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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: August 20, 2005

---------

From: Kim Possee (kpossee_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Aug 21 2005 - 12:31:55 PDT


Digital Student Portfolios-
I have been assigned the task of planning and implementing use of digital
portfolios for the K-6 school system in which I work. It is a small school
(one class per grade) and each child will have a portfolio that follows them
over 7 years. It will include all of the reading and math assessment scores
and info, examples of their products (written, etc.) over the years and
will also eventually include a digital gallery of their art work, and
audios/videos of music performances and Spanish speaking. I'm looking for
suggestions on software for the portfolio template I will create. I envision
an opening page with an image map that allows many circular paths to
investigate the work. I thought of Dreamweaver or GoLive but am unsure how
I'd make a template for the teachers to use to insert individual student
work. If I use MS Word I'm not sure about inserting an image map....I will
create the template myself and teach the teachers to personalize it for each
student's portfolio. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, ~thanks,
Kim
----- Original Message -----
From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Sunday, August 21, 2005 3:01 AM
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: August 20, 2005

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, August 20, 2005.
>
> 1. Re: Still needing more help...
> 2. Fwd: Mastectomy Bill in Congress-Read this!
> 3. Re: Learning to read a work of art ---post secondary
> 4. aesthetics books for beginners
> 5. Re: Learning to read a work of art ---post secondary
> 6. Aesthetic Art Books
> 7. Re: Aesthetic Art Books
> 8. Schools Arts sample online
> 9. Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 30, 2005
> 10. teaching math in art class...long post
> 11. Re: rowdy classes
> 12. Re: teaching math in art class...long post
> 13. Re: rowdy classes
> 14. Re: Mastectomy Bill in Congress-Read this!
> 15. Art on A Cart / Multiple schools
> 16. Great Exhibit of Spanish Art
> 17. Re: Art on A Cart / Multiple schools
> 18. art and Math Research
> 19. National Junior Art Honor Society
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Still needing more help...
> From: "Deb" <surreal70@myway.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 12:38:57 -0400 (EDT)
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
>
> Maggie, With all due respect to your administrative requirements, turning
> in 7 lesson plans at once seems a little strange. Many classes move at a
> different pace and it is impossible to anticipate or hypothesize on the
> pace until you get to know them and see how they move from one concept to
> another. How do you address reteaching or remediation then? How does
> this requirement address process? I would feel stressed too because the
> minute you address the above you get behind in the 7 lessons and focus on
> product and not on process. Hang in there! Deb/Kent
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --- On Fri 08/19, Maggie White < mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com > wrote:
>
> From: Maggie White [mailto: mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com]
>
> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
> Date: Fri, 19 Aug 2005 17:05:15 -0700
>
> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Still needing more help...
>
>
>
> StacieMich@aol.com wrote:<br><br>>It's 10:02, and I'm just now trying to
> <br>>figure out my lesson for tomorrow. I'm supposed to turn in seven
> lesson plans <br>>by tomorrow, but that's just not possible. I don't even
> have my gradebook set <br>>up yet because everyday I'm still getting new
> kids and new classes. <br>><br>Make things a little easier for yourself by
> teaching the same lesson to <br>2-3 classes. Tell your admin, if they
> question this, that you're trying <br>out some new ideas and want to see
> which age group is most appropriate. <br>I did this but never had to
> justify it. It made that first quarter much <br>easier. Don't worry
> about a gradebook yet. I never organized mine 'til <br>after the third
> week, when things had settled down some. Print class <br>lists on a grid
> and just use that for now. I have used ClassMaster for <br>years, and you
> can print out a gradebook page with the students' names <br>on it and
> spaces for ten
> grades.<br><br>Maggie<br><br><br><br><br>---<br>To unsubscribe go to
> <br>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html>
>
> _______________________________________________
> No banners. No pop-ups. No kidding.
> Make My Way your home on the Web -
http://www.myway.com
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Fwd: Mastectomy Bill in Congress-Read this!
> From: Denise Deaton <madaboutmatisse@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 09:39:20 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
>
>>
>>
>> Mastectomy Bill in Congress
>> It takes 2 seconds to do this and is very
>> important...please take the time
>> and do it really quick!
>>
>> Breast Cancer Hospitalization Bill - Important
>> legislation for all women.
>>
>> Please send this to everyone in your address book.
>> If there was ever a time
>> when our voices and choices should be heard, this is
>> one of those times. If
>> you are receiving this it's because I think you will
>> take the 30 seconds to
>> go and vote on this issue and send it on to others
>> you know who will do the
>> same.
