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Re: [teacherartexchange] Research

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From: Betty B (bettycarol_40_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Aug 19 2005 - 22:00:56 PDT


--- Pam <pgstephens@npgcable.com> wrote:

> >>I believe that art can produce lots of hard data.
> It depends how you
> >>define what you are looking for.<<
>
> The question is how does art impact math scores?
>
> I would hold suspect any hard data that points to
> art making math test
> scores rise. There are too many factors within a
> school to isolate art as
> the component that made scores rise.
>
> TETAC studied this in 36 sites across the United
> States for a period of five
> years. While art learning improved, it could not be
> empathetically reported
> that art contributed to higher test scores in any
> other content area.
>
> Our best effort is to show that the arts generally
> improve critical thinking
> skills. It should therefore stand to reason that
> better developed critical
> thinking skills in art will naturally transfer to
> other content areas. Data
> to support this supposition comes in the form of SAT
> tests when students who
> have had arts classes in high school score higher
> than those who did not
> have arts classes.
>
> From Sedona,
> Pam
>
> ____________________________________________________
>
> Pamela G. Stephens, PhD
> Northern Arizona University
> Art Education
> P.O. Box 6020
> Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6020
> 928.523.2432 (voice mail) 928.523.3333 (fax)
> Pamela.Stephens@nau.edu
> http://www.cal.nau.edu/art/fac_pages/faculty_s.htm
>
>
>
>
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