Any suggestions
> would be appreciated.
>
> Also, I think I should mention that I see them every
> day, but only for 7 weeks, so time is of the essence
> in covering material.
>
> Thanks for your help!
>
> chris in Central Arkansas
>
>
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: pre-assesment?
> From: "Alix Peshette" <apeshet@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 10:47:27 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> Hi Chris,
> Wow, you could be describing some of my 7th graders back when I was in
> the art classroom! I was amazed that some of them didn't know how to
> measure with a ruler or draw a straight line between two tick marks on a
> paper! So, don't assume anything!
>
> Sorry I don't have a pre-assessment for you - hope someone else does.
> How about if you plan a series of small, quick fun activities that let
> you find out what the kids know. One, two, measure your shoe, three,
> four, draw a straight line on the floor! (in water based marker).
>
> -Alix
> 18 years of 7th grade art, now a techno-geek teaching teachers
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: chris massingill [mailto:chris_massingill@yahoo.com]
> Sent: Monday, July 31, 2006 10:15 AM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] pre-assesment?
>
>
> Hi Everyone,
>
> I am going to be switching from 1st - 5th to 5th and
> 6th grade only in a district without a curriculum.
> Technically, last year was the first year for art and
> so my students have had one year of art, but there's
> no telling what they covered as each elementary
> teacher creates their own curriculum.
>
> So, I was wondering if anyone on the list does any
> kind of pre-assesment at the start of the year that
> they would like to share, or do you just plan
> assignments and adjust as needed.
>
> One of the reasons I ask is that I had several
> problems last year where I had planned projects or
> assignments that had postponed when I discovered that
> I had fifth graders who didn't know how to use a ruler
> or how to mix green. In these classes, we discussed
> an artist or a concept and started a project only to
> find that the kids couldn't do the production part of
> the assignment.
> And of course when asked if they know how to use a
> ruler everyone says "YES!!" as if I have asked a
> ridiculous question, but then they come to me later
> and ask "what does cm stand for?" or they have to redo
> their assignment because they can't tell the inch line
> from the 1/4" line.
>
> I would like to avoid this problem this year and make
> sure to cover what they need before we get to the
> making portions of our project, but I'm just not sure
> how to go about testing them on the basics and if I
> did have a pre-assesment it would be nice to be able
> to give it at the start of the quarter and again at
> the end to measure their progess. Any suggestions
> would be appreciated.
>
> Also, I think I should mention that I see them every
> day, but only for 7 weeks, so time is of the essence
> in covering material.
>
> Thanks for your help!
>
> chris in Central Arkansas
>
>
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: pre-assesment?
> From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 11:11:16 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> Chris,
>
> Suggestions:
>
> Establish a possible curriculum for the 5th and 6th
> grade. Try not re-inventing the wheel, go online and
> look what is available and select what might work for
> you.
>
> Second give a simple pre-assessment that might include
> matching, true/false and maybe a drawing exercise or
> creation part. The things should be basic: line
> identification, color mixing, shape/form
> identification, writing about a piece of art, texture
> identification, cutting, glueing etc.
>
> I participated in the development of your Elementary
> program and had many of the issues you discussed about
> students not knowing things. I came up with a
> solution by creating centers or visuals around the
> room where students could find the answers. The
> centers/visuals can be expanded as new questions or
> issues develop. In the case of the ruler I created a
> large ruler with the measurements on them along with
> how to measure a piece of paper, make borders etc.
> The centers/visuals you can use year to year and with
> 5th or 6th grade. You might even consider having the
> students participate in the creation of these
> visuals/centers in order to reinforce the concepts.
> Directing students to find the answers and having them
> available makes students more independent and will
> free up time for you. Having students find answers is
> much more a "real world" experience then just
> supplying them with the answers.
>
> You will find having resources available and ready for
> students you will spend less time on the small
> concepts and focus more on the big ones. This will
> make your 7 week class time more productive.
>
> Good luck on your assignment.
>
> Jeff
>
> --- chris massingill <chris_massingill@yahoo.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Hi Everyone,
> >
> > I am going to be switching from 1st - 5th to 5th and
> > 6th grade only in a district without a curriculum.
> > Technically, last year was the first year for art
> > and
> > so my students have had one year of art, but there's
> > no telling what they covered as each elementary
> > teacher creates their own curriculum.