>>
>> There's a bill called the Breast Cancer Patient
>> Protection Act which will
>> require insurance companies to cover a minimum
>> 48-hour hospital stay for
>> patients undergoing a mastectomy. It's about
>> eliminating the "drive-through
>> mastectomy" where women are forced to go home hours
>> after surgery against
>> the wishes of their doctor, still groggy from
>> anesthesia and sometimes with
>> drainage tubes still attached.
>>
>> Lifetime Television has put this bill on their web
>> page with a petition
>> drive to show your support. Last year over half the
>> House signed on.
>>
>> PLEASE!! Sign the petition by clicking on the web
>> site below. You need not
>> give more than your name and zip code number.
>>
>> <
>>
> <http://www.lifetimetv.com/health/breast_mastectomy_pledge.html>
>>
> http://www.lifetimetv.com/health/breast_mastectomy_pledge.html>
>>
>> This takes about 2 seconds. PLEASE PASS THIS ON to
>> your friends and family.
>> THANKS
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Dari
>>
> <http://us.i1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/i/mesg/tsmileys2/40.gif>
>>
>>
>> __________________________________________________
>> Do You Yahoo!?
>> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
>> protection around
>> http://mail.yahoo.com
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> No virus found in this outgoing message.
>> Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
>> Version: 7.0.338 / Virus Database: 267.10.8/71 -
>> Release Date: 8/12/2005
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
> http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Learning to read a work of art ---post secondary
> From: Peggy Woolsey <eoolspeg@nbnet.nb.ca>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 13:42:15 -0300
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> To Diane and others who work at the post secondary level:
> What would you have entry level students in an introductory aesthetics
> course read? Are there authors whose work would "help students
> understand the meanings that visual images can impart"?
> Thanks
> Peggy
>
>
>> Our world is now surrounded by visual images and it strikes me as
>> important to
>> help students understand the meanings that visual images can impart.
>>
>> What do you think?
>>
>> Diane
>> --
>> Dr. Diane C. Gregory
>> Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
>> Studies in Art Education
>> Texas Woman's University
>> Denton, TX 76204
>> dgregory@mail.twu.edu
>> 940-898-2540
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: aesthetics books for beginners
> From: "Pam" <pgstephens@npgcable.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 10:09:28 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Peggy:
>
> The Davis series "Art Education in Practice" includes Marilyn Stewart's
> user-friendly "Thinking through Aesthetics." My students like this book
> and
> it seems to help them get a grasp on the topic.
>
> An older book that stimulates aesthetic thinking is "Puzzles about Art: An
> Aesthetics Casebook" by Batlin, Fisher, Moore, and Silvers (St. Martins
> Press). This book has aesthetic scenarios to contemplate.
>
> I have used other more advanced books for senior-level and graduate-level
> aesthetic courses, but these two have worked the best for beginners.
>
> I think what Diane is suggesting for a thread of discussion is the
> aesthetics of visual culture which would likely be difficult for beginners
> until the understand the basic concept of aesthetics in general.
>
> Pam
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Join us in June 2006 for Paris, Avignon, and the French Riviera
> For details, visit:
> http://www.artresourcesforteachers.com/2006Travel.html
> ____________________________________________________
>
> Pamela G. Stephens, PhD
> Northern Arizona University
> Art Education
> P.O. Box 6020
> Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
> 928.523.2432 (voice mail) 928.523.3333 (fax)
> Pamela.Stephens@nau.edu
> http://www.cal.nau.edu/art/fac_pages/faculty_s.htm
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Learning to read a work of art ---post secondary
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 11:17:32 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Peggy,
> I would suggest: Thinking Through Aesthetics,
> by Marilyn G. Stewart, Davis Publications, 1997
> ISBN: 87192-362-9
> Woody
> Aesthetics is about the ability to ask questions.
> This book is the best out there.
>
> Peggy Woolsey wrote:
>> To Diane and others who work at the post secondary level:
>> What would you have entry level students in an introductory aesthetics
>> course read? Are there authors whose work would "help students
>> understand the meanings that visual images can impart"?
>> Thanks
>> Peggy
>
> --
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art & Fear?
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html
> Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
> http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Aesthetic Art Books
> From: Aartteachr@aol.com
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 13:34:46 EDT
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
>
> Pam,
> What level are these book for? I teach high school. Would they br grade
> appropriate for 11-12th graders?
>
> Marsh Gegerson
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Aesthetic Art Books
> From: "Pam" <pgstephens@npgcable.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 10:53:28 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> Marsh:
>
> The puzzles book would be a fun book for your students. I don't remember
> anything that would be inappropriate and it is written in such as way as
> to
> be user friendly. Some of the puzzles really stimulate thinking and great
> debates. I like this book because it is such a hands-on way to teach ideas
> about aesthetics.
>
> I just completed a search on www.abe.com. They have five copies that start
> at $20. These must be hardcover. My book is softcover and I paid $3.50 for
> it at www.halfpricebooks.com.
>
> The Stewart book is also user friendly, but it's written with the teacher
> in
> mind. It would be a good resource for you to teach from, but probably not
> something you'd have the kids read page for page.
>
> If I am not mistaken, there will be an occasional column in SchoolArts
> this
> year that deals with aesthetic issues. If you don't already have a
> subscription to SchoolArts, you should consider that, too.
> http://www.davis-art.com/schoolarts/subscribe.asp
>
> Pam
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Join us in June 2006 for Paris, Avignon, and the French Riviera
> For details, visit:
> http://www.artresourcesforteachers.com/2006Travel.html
> ____________________________________________________
>
> Pamela G. Stephens, PhD
> Northern Arizona University
> Art Education
> P.O. Box 6020
> Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
> 928.523.2432 (voice mail) 928.523.3333 (fax)
> Pamela.Stephens@nau.edu
> http://www.cal.nau.edu/art/fac_pages/faculty_s.htm
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Schools Arts sample online
> From: "Pam" <pgstephens@npgcable.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 11:03:02 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> Those of you who are contemplating a subscription to SchoolArts, the
> September is issue is posted online for you to view.
>
> http://www.davis-art.com/schoolarts/Samples/SA_0905/SA_0905_Sample.asp
>
> List member, Nancy Walkup, is a the editor. You should join me in
> congratulating her on a terrific first issue.
>
> Pam
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: July 30, 2005
> From: Gail1611@aol.com
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 15:28:06 EDT
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Have the kids write about which feature they plan to enlarge in their
> mask.
> Why that feature and what does it represent.
>
> I have done mine with balled up newspaper and tape until dry enough to
> stand
> on it's own weight. Gail
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: teaching math in art class...long post
> From: Bunki Kramer <bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 12:32:23 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
>> I think one of the approaches might be to say that the arts reinforce
>> math
>> skills, and show how math is used in the art studio.
>> San D
>> The question is how does art impact math scores?
>> Pam
> **************************
>
> Hi. I've been sitting back reading about your thoughts on art and math
> connections to see what others have surmised. Interesting...and I agree
> with
> no proven data to suggest improved scores.
>
> I am a middle school art teacher with an art education degree. I also
> obtained my math certification and teach 6th grade math. In the
> past...before downsizing when I used to teach art fulltime...I taught an
> Art
> n' Math class to 7/8th graders as a semester course for 5 years. This
> class
> was honored with awards by the county as "Outstanding".
>
> I also taught art and math as professional growth classes to teachers for
> several years...mostly math teachers and elementary teachers. I'm really
> not
> trying to toot my horn but want to suggest to you that I know what I'm
> talking about.
>
> I've been in the trenches with these subject connections so I know
> firsthand...not what some "data" might suggest...what happens with kids
> when
> the two subjects are intertwined.
>
> If I were to put it into a nutshell...kids may know a little math but they
> can't apply it to something concrete. They might know times tables up the
> wazoo but they don't see patterns. They might see a pattern in a circle
> grid
> but not know how to put it into an algebraic expression. They may know how
> to make a string design but not know how it relates to calculus and the
> "curve of pursuit". They might be able to make a geometric quilt or
> car-wheel pattern but they don't know how to find the percentage of a
> certain color or what kind of rotation it makes or the degree of rotation.
>
> To test all this is almost impossible because it's difficult at best to
> "test" correlations and most tests don't test applications (at least the
> state and national math testing)..they test math facts. If they really
> tested applications of math, then I'd be having a whole other conversation
> here.
>
> Wouldn't it be a novel idea (I'm being sarcastic here...grin) to teach it
> "backwards"? To teach art with the outcome being math?!...and no tests?
> Just
> completion of an art project? The PROCESS is slow...very slow...but the
> idea
> of "getting it" is so rewarding and USEFUL. Of course there are some who
> never seem to grasp it...and I'm talking here mostly about the teachers
> I've
> taught. Kids get it waaay faster.
>
> On the other hand...I have had math teachers say it was wonderful but they
> didn't have TIME to go into it or that their parents were complaining that
> all they did in math was "art". Being a math teacher I also understand
> these
> problems plus each year the curriculum is getting more difficult with more
> areas covered. Gosh...ten years ago I never had to teach what I teach now.
> It's grueling to try to finish the year in 6th grade math.