> >
> > So, I was wondering if anyone on the list does any
> > kind of pre-assesment at the start of the year that
> > they would like to share, or do you just plan
> > assignments and adjust as needed.
> >
> > One of the reasons I ask is that I had several
> > problems last year where I had planned projects or
> > assignments that had postponed when I discovered
> > that
> > I had fifth graders who didn't know how to use a
> > ruler
> > or how to mix green. In these classes, we discussed
> > an artist or a concept and started a project only to
> > find that the kids couldn't do the production part
> > of
> > the assignment.
> > And of course when asked if they know how to use a
> > ruler everyone says "YES!!" as if I have asked a
> > ridiculous question, but then they come to me later
> > and ask "what does cm stand for?" or they have to
> > redo
> > their assignment because they can't tell the inch
> > line
> > from the 1/4" line.
> >
> > I would like to avoid this problem this year and
> > make
> > sure to cover what they need before we get to the
> > making portions of our project, but I'm just not
> > sure
> > how to go about testing them on the basics and if I
> > did have a pre-assesment it would be nice to be able
> > to give it at the start of the quarter and again at
> > the end to measure their progess. Any suggestions
> > would be appreciated.
> >
> > Also, I think I should mention that I see them every
> > day, but only for 7 weeks, so time is of the essence
> > in covering material.
> >
> > Thanks for your help!
> >
> > chris in Central Arkansas
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > __________________________________________________
> > Do You Yahoo!?
> > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> > protection around
> > http://mail.yahoo.com
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> >
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: table coverings for clay
> From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 18:22:23 GMT
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> ......Christa said "I don't "get" the masonite thing. Don't most of us =
>
> use plaster bats under work in progress?".....
>
> I actually inherited the masonite boards and they have worked great =
>
> for the work we have done --for 7 years now (6th - 8th graders). We =
>
> also don't have the turntables you mentioned....and of course storage =
>
> is always an issue!
> creatively, Linda in Oregon
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: table coverings for clay
> From: cwise@remc7.k12.mi.us
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 14:43:18 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> I make them ahead of time. Every student gets one. If they are dry, they are
> very useful for drying out clay from a recycle bucket. If they are soaked in
> water until the water stays on the surface and no longer absorbs, they provide
> a nice humid environment(when enclosed in a plastic bag) for keeping
> work-in-progress wet, and clay will not stick to the plaster. Students store
> work from day to day on the bat wrapped in a plastic bag.
> CW
> Quoting StacieMich@aol.com:
>
> > In a message dated 7/29/2006 9:01:27 AM Eastern Daylight Time, cwise writes:
> >
> > "Don't most of us use plaster bats under work
> > in progress?"
> >
> >
> > So, do you make these ahead of time or have each student make one...just fill
> >
> > pie pans with plaster of paris? How long do you soak them before placing
> > projects on them?
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------
> This message was sent using REMC7 Webmail.
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: plaster bat hazards and alternative
> From: cwise@remc7.k12.mi.us
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 14:46:52 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
> This might be a elementary v. HS issue. I teach HS and warn them that plaster in
> their clay will compromise the pots. In twenty plus years I do not recall any
> pots blowing up that we could trace back to plaster. Too thick, or
> insufficiently dry? Yes, that has been an issue.
> CW
>
> Quoting Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>:
>
> > If a piece of clay is bisque fired with a chip of plaster in it, the pot
> > breaks or a piece pops out because of the expansion of the plaster after
> > firing. When we used plaster bats for pots in the classroom I lost too many
> > pieces because chips of plaster kept getting mixed into the reprocessed clay.
> >
> >
> > As an alternative we place our pieces to dry on cheap unglazed 6 x 6 imported
> > floor tile (quarry tile). These are nearly as absorbent as plaster, do not
> > warp, and chips are not a problem. They can be soaked and washed easily. I
> > set them to dry vertically on a board with a bunch of dowel rods separating
> > them during drying.
> >
> > Removing the plaster bats saved a lot of pieces.
> >
> > Marvin
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------
> This message was sent using REMC7 Webmail.
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: pre-assesment?
> From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 14:47:20 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
> I am certainly in favor of pre-testing to see what students know and can do. However, it may not be possible or it may not be the best use of time to bring every student up to the same level before moving on. We risk boring the best students who need to be challenged more. Diverse ability levels are hard to teach en mass, but easy to teach one-on-one.
>
> Therefore: CREATE A COLLABORATIVE STUDIO CULTURE
>
> I find it useful to tutor the advanced students on how to tutor the slower students when the needs arise? I like to challenge every student to help with the teaching and learning. If peers can learn to teach with questions and by helping to set up experiments, (not doing things for them) all will benefit. Self-instruction and peer-instruction are natural and often the most effective ways to learn. The culture of an art classroom should be a learning environment where citizenship means that we all pitch in to leave no mind behind. I call it creating a collaborative studio culture.
>
> If a pre-test is used, try asking them to name the most famous woman artist they know. I have had many elementary education college students who could not name one.
>
> Marvin
>
> Dr. Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
> Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
> studio phone: 574-533-0171
> http://www.bartelart.com
> http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
> "You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: cool sie
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:04:29 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
> http://www.architectstudio3d.org/AS3d/index.html
>
> design your own Frank Loydd Wright type architecture!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: interactive renaissance site
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:08:32 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 14
>
> http://www.renaissanceconnection.org/
>
> cool interactive site on the renaissance!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: more cool stuff!
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:10:45 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 15
>
> http://www.princeton.edu/%7Eartofsci/gallery/
>
> The art of science - cool stuff here!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: tall building comparison site
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:13:13 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 16
>
> http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/2004/tallbuildings/index_f.html
>
> really neat flash of tall building comparisons!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: African life through art - oops!
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:15:47 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 17
>
> another cool interactive website!
>
> http://www.ima-art.org/cycles/index.html
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: elements and principles - good demos
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:18:59 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 18
>
> http://www.artsconnected.org/toolkit/
>
> Good demos under 'explore' section.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: REALLY COOL!
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:20:37 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 19
>
> http://www.tate.org.uk/learning/kids/city/
>
> okay - this one is really cool!!!! Hours of fun to be had by all - hahaha
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: The Art of Auschwitz
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:26:48 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 20
>
> The Last Expression - the Art of Auschwitz
>
> http://lastexpression.northwestern.edu/
>
> Very interesting!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: neat site on Colour Theory
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:27:51 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 21
>
> Cool site on Colour Theory - lessons, on-line stuff......
>
> http://members.cox.net/mrsparker2/
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Earth as Art
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 15:30:30 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 22
>
> Fantastic images!
>
> http://earthasart.gsfc.nasa.gov
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Many thanks, Sue!
> From: "Alix Peshette" <apeshet@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 14:25:30 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 23
>
>
> Hi Sue,
> I really appreciate all the great resources you have been posting to the
> list. I've forwarded them to my school mail and will add them to the
> curriculum page on the Technological Support web site!
>
> Again, thanks!
>
> -Alix
> Alix E. Peshette
> Technology Training Specialist
> Technology Support
> Davis Joint Unified School District
> Davis, CA
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Sue Stevens [mailto:suestevens@rogers.com]
> Sent: Monday, July 31, 2006 12:04 PM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] cool sie
>
>
> http://www.architectstudio3d.org/AS3d/index.html
>
> design your own Frank Loydd Wright type architecture!
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: pre-assesment?
> From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 18:50:50 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 24
>
>
> On Jul 31, 2006, at 2:47 PM, Marvin Bartel wrote:
>
> > I am certainly in favor of pre-testing to see what students know
> > and can do. However, it may not be possible or it may not be the
> > best use of time to bring every student up to the same level before
> > moving on. We risk boring the best students who need to be
> > challenged more. Diverse ability levels are hard to teach en mass,
> > but easy to teach one-on-one.
>
> I use my own version of the K-W-L chart
> What do you know? What do you want to know? How will you find out
> how to know It? .... and then -what did you learn about the
> learning?(post assessment)
> If you know something already about the problem or question I
> present, then what else do you want to find out? How will you do
> that? What will you focus on? If you don't like my problem to
> solve, what's your alternative? (dodging my problems is not a choice
> solution)
>
> This is how I start the thinking process.