>
> In my mind there will never be data that will conclusively tell us that
> teaching math in art class will improve scores but I can tell you for a
> fact
> that the testing we do nowadays will never "test" applying your math
> knowledge which is what it's ALL about. Other countries know that...why
> don't we?
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: rowdy classes
> From: "christine" <kotarsky@bellsouth.net>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 16:24:37 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
> Stacey,
> My middle schools kids know exactally what I expect form them. I have a
> syllabus and we go ove the expectations and consequesces the first day.
> The
> need rewards and at this age talking to friends is a big one. So I tell
> them
> if the can remain on task during class time, then the last five minutes of
> class they can move to another table and talk to their friends. You can do
> this everyday or make it a Friday thing. The of course have assigned seats
> and I move them around if I need to. It's so funny when you give them new
> seats because they become shy to sit by kids they never talk to and you
> can
> hear a pin drop in the class. This is diffrent for each class.And call
> home.
> I have a time out in the class and I call home, this makes a big
> difference.
> Good luck , Christine
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: teaching math in art class...long post
> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 13:52:53 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
> Insightful and dead on as usual Bunki. Today driving
> along in the car I was thinking about how my class is
> really the main place our low elementary math
> acheivement shows up. I bet even more than in the 6th
> grade math class, for the very reasons you mention.
>
> (There was nothing in my life that taught me fractions
> as fast as learning to cut double multiple-opening
> mats!)
>
> If you are still ever available for inservice teaching
> on this subject would you please let me know off list?
> I bet I could get you a gig.
>
> Betty
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: rowdy classes
> From: StacieMich@aol.com
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 18:20:42 EDT
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
> Thanks.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Mastectomy Bill in Congress-Read this!
> From: Maggie White <mwhiteaz@cybertrails.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 16:22:23 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 14
>
> This, for once, is NOT an urban legend. This bill has been introduced
> and set aside many times over the years in Congress. It is currently
> being sponsored by a senator and a representative, both women. However,
> much more effective than signing an Internet petition--because how can
> signatures be verified?--is to send letters, faxes, and even e-mails
> directly to your Congressional delegation urging their support.
>
> Maggie
>
> Denise Deaton wrote:
>
>>>There's a bill called the Breast Cancer Patient
>>>Protection Act which will
>>>require insurance companies to cover a minimum
>>>48-hour hospital stay for
>>>patients undergoing a mastectomy. It's about
>>>eliminating the "drive-through
>>>mastectomy" where women are forced to go home hours
>>>after surgery against
>>>the wishes of their doctor, still groggy from
>>>anesthesia and sometimes with
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Art on A Cart / Multiple schools
> From: "Carol K." <chudrlik@earthlink.net>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 20:23:48 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 15
>
> Hi everyone.
> I am a first year teacher and I will be teaching elementary at 4
> schools, mostly on a cart. I would LOVE to hear any tips about
> teaching on a cart and any suggestions about teaching at more than
> one school. (Transporting supplies/visuals...maintaining a system of
> organization...keeping my sanity...)
> -Carol
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Great Exhibit of Spanish Art
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 20:11:18 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 16
>
> I just got back from the preview opening of the second,
> in a series of three, exhibit of Spanish art at the
> Albuquerque Museum. I was so impressed by the paintings
> and by the way it was displayed. Such a crowd, it was
> hard to get near the paintings. Fortunately, on Monday
> when the museum is closed, docents get a private tour.
> The exhibition is called "Prelude to Spanish Modernism:
> Fortuny to Picasso". I did a presentation on one of the
> artists, Joaquin Sorolla a couple of weeks back.
> http://www.taospaint.com/Joaquin/Sorolla.html
> If you are going to be near Albuquerque before November
> 27, I suggest that you make time to see this exhibition.
> It will also be in Dallas, Texas after it closes here.
> It will hang at the Meadows Museum in Dallas.
> http://www.cabq.gov/museum/featured.html
>
> Albuquerque is celebrating it's 300th birthday with these
> three exhibitions of Spanish Art. The last exhibit,
> "Picasso to Plensa: A Century of Art from Spain" will be
> on display December 18th through April 16th, 2006.
>
> Woody
> --
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art & Fear?
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html
> Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
> http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Art on A Cart / Multiple schools
> From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 21:50:27 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 17
>
> I taught on a cart in one of my buildings for about 8 years - I have alot
> of
> tips on my website. Because of the way I did my watercups I would only
> plan
> to paint with one class at a time - if your water situation is better than
> mine was you could paint with more. Plan ahead on how you can carry your
> supplies on your cart - I remember one year I was weaving with one class
> (big box of yarn), doing cut paper with another (big box of colored paper
> squares cut to size), and doing research projects with another class
> (stacks
> of art books). I didn't even think about how I was going to transport all
> those items on my cart. It is much better to do yarn projects with 2-3
> classes at once, same with cut paper projects - anything that requires
> additional supplies.