>
>
> > Therefore: CREATE A COLLABORATIVE STUDIO CULTURE
> >
> > I find it useful to tutor the advanced students on how to tutor the
> > slower students when the needs arise? I like to challenge every
> > student to help with the teaching and learning. If peers can learn
> > to teach with questions and by helping to set up experiments, (not
> > doing things for them) all will benefit. Self-instruction and peer-
> > instruction are natural and often the most effective ways to
> > learn. The culture of an art classroom should be a learning
> > environment where citizenship means that we all pitch in to leave
> > no mind behind. I call it creating a collaborative studio culture.
> I am such an advocate of peer teaching --- "the best way to learn
> something is to teach it." But as Marvin suggests the classroom
> climate needs to be established so the comfort level is acceptable
> for the kids. They need to trust each other. I truly rely on peer
> teaching for basic technique kind of stuff. Of course I monitor that
> teaching, but for the most part the kids are very responsible about
> passing on the skills.
>
> I had a very unusual AP class this past year. It included every kid
> from the intellectually gifted to the artistically gifted to the
> learning disabled. The personalities covered as wide a range. And
> they all got along, because I expected cooperation and collaboration
> and helping each other. I told them from the get go that the
> diversity within the group required cooperation. They more than rose
> to the challenge. Kids will do that when they are given the
> responsibility and challenge. Especially in the art room. They know
> they are "different" and they bond in that differentness.
> >
> > If a pre-test is used, try asking them to name the most famous
> > woman artist they know. I have had many elementary education
> > college students who could not name one
> Oh boy... not even O'Keefe?
>
> Patty
> >
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Many thanks, Sue!
> From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 22:32:57 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 25
>
> No problem! We're experiencing a heat wave around here, so staying in air
> conditioned comfort mindlessly surfing the web was good times!
> Sue
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Many thanks, Sue!
> From: "Amy Broady" <AmyBroady@alumni.duke.edu>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 23:09:44 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 26
>
> Thanks from me, too, Sue!!!
>
> These resources are delighting me...especially the Frank Lloyd Wright one
> and even more amazing is the African Life website. OH WOW. So many
> fascinating layers!!!!
>
> Amy in TN
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Kindergarten Art ... Any ideas and suggestions will be welcomed :)
> From: "Amy Broady" <AmyBroady@alumni.duke.edu>
> Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 23:40:39 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 27
>
> I just found out today that Art will be provided for the kindergarteners
> now, too, at my large elementary school. GREAT for the K students and their
> teachers...they deserve a quality art program, too! But it's a bit of a jolt
> to the Art Department! That adds 10 additional classes on top of the
> schedule. I don't know how our administrator will choose to divvy up the
> work between myself and the other full-time as-of-yet-unnamed art educator;
> I just found out today that we are getting a second teacher, but the
> specifics have not yet been revealed. I hope to find out who it is tomorrow.
>
> When I accepted my job in December, I became the 2nd full-time art teacher
> at the school of about 1100 kids. My colleague left at the end of the year
> to accept a position closer to where she lives (dang, I miss her!), and I
> did not know for certain until today whether or not the school would be
> getting someone to fill the vacancy.
>
> Our first official day back is this Friday. (Teacher inservice.) I do not
> yet know which grades I will be teaching or whether or not I have a
> classroom to myself--it may end up being a team-teaching situation, two
> classes in one fairly large-sized room. Or I may be placed in a
> less-than-ideal portable classroom without a sink in the main area. (Oh
> please, not that!)Needless to say, I am very eager to meet my new colleague.
> Very nervous, too--I sure hope our teaching styles complement each other ...
> and that we get along on a personal level, too, and can have fun with what
> we do...and that we increase each others' effectiveness and efficiency. And
> so on....
>
> Hmmmm...I am very eager to get some answers so I can REALLY start planning,
> though I have been mentally preparing all summer, as best I could with so
> little info on the specifics.
>
> As for kindergarten art classes...I was the parent volunteer teacher for
> both of my kids' PTA art curriculum lessons when they were in kindergarten,
> so I have experienced what it is like to teach the littles one. I found that
> they were actually very eager and attentive when it came to talking about
> master artists. I found ways to keep their attention and get them really
> interested in the feature artists' lives and works. So, if I am the one
> assigned to them this year, I will enjoy introducing them to art masters
> and then having a hands-on experience that will relate to the art of
> whichever artist we are studying. I will certainly try to enlist parent
> helpers for the studio part of their experience.
>
> Thank you to every one who has offered insight into this level! I will be
> going back and re-reading the posts.
>
> Amy
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
>

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