>
> I still teach in 2 towns, 3 buildings, 4 classrooms daily. Do units in
> each
> building that use the same visuals - don't try to transport stuff you need
> THAT day. Immediately plan some back-up lessons so that when you walk into
> that classroom and discover that your supplies are in a different building
> then you can go on as if it were planned all along. Be flexible, and work
> on
> not allowing small things to stress you. I have two large plastic boxes
> with
> handles that I keep in my trunk. I use these to transport items. It helps
> to
> have a specific system for transporting items so that you can keep track
> of
> your stuff. If you have a limited amount of basic supplies (scissors, glue
> bottles, paintbrushes, etc) then I would create a box just for these
> items,
> knowing that this box will always be with you. Invest in a cart to put
> your
> boxes on - one of those shopping cart type things - your back will
> appreciate it later. Maintain a sense of humor above all else, cause it
> will
> help when you run into all the challenges you will face. Once you get your
> organization down it won't seem that big of a deal. I'm sure I'll think of
> lots more to share as soon as I hit "Send". :-)
> ~Michal
> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>
>> Hi everyone.
>> I am a first year teacher and I will be teaching elementary at 4
>> schools,
>> mostly on a cart. I would LOVE to hear any tips about teaching on a
>> cart
>> and any suggestions about teaching at more than one school.
>> (Transporting supplies/visuals...maintaining a system of
>> organization...keeping my sanity...)
>> -Carol
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: art and Math Research
> From: "Jean Womack" <jeaneger@jeaneger.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 20:31:52 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 18
>
> IDEA #1 - math and art
>
> There is lots of math and measuring involved in layout and pasteup for a
> graphic arts project. You can do it with a T-square and a triangle.
>
> Here's a problem. You want to publish a newsletter that is 50 percent
> advertising. Decide the size of your newsletter. You will need to publish
> either 4 pages, 8 pages, 12 pages, etc, adding four pages (one sheet of
> paper) each time. If it costs $700 to print 5,000 copies of a 4-page
> newsletter,. and you want to make $2,000 profit for your time (which
> includes designing the ads), how much should you charge for each ad? You
> can make a table of these values. How many ads will you have if they are
> each 1`/4 page? If half of them are 1/4 page and the rest are 1/8 page?
> How
> much should you charge for those ads? What size are the ads? What should
> you charge for someone to put their business card in the newsletter?
> Etc,
> ad infinitum. Be sure to have them draw it out on paper, not just do the
> math calculations.
>
> IDEA #2
>
> I took a course in math for middle school students in which we were taught
> that we should teach finding an area by adding areas of triangles. In
> this
> method, the students are given a board with a grid, in which nails have
> been
> hammered into the grid at the intersections of lines. Then the student
> places rubber bands around the nails to form either a rectangular or
> triangular area. They can construct an irregular geometric shape this
> way,
> with a series of overlapping triangles.
>
> As I looked at this wonderful board full of nails, it reminded me of a
> star
> chart where you have the stars but they don't look like anything except
> dots
> until you draw lines connecting them. So I made a kind of a star chart
> with
> a woodburner into that board and arranged it so I could make a
> constellation
> with the rubber bands. It seemed there were lots of artistic
> possibilities
> there.
>
> IDEA #3 Tessellations
>
> IDEA #4 building geometric forms out of paper. (Use patterns and decorate
> them in colored pencil)
>
> Jean Womack
> http://www.jeaneger.com
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: National Junior Art Honor Society
> From: Kimberly Hutts <kimberly_hutts@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sat, 20 Aug 2005 22:16:59 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 19
>
> Hello friends,
>
> I am considering taking my art club to the next level
> by participating in NJAHS.
>
> I teach 1st - 8th grade art at a Catholic school and
> have an art club for 5-8th grade. I have been trying
> to find out as much as I can about NJAHS acitivites
> and benefits in order to decide if this change would
> be worth our time and $. We can do the membership
> fees with no problem as I am already an NAEA member
> and the additional cost to students would be minimal,
> $3. I'm more concerned with how much time it will
> take in paperwork and what more my students will get
> from the program that I can not offer them now. I
> would greatly appreciate any information that you
> could pass along to me on this issue.
>
> Sincerely,
> Kimberly Butts
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________
> Start your day with Yahoo! - make it your home page
> http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
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